libib

Menu

Tasting Flight of New Books


Tag List

ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZ#ALL
B
B

Black Woman in Green: Gloria Brown and the Unmarked Trail to Forest Service Leadership

Donna L. Sinclair, Gloria D. Brown, Laurie Mercier (Foreword by)

2020    208 Pages    (Oregon State University Press)

DDC: 634.9092    LCC: SD129.B8 A3

OCLC: 1126212523    LCCN: 2019050769    ISBN 13: 9780870710018    ISBN 10: 087071001X

From an unlikely beginning as an agency transcriptionist in her hometown of Washington, DC, Gloria Brown became the first African American woman to attain the rank of forest supervisor at the US Forest Service. As a young widow with three children, she transferred to Missoula, Montana, and embarked on a remarkable journey, ultimately leading the Siuslaw National Forest in Oregon and later the Los Padres in California. The story of Brown's career unfolds against the backdrop of a changing [...]

From an unlikely beginning as an agency transcriptionist in her hometown of Washington, DC, Gloria Brown became the first African American woman to attain the rank of forest supervisor at the US Forest Service. As a young widow with three children, she transferred to Missoula, Montana, and embarked on a remarkable journey, ultimately leading the Siuslaw National Forest in Oregon and later the Los Padres in California. The story of Brown's career unfolds against the backdrop of a changing government agency and a changing society. As scholars awaken to the racist history of public land management and the ways that people of color have been excluded from contemporary notions of nature and wilderness, Brown's story provides valuable insight into the roles that African Americans have carved out in the outdoors generally and in the field of environmental policy and public lands management specifically. Drawing on her powerful communication and listening skills, her sense of humor, and her willingness to believe in the basic goodness of humanity, Brown conducted civil rights trainings and shattered glass ceilings, all while raising her children alone. Written in an engaging and accessible style with historian Donna Sinclair, Brown's story provides a fascinating case study for public administration and contributes to a deeper understanding of the environmental and civil rights movements of the twentieth century, particularly the role that racial discrimination has played in national forests, parks, and other wilderness spaces. It also highlights issues of representation in the federal government, women's history, the history of the American West, and literature associated with African American experiences in predominately white societies.   [less]

$19.95
C
C

Clifford Gleason: The Promise of Paint

Roger Hull

2020    96 Pages    (Oregon State University Press)

OCLC: 1156335713    ISBN 13: 9781930957831    ISBN 10: 1930957831

Clifford Gleason (1913-1978), who grew up in Salem and spent his adult life in both Salem and Portland, was a talented and highly original artist whose work remains of keen interest to a small and loyal group of collectors and artists but whose accomplishments are less generally known than those of other Oregon mid-century artists. Clifford Gleason: The Promise of Paint serves as both an introduction and a definitive study of an "artist's artist," who until now has not received the sustained [...]

Clifford Gleason (1913-1978), who grew up in Salem and spent his adult life in both Salem and Portland, was a talented and highly original artist whose work remains of keen interest to a small and loyal group of collectors and artists but whose accomplishments are less generally known than those of other Oregon mid-century artists. Clifford Gleason: The Promise of Paint serves as both an introduction and a definitive study of an "artist's artist," who until now has not received the sustained attention that he and his work are due. It traces his career from the 1930s until the last months of his difficult life--difficult because of alcoholism, near poverty, and homosexuality in a repressive era. In paint, Gleason found the only realm in which he felt competent, confident, and successful; paint offered the promise of accomplishment. Roger Hull's knowledgeable text offers a chronological study combining biography, analysis of Gleason's artworks, and assessment of his place within the broader context of contemporary and Pacific Northwest art. Published in conjunction with an exhibition at the Hallie Ford Museum of Art at Willamette University, this richly illustrated monograph examines Gleason's identity as a modern artist as he responded to the rapid changes in artistic modernism from the late 1930s, when he studied with Louis Bunce at the Salem Federal Art Center, to the 1970s, when he rethought the legacy of Abstract Expressionism in works that are unique to him, visually beautiful and poetically expressive. [less]

