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African Americans of Portland (Images of America)

Oregon Black Pioneers, Kimberly Stowers Moreland

2013    128 Pages    (Arcadia Publishing)

DDC: 979.549    LCC: F884.P89

OCLC: 809028266    LCCN: 2012941001    ISBN 13: 9780738596198    ISBN 10: 0738596191

The prolific journey of African Americans in Portland is rooted in the courageous determination of black pioneers to begin anew in an unfamiliar and often hostile territory. Amazingly, a small population of African Americans settled in Portland against a backdrop of exclusion laws that banned free blacks from settling in Oregon. At the end of the 19th century, new employment opportunities in Portland and growing antiblack sentiments elsewhere spurred the growth of Portland’s African American [...]

The prolific journey of African Americans in Portland is rooted in the courageous determination of black pioneers to begin anew in an unfamiliar and often hostile territory. Amazingly, a small population of African Americans settled in Portland against a backdrop of exclusion laws that banned free blacks from settling in Oregon. At the end of the 19th century, new employment opportunities in Portland and growing antiblack sentiments elsewhere spurred the growth of Portland’s African American community. Approximately 75 African American men were hired at the Portland Hotel, and the completion of transcontinental rail lines brought African American railroad workers to Portland. By 1890, the majority of Oregon’s black population resided in Multnomah County, and Portland became the center of a thriving black middle-class community. Fifty years later, the recruitment of defense workers increased the population of African Americans nearly tenfold. The war boom, coupled with the tragic Vanport flood, forever changed Portland’s urban landscape and reshaped the socioeconomic realities of Portland’s African American community. [less]

$21.99

American Slave, American Hero: York of the Lewis and Clark Expedition

Laurence Pringle

2006    40 Pages    (Calkins Creek)

DDC: 917.8042092    LCC: F592.7.Y67

OCLC: 62782118    LCCN: 2005037352    ISBN 13: 9781590782828    ISBN 10: 1590782828

Lexile:
990L

The little-known life of York, the African American slave owned by William Clark, and his contributions to the success of the Lewis and Clark expedition are examined in this carefully crafted Society of School Librarians International Honor Book. Award-winning author Laurence Pringle gives an accurate account of York's life—before, during, and after the expedition. Using quotations from the expedition's journals, he tells how York's skills, strength, and intelligence [...]

The little-known life of York, the African American slave owned by William Clark, and his contributions to the success of the Lewis and Clark expedition are examined in this carefully crafted Society of School Librarians International Honor Book. Award-winning author Laurence Pringle gives an accurate account of York's life—before, during, and after the expedition. Using quotations from the expedition's journals, he tells how York's skills, strength, and intelligence helped in the day-to-day challenges of the journey. Artists Cornelius Van Wright and Ying-Hwa Hu consulted with a Lewis and Clark expert to create thoroughly researched and stunning watercolor paintings of York's life. [less]

$19.95
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Black Indians: A Hidden Heritage

William Loren Katz

2012    272 Pages    (Atheneum Books for Young Readers)

DDC: 970.004043    LCC: E98.R28

OCLC: 769868216    LCCN: 2012372174    ISBN 13: 9781442446373    ISBN 10: 1442446374

The compelling account of how two heritages united in their struggle to gain freedom and equality in America—now updated with new content!The first paths to freedom taken by runaway slaves led to Native American villages. There, black men and women found acceptance and friendship among our country’s original inhabitants. Though they seldom appear in textbooks and movies, the children of Native- and African-American marriages helped shape the early days of the fur trade, added a new dimension [...]

The compelling account of how two heritages united in their struggle to gain freedom and equality in America—now updated with new content!The first paths to freedom taken by runaway slaves led to Native American villages. There, black men and women found acceptance and friendship among our country’s original inhabitants. Though they seldom appear in textbooks and movies, the children of Native- and African-American marriages helped shape the early days of the fur trade, added a new dimension to frontier diplomacy, and made a daring contribution to the fight for American liberty.Since its original publication, William Loren Katz’s Black Indians has remained the definitive work on a long, arduous quest for freedom and equality. This new edition features a new cover and includes updated information about a neglected chapter in American history. [less]

$13.99

Breaking Chains: Slavery on Trial in the Oregon Territory

R. Gregory Nokes

2013    240 Pages    (Oregon State University Press)

DDC: 342.79508    LCC: KFO2801.6.S55 N65

OCLC: 847007773    LCCN: 2012044623    ISBN 13: 9780870717123    ISBN 10: 087071712X

When they were brought to Oregon in 1844, Missouri slaves Robin and Polly Holmes and their children were promised freedom in exchange for helping develop their owner’s Willamette Valley farm. However, Nathaniel Ford, an influential settler and legislator, kept them in bondage until 1850, even then refusing to free their children. Holmes took his former master to court and, in the face of enormous odds, won the case in 1853.In Breaking Chains, R. Gregory Nokes tells the story of the only [...]

