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Accomplishing NAGPRA: Perspectives on the Intent, Impact, and Future of the Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act (First Peoples)

2013    296 Pages    (Oregon State University Press)

DDC: 344.73    LCC: KF4305.A924

OCLC: 870969959    LCCN: 2013013091    ISBN 13: 9780870717208    ISBN 10: 0870717200

Accomplishing NAGPRA reveals the day-to-day reality of implementing the Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act. The diverse contributors to this timely volume reflect the viewpoints of tribes, museums, federal agencies, attorneys, academics, and others invested in the landmark act.NAGPRA requires museums and federal agencies to return requested Native American cultural items to lineal descendants, culturally affiliated Indian tribes, and Native Hawai’ian organizations.  Since [...]

Accomplishing NAGPRA reveals the day-to-day reality of implementing the Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act. The diverse contributors to this timely volume reflect the viewpoints of tribes, museums, federal agencies, attorneys, academics, and others invested in the landmark act.NAGPRA requires museums and federal agencies to return requested Native American cultural items to lineal descendants, culturally affiliated Indian tribes, and Native Hawai’ian organizations.  Since the 1990 passage of the act, museums and federal agencies have made more than one million cultural items—and the remains of nearly forty thousand Native Americans—available for repatriation.Drawing on case studies, personal reflections, historical documents, and statistics, the volume examines NAGPRA and its grassroots, practical application throughout the United States.? Accomplishing NAGPRA will appeal to professionals and academics with an interest in cultural resource management, Indian and human rights law, Indigenous studies, social justice movements, and public policy. [less]

$24.95

Assimilation's Agent

Edwin L. Chalcraft, Cary C. Collins (Editor, Introduction by)

2007    368 Pages    (University of Nebraska Press)

DDC: 371.2001092    LCC: E97.65.N4

OCLC: 154690209    ISBN 13: 9780803222441    ISBN 10: 0803222440

Assimilation's Agent reveals the life and opinions of Edwin L. Chalcraft (1855-1943), a superintendent in the federal Indian boarding schools during the critical period of forced assimilation in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. Chalcraft was hired by the Office of Indian Affairs (now known as the Bureau of Indian Affairs) in 1883. During his nearly four decades of service, he worked at a number of Indian boarding schools and agencies, including the Chehalis Indian School in [...]

Assimilation's Agent reveals the life and opinions of Edwin L. Chalcraft (1855-1943), a superintendent in the federal Indian boarding schools during the critical period of forced assimilation in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. Chalcraft was hired by the Office of Indian Affairs (now known as the Bureau of Indian Affairs) in 1883. During his nearly four decades of service, he worked at a number of Indian boarding schools and agencies, including the Chehalis Indian School in Oakville, Washington; Puyallup Indian School in Tacoma, Washington; Chemawa Indian School in Salem, Oregon; Wind River Indian School in Wind River, Wyoming; Jones Male Academy in Hartshorne, Oklahoma; and Siletz Indian Agency in Oregon. In this memoir Chalcraft discusses the Grant peace policy, the inspection system, allotment, the treatment of tuberculosis, corporal punishment, alcoholism, and patronage. Extensive coverage is also given to the Indian Shaker Church and the government's response to this perceived threat to assimilation. Assimilation's Agent illuminates the sometimes treacherous political maneuverings and difficult decisions faced by government officials at Indian boarding schools. It offers a rarely heard and today controversial "top-down" view of government policies to educate and assimilate Indians. Drawing on a large collection of unpublished letters and documents, Cary C. Collins's introduction and notes furnish important historical background and context. Assimilation's Agent illustrates the government's long-term program for dealing with Native peoples and the shortcomings of its approach during one of the most consequential eras in the long and often troubled history of American Indian and white relations. [less]

$29.95
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Badger and Coyote Were Neighbors: Melville Jacobs on Northwest Indian Myths and Tales (Northwest Readers)

William R. Seaburg

2000    320 Pages    (Oregon State University Press)

DDC: 398.2089970795    LCC: E78.O6

OCLC: 43311653    LCCN: 00008046    ISBN 13: 9780870714733    ISBN 10: 0870714732

An anthropologist and folklorist, Melville Jacobs (1902-71) made it his life work to preserve and interpret the fast-disappearing languages and traditions of the Indian peoples of Oregon and Washington. This volume presents an introduction to Jacobs's seminal research and provides an engaging selection of the myths and tales that he painstakingly collected.