$24.95
F
F

Facing the World: Defense Spending and International Trade in the Pacific Northwest Since World War II

Christopher P. Foss

2020    368 Pages    (Oregon State University Press)

DDC: 338.4735500979    LCC: HC107.A19

OCLC: 1126211508    ISBN 13: 9780870719905    ISBN 10: 0870719904

Before the Second World War, the states of Washington and Oregon were thinly populated economic backwaters of the United States. Even the major cities of Portland and Seattle were dependent on agricultural industries, especially timber, for their economic health. That all changed during World War II and the Cold War. By the dawn of the twenty-first century, the Pacific Northwest boasted a more diversified economy. Beer, tourism, and high tech moved in alongside timber and wheat as the region's [...]

Before the Second World War, the states of Washington and Oregon were thinly populated economic backwaters of the United States. Even the major cities of Portland and Seattle were dependent on agricultural industries, especially timber, for their economic health. That all changed during World War II and the Cold War. By the dawn of the twenty-first century, the Pacific Northwest boasted a more diversified economy. Beer, tourism, and high tech moved in alongside timber and wheat as the region's mainstay industries. In Washington, especially, a Cold War-driven military and national security state set up shop as an economic behemoth even as debates over the costs and consequences of the new Atomic Age raged. Facing the World highlights these changes, as well as the politicians, business leaders, and ordinary people who helped bring them about. At the center of the story, Senators Henry Jackson, Wayne Morse, Slade Gorton, and Mark Hatfield; Congressman Tom Foley; and Governor Vic Atiyeh worked diligently for a generation to transform the region from insular and backward to cosmopolitan and forward-looking. Aligning the region with national security and international trade policies, these politicians made the Pacific Northwest economy what it is today. Through extensive research in congressional and federal archives, historian Christopher P. Foss vividly brings to life the discussions, conflicts, and controversies that shaped this political era. Though it wasn't perfect, its fading legacy of leadership is a lesson for our own time. Facing the World will prove a valuable resource to historians, political scientists, and civic-minded residents of the Pacific Northwest. [less]

$27.95
H
H

Hops: Historic Photographs of the Oregon Hopscape

Kenneth I. Helphand

2020    200 Pages    (Oregon State University Press)

DDC: 633.8209795    LCC: SB317.H64

OCLC: 1142517092    ISBN 13: 9780870710179    ISBN 10: 0870710176

The craft brewing renaissance of recent decades has brought a renewed interest in hops. These vigorous vines, with their flavorful flowers, have long played a key role in beer making and in Oregon's agricultural landscape. This compendium of photographs offers a visual dive into the distinctive physical presence of hops in the state. From pickers and poles to cones and oasts, Kenneth I. Helphand brings the landscape and culture of hops to life. For much of the first half of the twentieth century [...]

The craft brewing renaissance of recent decades has brought a renewed interest in hops. These vigorous vines, with their flavorful flowers, have long played a key role in beer making and in Oregon's agricultural landscape. This compendium of photographs offers a visual dive into the distinctive physical presence of hops in the state. From pickers and poles to cones and oasts, Kenneth I. Helphand brings the landscape and culture of hops to life. For much of the first half of the twentieth century, Oregon was the leading producer of hops in the United States, with the Willamette Valley deemed "the garden spot of the world for the cultivation of hops." The author has scoured archives across the state to gather together images of the hops landscape in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. The photographs featured in Hops portray pickers of all backgrounds through different eras of agricultural practice. Here are children, nuns, families, immigrants, and college students in fields, hop driers, and tent camps. The photos range from the candid to the highly professional, including images from Dorothea Lange's iconic Farm Security Administration work. The 85 high-quality photographs are accompanied by captions that provide, variously, factual background, selections from oral histories, and visual guidance. A historical essay provides a short overview of the plant's history and the world of hop growing and picking.   [less]

$27.95
loading
Powered by Libib