When they were brought to Oregon in 1844, Missouri slaves Robin and Polly Holmes and their children were promised freedom in exchange for helping develop their owner’s Willamette Valley farm. However, Nathaniel Ford, an influential settler and legislator, kept them in bondage until 1850, even then refusing to free their children. Holmes took his former master to court and, in the face of enormous odds, won the case in 1853.In Breaking Chains, R. Gregory Nokes tells the story of the only slavery case adjudicated in Oregon’s pre-Civil War courts—Holmes v. Ford. Through the lens of this landmark case, Nokes explores the historical context of racism in Oregon and the West, reminding readers that there actually were slaves in Oregon, though relatively few in number.Drawing on the court record, Nokes offers an intimate account of the relationship between a slave and his master from the slave’s point of view. He also explores the experiences of other slaves in early Oregon, examining attitudes toward race and revealing contradictions in the state’s history. Oregon was the only free state admitted to the union with a voter-approved constitutional clause banning African Americans and, despite the prohibition of slavery in the state, many in Oregon tolerated it and supported politicians who advocated for slavery, including Oregon’s first territorial governor.Breaking Chains sheds light on a somber part of Oregon’s history, bringing the story of slavery in Oregon to a broader audience. The book will appeal to readers interested in Pacific Northwest history and in the history of slavery in the United States. [less]

$19.95

Buffalo Soldiers and the American West (Graphic History)

Jason Glaser

2006    32 Pages    (Graphic Library)

LCC: LB1632

OCLC: 334967239    ISBN 13: 9780736862042    ISBN 10: 0736862048

Tells the story of the African American soldiers known as the Buffalo Soldiers, who fought against American Indians and protected the Western Frontier of the United States. Written in graphic-novel format.

Tells the story of the African American soldiers known as the Buffalo Soldiers, who fought against American Indians and protected the Western Frontier of the United States. Written in graphic-novel format. [less]

$8.10
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Class and Race in the Frontier Army

Kevin Adams

2009    296 Pages    (University of Oklahoma Press)

DDC: 355.00978    LCC: F594.A37

OCLC: 495309850    LCCN: 2008032889    ISBN 13: 9780806139814    ISBN 10: 0806139811

Historians have long assumed that ethnic and racial divisions in post-Civil War America were reflected in the U.S. Army, of whose enlistees 40 percent were foreign-born. Now Kevin Adams shows that the frontier army was characterized by a "Victorian class divide" that overshadowed ethnic prejudices. Class and Race in the Frontier Army marks the first application of recent research on class, race, and ethnicity to the social and cultural history of military life on the western frontier. Adams [...]

Historians have long assumed that ethnic and racial divisions in post-Civil War America were reflected in the U.S. Army, of whose enlistees 40 percent were foreign-born. Now Kevin Adams shows that the frontier army was characterized by a "Victorian class divide" that overshadowed ethnic prejudices. Class and Race in the Frontier Army marks the first application of recent research on class, race, and ethnicity to the social and cultural history of military life on the western frontier. Adams draws on a wealth of military records and soldiers' diaries and letters to reconstruct everyday army life--from work and leisure to consumption, intellectual pursuits, and political activity--and shows that an inflexible class barrier stood between officers and enlisted men. As Adams relates, officers lived in relative opulence while enlistees suffered poverty, neglect, and abuse. Although racism was ingrained in official policy and informal behavior, no similar prejudice colored the experience of soldiers who were immigrants. Officers and enlisted men paid much less attention to ethnic differences than to social class--officers flaunting and protecting their status, enlisted men seething with class resentment. Treating the army as a laboratory to better understand American society in the Gilded Age, Adams suggests that military attitudes mirrored civilian life in that era--with enlisted men, especially, illustrating the emerging class-consciousness among the working poor. Class and Race in the Frontier Army offers fresh insight into the interplay of class, race, and ethnicity in late-nineteenth-century America. [less]