An anthropologist and folklorist, Melville Jacobs (1902-71) made it his life work to preserve and interpret the fast-disappearing languages and traditions of the Indian peoples of Oregon and Washington. This volume presents an introduction to Jacobs's seminal research and provides an engaging selection of the myths and tales that he painstakingly collected. [less]

$24.95

Being Cowlitz: How One Tribe Renewed and Sustained Its Identity

Christine Dupres

2016    176 Pages    (University of Washington Press)

DDC: 979.700497943    LCC: E99.C877

OCLC: 931798255    ISBN 13: 9780295995571    ISBN 10: 0295995572

Without a recognized reservation or homeland, what keeps an Indian tribe together? How can members of the tribe understand their heritage and pass it on to younger generations? For Christine Dupres, a member of the Cowlitz tribe of southwestern Washington State, these questions were personal as well as academic. In Being Cowlitz: How One Tribe Renewed and Sustained Its Identity, what began as the author's search for her own history opened a window into the practices and narratives that sustained [...]

Without a recognized reservation or homeland, what keeps an Indian tribe together? How can members of the tribe understand their heritage and pass it on to younger generations? For Christine Dupres, a member of the Cowlitz tribe of southwestern Washington State, these questions were personal as well as academic. In Being Cowlitz: How One Tribe Renewed and Sustained Its Identity, what began as the author's search for her own history opened a window into the practices and narratives that sustained her tribe's identity even as its people were scattered over several states. Dupres argues that the best way to understand a tribe is through its stories. From myths and spiritual traditions defining the people's relationship to the land to the more recent history of cultural survival and engagement with the U.S. government, Dupres shows how stories are central to the ongoing process of forming a Cowlitz identity. Through interviews and profiles of political leaders, Dupres reveals the narrative and rhetorical strategies that protect and preserve the memory and culture of the tribe. In the process, she creates a blueprint for cultural preservation that current and future Cowlitz tribal leaders―as well as other indigenous activists―can use to keep tribal memories alive. [less]

$25.00

Black Indians: A Hidden Heritage

William Loren Katz

2012    272 Pages    (Atheneum Books for Young Readers)

DDC: 970.004043    LCC: E98.R28

OCLC: 769868216    LCCN: 2012372174    ISBN 13: 9781442446373    ISBN 10: 1442446374

The compelling account of how two heritages united in their struggle to gain freedom and equality in America—now updated with new content!The first paths to freedom taken by runaway slaves led to Native American villages. There, black men and women found acceptance and friendship among our country’s original inhabitants. Though they seldom appear in textbooks and movies, the children of Native- and African-American marriages helped shape the early days of the fur trade, added a new dimension [...]

The compelling account of how two heritages united in their struggle to gain freedom and equality in America—now updated with new content!The first paths to freedom taken by runaway slaves led to Native American villages. There, black men and women found acceptance and friendship among our country’s original inhabitants. Though they seldom appear in textbooks and movies, the children of Native- and African-American marriages helped shape the early days of the fur trade, added a new dimension to frontier diplomacy, and made a daring contribution to the fight for American liberty.Since its original publication, William Loren Katz’s Black Indians has remained the definitive work on a long, arduous quest for freedom and equality. This new edition features a new cover and includes updated information about a neglected chapter in American history. [less]

$13.99

Bringing Indians to the Book (A Mclellan Book)