$34.95

Color of Night: Race, Railroaders, and Murder in the Wartime West, The

Max Geier

2015    384 Pages    (Oregon State University Press)

DDC: 364.152    LCC: HD8039.R12 U635

OCLC: 907651569    LCCN: 2015030572    ISBN 13: 9780870718205    ISBN 10: 0870718207

On an unusually cold January night in 1943, Martha James was murdered on a train in rural Oregon, near the Willamette Valley town of Albany. She was White, Southern, and newly-married to a Navy pilot. Despite inconsistent and contradictory eyewitness accounts, a young Black cook by the name of Robert Folkes, a trainman from South Central Los Angeles, was charged with the crime. The ensuing investigation and sensational murder trial captured national attention during a period of intense wartime [...]

On an unusually cold January night in 1943, Martha James was murdered on a train in rural Oregon, near the Willamette Valley town of Albany. She was White, Southern, and newly-married to a Navy pilot. Despite inconsistent and contradictory eyewitness accounts, a young Black cook by the name of Robert Folkes, a trainman from South Central Los Angeles, was charged with the crime. The ensuing investigation and sensational murder trial captured national attention during a period of intense wartime fervor and extensive Black domestic migration. Folkes’ trial and controversial conviction—resulting in his execution by the state of Oregon—reshaped how Oregonians and others in the West thought about race, class, and privilege. In this deeply researched and detailed account, Geier explores how race, gender, and class affected the attitudes of local town-folk, law officers, and courtroom jurors toward Black trainmen on the West Coast, at a time when militarization skewed perceptions of virtue, status, and authority.  He delves into the working conditions and experiences of unionized Black trainmen in their “home and away” lives in Los Angeles and Portland, while illuminating the different ways that they, and other residents of Oregon and southern California, responded to news of “Oregon’s murdered war bride.” Reporters, civil rights activists, and curiosity seekers transformed the trial and appeals process into a public melodrama. The investigation, trial, and conviction of Robert Folkes galvanized civil rights activists, labor organizers, and community leaders into challenging the flawed judicial process and ultimately the death penalty in Oregon, serving as a catalyst for civil rights activism that bridged rural and urban divides. The Color of Night will appeal to “true crime” aficionados, and to anyone interested in the history of race and labor relations, working conditions, community priorities, and attitudes toward the death penalty in the first half of the 20th century. [less]

$24.95
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Dangerous Subjects

Kenneth R. Coleman

2017    240 Pages    (Oregon State University Press)

DDC: 305.8009795    LCC: E185.93.O7 C65

OCLC: 983824368    LCCN: 2017024582    ISBN 13: 9780870719042    ISBN 10: 0870719041

Dangerous Subjects describes the life and times of James D. Saules, a black sailor who was shipwrecked off the coast of Oregon and settled there in 1841. Before landing in Oregon, Saules traveled the world as a whaleman in the South Pacific and later as a crew member of the United States Exploring Expedition. Saules resided in the Pacific Northwest for just two years before a major wave of Anglo-American immigrants arrived in covered wagons.   In Oregon, Saules encountered a multiethnic [...]

Dangerous Subjects describes the life and times of James D. Saules, a black sailor who was shipwrecked off the coast of Oregon and settled there in 1841. Before landing in Oregon, Saules traveled the world as a whaleman in the South Pacific and later as a crew member of the United States Exploring Expedition. Saules resided in the Pacific Northwest for just two years before a major wave of Anglo-American immigrants arrived in covered wagons.   In Oregon, Saules encountered a multiethnic population already transformed by colonialism--in particular, the fur industry and Protestant missionaries. Once the Oregon Trail emigrants began arriving in large numbers, in 1843, Saules had to adapt to a new reality in which Anglo-American settlers persistently sought to marginalize and exclude black residents from the region. Unlike Saules, who adapted and thrived in Oregon's multiethnic milieu, the settler colonists sought to remake Oregon as a white man's country. They used race as shorthand to determine which previous inhabitants would be included and which would be excluded. Saules inspired and later had to contend with a web of black exclusion laws designed to deny black people citizenship, mobility, and land.   In Dangerous Subjects, Kenneth Coleman sheds light on a neglected chapter in Oregon's history. His book will be welcomed by scholars in the fields of western history and ethnic studies, as well as general readers interested in early Oregon and its history of racial exclusion. [less]