Albert Furtwangler

2005    232 Pages    (University of Washington Press)

DDC: 266.0089970795    LCC: E78.N77

OCLC: 57549286    LCCN: 2005002225    ISBN 13: 9780295985237    ISBN 10: 0295985232

In 1831 a delegation of Northwest Indians reportedly made the arduous journey from the shores of the Pacific to the banks of the Missouri in order to visit the famous explorer William Clark. This delegation came, however, not on civic matters but on a religious quest, hoping, or so the reports ran, to discover the truth about the white men's religion. The story of this meeting inspired a drive to send missionaries to the Northwest. Reading accounts of these souls ripe for conversion, the [...]

In 1831 a delegation of Northwest Indians reportedly made the arduous journey from the shores of the Pacific to the banks of the Missouri in order to visit the famous explorer William Clark. This delegation came, however, not on civic matters but on a religious quest, hoping, or so the reports ran, to discover the truth about the white men's religion. The story of this meeting inspired a drive to send missionaries to the Northwest. Reading accounts of these souls ripe for conversion, the missionaries expected a warmer welcome than they received, and they recorded their subsequent disappointments and frustrations in their extensive journals, letters, and stories.Bringing Indians to the Book recounts the experiences of these missionaries and of the explorers on the Lewis and Clark Expedition who preceded them. Though they differed greatly in methods and aims, missionaries and explorers shared a crucial underlying cultural characteristic: they were resolutely literate, carrying books not only in their baggage but also in their most commonplace thoughts and habits, and they came west in order to meet, and attempt to change, groups of people who for thousands of years had passed on their memories, learning, and values through words not written, but spoken or sung aloud. It was inevitable that, in this meeting of literate and oral societies, ironies and misunderstandings would abound.A skilled writer with a keen ear for language, Albert Furtwangler traces the ways in which literacy blinded those Euro-American invaders, even as he reminds us that such bookishness is also our own.Albert Furtwangler is an independent scholar affiliated with Willamette University and professor emeritus, Mount Allison University. He is the author of Answering Chief Seattle and Acts of Discovery: Visions of America in the Lewis and Clark Journals."Furtwangler has produced an engaging and idiosyncratic analysis of the Protestant missionaries, one that deserves wide readership. There is much here that is simply wonderful." - Larry Cebula, author of Plateau Indians and the Quest for Spiritual Power, 1700-1850 "This is a very impressive book and likely to be a widely consulted and influential contribution to Western history." - Jarold Ramsey, author of Reading the Fire: The Traditional Indian Literatures of America [less]

$25.00
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Carry Forth the Stories

Rodney Frey

2017    276 Pages    (Washington State University Press)

DDC: 305.897    LCC: E98.F6 F74

OCLC: 967189474    LCCN: 2016047761    ISBN 13: 9780874223484    ISBN 10: 0874223482

Seasoned anthropologist/ethnographer Rodney Frey offers personal and professional insights into the power and value of storytelling gleaned from more than forty years of working successfully with indigenous peoples. He frames his "ethnographic memoir" as "the quest of an ethnographer to learn from his hosts and engage in collaborative, applied, ethical-based research, writing, and classroom pedagogy." He addresses cultural property rights, tribal review, and giving back to host communities, [...]

Seasoned anthropologist/ethnographer Rodney Frey offers personal and professional insights into the power and value of storytelling gleaned from more than forty years of working successfully with indigenous peoples. He frames his "ethnographic memoir" as "the quest of an ethnographer to learn from his hosts and engage in collaborative, applied, ethical-based research, writing, and classroom pedagogy." He addresses cultural property rights, tribal review, and giving back to host communities, along with indigenous learning styles, perspectives, and knowledge. His collaborative research projects with the Crow, Coeur d'Alene, Nez Perce, and Warm Springs tribes offer a model for others seeking to work with Native communities. In Carry Forth the Stories, Frey intertwines stories gathered from interviews, oral histories, and elders. He also shares facets of his own cancer journey seeking therapy from both Native and Western healing traditions. Book jacket. [less]

$29.95

Caw Pawa Laakni, They Are Not Forgotten: Sahaptian Place Names Atlas of the Cayuse, Umatilla, and Walla Walla

Eugene S. Hunn

2010    256 Pages    (University of Washington Press)

DDC: 910.309795    LCC: E78.O6 H86

OCLC: 489003177    LCCN: 2014014089    ISBN 13: 9780295990262    ISBN 10: 0295990260

Caw Pawa Laakni, They Are Not Forgotten draws from the knowledge of Native and non-Native elders and scholars to present a compelling account of interactions between a homeland and its people. A project of the Tamástslikt Cultural Institute at the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Reservation, the atlas presents descriptions of 400 place names. Narrative enriches the many maps in the book to paint a picture of a way of life that provides context for interpreting pre-contact communities. This [...]

Caw Pawa Laakni, They Are Not Forgotten draws from the knowledge of Native and non-Native elders and scholars to present a compelling account of interactions between a homeland and its people. A project of the Tamástslikt Cultural Institute at the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Reservation, the atlas presents descriptions of 400 place names. Narrative enriches the many maps in the book to paint a picture of a way of life that provides context for interpreting pre-contact communities. This assemblage of cultural memory and meaning echoes a record that has all but disappeared from common knowledge. --For this atlas, traditional knowledge and institutional knowledge was circulated, shared, and formalized as a text-based narrative. Many of the accounts come from the individuals who traveled on horseback, lived in and saw the areas listed, and possessed a level of knowledge that cannot be replicated in this day. In presenting these place names, the Tribes strive to ensure the vitality of this communal knowledge into the future.The atlas provides a balanced understanding of regional history. Places named in the Indian languages are juxtaposed with sites central to the colonial period, such as those described by Lewis and Clark and given to fur-trading posts, missions, and those along the route of the Oregon Trail. The atlas adds a needed and vivid Indian perspective to the written history of Oregon and the West.Eugene S. Hunn is professor of anthropology at the University of Washington. Other contributors are E. Thomas Morning Owl, Jennifer Karson-Engum, Phillip E. Cash Cash, Daniel B. Haug, Roberta L. Conner, John M. Chess, and Modesta J. Minthorn. [less]

$29.95

Cayuse Indians, The

Robert H. Ruby, John Arthur Brown

1972    414 Pages    (University of Oklahoma Press)

DDC: 970.3    LCC: E99.C32

OCLC: 60423868    LCCN: 2006615800    ISBN 13: 9780806137001    ISBN 10: 0806137002

In this book, Robert H. Ruby and John A. Brown tell the story of the Cayuse people, from their early years through the nineteenth century, when the tribe was forced to move to a reservation. First published in 1972, this expanded edition is published in 2005 in commemoration of the sesquicentennial of the treaty between the Cayuse, Umatilla, and Walla Walla Confederated Tribes and the U.S. government on June 9, 1855, as well as the bicentennial of Lewis and Clark’s visit to the tribal homeland [...]

In this book, Robert H. Ruby and John A. Brown tell the story of the Cayuse people, from their early years through the nineteenth century, when the tribe was forced to move to a reservation. First published in 1972, this expanded edition is published in 2005 in commemoration of the sesquicentennial of the treaty between the Cayuse, Umatilla, and Walla Walla Confederated Tribes and the U.S. government on June 9, 1855, as well as the bicentennial of Lewis and Clark’s visit to the tribal homeland in 1805 and 1806. Volume 120 in The Civilization of the American Indian Series [less]

$29.95

Cedar: Tree of Life to the Northwest Coast Indians

Hilary Stewart

1995    192 Pages    (University of Washington Press)

DDC: 634.97568    LCC: E78.N78

OCLC: 456139364    LCCN: 84015156    ISBN 13: 9780295974484    ISBN 10: 0295974486

From the giant cedar of the rainforest came a wealth of raw materials vital to the way of life, art and culture of the early First Nations people of the Northwest Coast.All parts of the cedar tree had many uses. From the wood, skilled men made ocean-going canoes, massive post-and- beam houses, monumental carved poles that declared history, rights and lineage, and powerful dance masks. Women dextrously wove the inner bark into mats and baskets, plied it into ocordage and netting or processed it [...]