$19.95

Double Victory: How African American Women Broke Race and Gender Barriers to Help Win World War II (Women of Action)

Cheryl Mullenbach

2017    272 Pages    (Chicago Review Press)

DDC: 940.530820973    LCC: D810.N4

OCLC: 945390941    ISBN 13: 9781613735237    ISBN 10: 1613735235

2014 Amelia Bloomer Top Ten ListDouble Victory tells the stories of African American women who did extraordinary things to help their country during World War II. In these pages young readers meet a range of remarkable women: war workers, political activists, military women, volunteers, and entertainers. Some, such as Mary McLeod Bethune and Lena Horne, were celebrated in their lifetimes and are well known today. But many others fought discrimination at home and abroad in order to contribute to [...]

2014 Amelia Bloomer Top Ten ListDouble Victory tells the stories of African American women who did extraordinary things to help their country during World War II. In these pages young readers meet a range of remarkable women: war workers, political activists, military women, volunteers, and entertainers. Some, such as Mary McLeod Bethune and Lena Horne, were celebrated in their lifetimes and are well known today. But many others fought discrimination at home and abroad in order to contribute to the war effort yet were overlooked during those years and forgotten by later generations. Double Victory recovers the stories of these courageous women, such as Hazel Dixon Payne, the only woman to serve on the remote Alaska-Canadian Highway; Deverne Calloway, a Red Cross worker who led a protest at an army base in India; and Betty Murphy Phillips, the only black female overseas war correspondent. Offering a new and diverse perspective on the war and including source notes and a bibliography, Double Victory is an invaluable addition to any student’s or history buff’s bookshelf.  [less]

$12.99
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Force for Change, A

Kimberley Mangun

2010    384 Pages    (Oregon State University Press)

DDC: 323.092    LCC: F881.C36

OCLC: 995325240    LCCN: 2009052057    ISBN 13: 9780870715808    ISBN 10: 0870715801

A Force for Change is the first full-length study of the life and work of one of Oregon's most dynamic civil rights activists, Beatrice Morrow Cannady. Between 1912 and 1936, Cannady tirelessly promoted interracial goodwill and fought segregation and discrimination. She gave hundreds of lectures to high school and college students and shared her message with radio listeners across the Pacific Northwest. She was assistant editor, and later publisher, of The Advocate, Oregon's largest African [...]

A Force for Change is the first full-length study of the life and work of one of Oregon's most dynamic civil rights activists, Beatrice Morrow Cannady. Between 1912 and 1936, Cannady tirelessly promoted interracial goodwill and fought segregation and discrimination. She gave hundreds of lectures to high school and college students and shared her message with radio listeners across the Pacific Northwest. She was assistant editor, and later publisher, of The Advocate, Oregon's largest African American newspaper. Cannady was the first black woman to graduate from law school in Oregon, and the first to run for state representative. She held interracial teas in her home in Northeast Portland and protested repeated showings of the racist film The Birth of a Nation. And when the Ku Klux Klan swept into Oregon, she urged the governor to act quickly to protect black Oregonians' right to live and work without fear. Despite these accomplishments, Beatrice Cannady fell into obscurity when she left Oregon in the late 1930s. A Force for Change illuminates Cannady's key role in advocating for better race relations in Oregon in the early decades of the twentieth century. It describes her encounters with the period's leading black artists, editors, politicians, and intellectuals, including W. E. B. Du Bois, Langston Hughes, Oscar De Priest, Roland Hayes, and James Weldon Johnson. It dispels the myth that African Americans played little part in Oregon's history and it enriches our understanding of the black experience in Oregon and the civil rights movement across the country. Book jacket. [less]

$24.95
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Jumptown

Robert Dietsche

2005    288 Pages    (Oregon State University Press)

DDC: 781.650979549    LCC: ML3508.8.P6

OCLC: 58423135    LCCN: 2005006366    ISBN 13: 9780870711145    ISBN 10: 0870711148

A fascinating blend of music, politics, and social history, Jumptown sheds light on a time and place overlooked by histories of Portland and jazz. For a golden decade following World War II, jazz talent and musical activity flourished in Portland. A thriving African American neighborhood--that would soon be bulldozed for urban renewal--spawned a jazz heyday rarely rivaled on the West Coast. Such luminaries as Duke Ellington, Charlie Parker, Oscar Peterson, Dave Brubeck, and Wardell Gray [...]

A fascinating blend of music, politics, and social history, Jumptown sheds light on a time and place overlooked by histories of Portland and jazz. For a golden decade following World War II, jazz talent and musical activity flourished in Portland. A thriving African American neighborhood--that would soon be bulldozed for urban renewal--spawned a jazz heyday rarely rivaled on the West Coast. Such luminaries as Duke Ellington, Charlie Parker, Oscar Peterson, Dave Brubeck, and Wardell Gray headlined Portland clubs and traded chops with the up-and-coming local talent. The Dude Ranch. Lil' Sandy's McClendon's Rhythm Room. The Frat Hall. The Chicken Coop. The Uptown Ballroom. Jazz historian Bob Dietsche leads a guided tour of the main jazz spots--from supper club to dance hall--capturing the emotion, excitement, and energy of an evening on the town. His book for the first time collects hundreds of pieces of local jazz history--photographs, personal recollections, reviews, maps, handbills--to create "an anatomy of a jazz village." Dietsche's compendium of stories and moments brings to life the citizens of the jazz village--the musicians and dancers, the disc jockeys and promoters, the critics and music teachers, the club owners and patrons. Jumptown celebrates and preserves this rich cultural past and showcases its continuing influence. In an afterword, Lynn Darroch recaps the highlights in Portland jazz since 1968 and shows how "Portland's twenty-first-century jazz scene reflects the city's original golden age, and the spirit of the Avenue remains in the sounds of today." [less]

$24.95
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Mel Renfro

Bob Gill, Bob Lilly (Foreword by), Roger Staubach (Foreword by)

2015    298 Pages    (Inkwater Press)

DDC: 796.332092    LCC: GV939.R455

OCLC: 988900528    LCCN: 2015917057    ISBN 13: 9781629013008    ISBN 10: 1629013005

Mel Renfro: Forever a Cowboy, an authorized biography, relates the life journey of an early Cowboy legend. Unlike today, the salaries in the '60s were miniscule and the good players usually stayed with one team. When Mel Renfro was drafted by the Dallas Cowboys in 1964, the struggling team got one of the nation's top two-sport athletes. Not only was the native Oregonian multitalented in both football and track and field, he received high school and college All-American honors. If not for his [...]

Mel Renfro: Forever a Cowboy, an authorized biography, relates the life journey of an early Cowboy legend. Unlike today, the salaries in the '60s were miniscule and the good players usually stayed with one team. When Mel Renfro was drafted by the Dallas Cowboys in 1964, the struggling team got one of the nation's top two-sport athletes. Not only was the native Oregonian multitalented in both football and track and field, he received high school and college All-American honors. If not for his love for football, he may have been an Olympic decathlon medalist. After Mel arrived in Dallas, Coach Tom Landry recognized his talents and started him in the lineup. Mel responded by setting team records, and he was selected to play in the first of his ten consecutive Pro Bowls, becoming MVP in the 1970 game. Being a member of "Doomsday Defense I," the Cowboy defenders who played six years together from 1966-1971 and led the team to the Super Bowl VI win, was the highlight for Mel. His play as the best "shutdown" cornerback for years earned him the Cowboy Ring of Honor, and after an anxious 14-year wait, a Pro Football Hall of Fame induction in 1996. Forever a Cowboy also reveals Mel's human side, discussing how he dealt with his life-after-football and the struggles that came with it. But the completion of the loop as a Cowboy legend was Mel's selection to the Hall of Fame in 1996. Today, Mel still lives in Dallas and wears his two Super Bowl rings proudly. [less]

$26.95
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Portland Black Panthers: Empowering Albina and Remaking a City (V. Ethel Willis White Books), The

Lucas N. N. Burke, Judson L. Jeffries

2017    312 Pages    (University of Washington Press)

DDC: 322.420979549   

OCLC: 984605403    ISBN 13: 9780295742717    ISBN 10: 0295742712

Portland, Oregon, though widely regarded as a liberal bastion, also has struggled historically with ethnic diversity; indeed, the 2010 census found it to be "America's whitest major city." In early recognition of such disparate realities, a group of African American activists in the 1960s formed a local branch of the Black Panther Party in the city's Albina District to rally their community and be heard by city leaders. And as Lucas Burke and Judson Jeffries reveal, the Portland branch was quite [...]

Portland, Oregon, though widely regarded as a liberal bastion, also has struggled historically with ethnic diversity; indeed, the 2010 census found it to be "America's whitest major city." In early recognition of such disparate realities, a group of African American activists in the 1960s formed a local branch of the Black Panther Party in the city's Albina District to rally their community and be heard by city leaders. And as Lucas Burke and Judson Jeffries reveal, the Portland branch was quite different from the more famous―and infamous―Oakland headquarters. Instead of parading through the streets wearing black berets and ammunition belts, Portland's Panthers were more concerned with opening a health clinic and starting free breakfast programs for neighborhood kids. Though the group had been squeezed out of local politics by the early 1980s, its legacy lives on through the various activist groups in Portland that are still fighting many of the same battles.Combining histories of the city and its African American community with interviews with former Portland Panthers and other key players, this long-overdue account adds complexity to our understanding of the protracted civil rights movement throughout the Pacific Northwest. [less]

$24.95
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Remembering the Power of Words: The Life of an Oregon Activist, Legislator, and Community Leader (Women and Politics in the Pacific Northwest)

Avel Louise Gordly, Patricia A. Schecter, Melody Rose

2011    176 Pages    (Oregon State University Press)

DDC: 324.2092    LCC: F881.35.G67 A3

OCLC: 691203468    LCCN: 2010049231    ISBN 13: 9780870716041    ISBN 10: 0870716042

Remembering the Power of Words recounts the personal and professional journey of Avel Gordly, the first African-American woman elected to the Oregon State Senate. The book is a brave and honest telling of Gordly's life. She shares the challenges and struggles she faced growing up black in Portland in the 1950s and 1960s, as well as her determination to attend college, the dedication to activism that took her from Portland to Africa, and her eventual decision to run for a seat in the state [...]

Remembering the Power of Words recounts the personal and professional journey of Avel Gordly, the first African-American woman elected to the Oregon State Senate. The book is a brave and honest telling of Gordly's life. She shares the challenges and struggles she faced growing up black in Portland in the 1950s and 1960s, as well as her determination to attend college, the dedication to activism that took her from Portland to Africa, and her eventual decision to run for a seat in the state legislature.That words have power is a constant undercurrent in Gordly's account and a truth she learned early in life. "Growing up, finding my own voice," she writes, "was tied up with denying my voice or having it forcefully rejected and in all of that the memory of my father is very strong. To this day--and I am today a very experienced public speaker--preparation to speak takes a great deal of energy." That this memoir has its origins as an oral history is fitting since Gordly has used her voice, out loud, to teach and inspire others for so many years.Important as a biographical account of one significant Oregonian's story, the book also contributes "broader narratives touching on Black history (and Oregon's place within it), and most particularly the politics associated with being an African American woman," according to series editor Melody Rose.The inaugural volume in the Women and Politics in the Pacific Northwest Series (series editor, Melody Rose) [less]

$18.95
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Vanport (Images of America)

Zita Podany

2016    128 Pages    (Arcadia Publishing)

DDC: 979.549    LCC: F884.V36

OCLC: 949755078    LCCN: 2015942513    ISBN 13: 9781467134798    ISBN 10: 1467134791

Nestled in the floodplain between North Portland, Oregon, and Vancouver, Washington, a housing project was built to help house World War II shipyard workers. Its very name, Vanport, is derived from Vancouver and Portland. When the United States entered the war, the demand for ships and for workers to build those ships became a huge priority. Workers were recruited from all corners of the United States. Portland had a serious lodging shortage, so much so that these workers lived in cars, tents, [...]

Nestled in the floodplain between North Portland, Oregon, and Vancouver, Washington, a housing project was built to help house World War II shipyard workers. Its very name, Vanport, is derived from Vancouver and Portland. When the United States entered the war, the demand for ships and for workers to build those ships became a huge priority. Workers were recruited from all corners of the United States. Portland had a serious lodging shortage, so much so that these workers lived in cars, tents, parks, and whatever shelter could be found. Vanport, built in a little over a year to house them, was a city that did not sleep. In its heyday, Vanport was the second-largest city in Oregon with a population of over 40,000 residents. It was a city with many firsts. It was a city that touched many lives in a very short period of time. And on May 30, 1948, it was a city that disappeared just as quickly as it came into existence, leaving a legacy that will not soon be forgotten. [less]

$21.99
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