From the giant cedar of the rainforest came a wealth of raw materials vital to the way of life, art and culture of the early First Nations people of the Northwest Coast.All parts of the cedar tree had many uses. From the wood, skilled men made ocean-going canoes, massive post-and- beam houses, monumental carved poles that declared history, rights and lineage, and powerful dance masks. Women dextrously wove the inner bark into mats and baskets, plied it into ocordage and netting or processed it into soft, warn, water-repellent clothing. They also made the strong withes into heavy-duty rope and wove the roots into watertight baskets.Hilary Stewart explains, through her vivid descriptions, 550 detailed drawings and 50 photographs, the tools and techniques used, as well as the superbly crafted objects and their uses--all in the context of daily and ceremonial life. Anecdotes, oral history and the accounts of early explorers, traders, missionaries and native elders highlight the text. [less]

$29.95

Chief Joseph & the Flight of the Nez Perce: The Untold Story of an American Tragedy

Kent Nerburn

2006    448 Pages    (HarperOne)

DDC: 979.5004974124    LCC: E99.N5

OCLC: 138004859    ISBN 13: 9780061136085    ISBN 10: 0061136085

Hidden in the shadow cast by the great western expeditions of Lewis and Clark lies another journey every bit as poignant, every bit as dramatic, and every bit as essential to an understanding of who we are as a nation -- the 1,800-mile journey made by Chief Joseph and eight hundred Nez Perce men, women, and children from their homelands in what is now eastern Oregon through the most difficult, mountainous country in western America to the high, wintry plains of Montana. There, only forty miles [...]

Hidden in the shadow cast by the great western expeditions of Lewis and Clark lies another journey every bit as poignant, every bit as dramatic, and every bit as essential to an understanding of who we are as a nation -- the 1,800-mile journey made by Chief Joseph and eight hundred Nez Perce men, women, and children from their homelands in what is now eastern Oregon through the most difficult, mountainous country in western America to the high, wintry plains of Montana. There, only forty miles from the Canadian border and freedom, Chief Joseph, convinced that the wounded and elders could go no farther, walked across the snowy battlefield, handed his rifle to the U.S. military commander who had been pursuing them, and spoke his now-famous words, "From where the sun now stands, I will fight no more forever."The story has been told many times, but never before in its entirety or with such narrative richness. Drawing on four years of research, interviews, and 20,000 miles of travel, Nerburn takes us beyond the surrender to the captives' unlikely welcome in Bismarck, North Dakota, their tragic eight-year exile in Indian Territory, and their ultimate return to the Northwest. Nerburn reveals the true, complex character of Joseph, showing how the man was transformed into a myth by a public hungry for an image of the noble Indian and how Joseph exploited the myth in order to achieve his single goal of returning his people to their homeland.Chief Joseph & the Flight of the Nez Perce is far more than the story of a man and a people. It is a grand saga of a pivotal time in our nation's history. Its pages are alive with the presence of Lewis and Clark, General William Tecumseh Sherman, General George Armstrong Custer, and Sitting Bull. Its events brush against the California Gold Rush, the Civil War, the great western pioneer migration, and the building of the telegraph and the transcontinental railroad. Once you have read this groundbreaking work, you will never look at Chief Joseph, the American Indian, or our nation's westward journey in the same way again. [less]

$17.99

Chiefs and Change in the Oregon Country: Indian Relations at Fort Nez Percés, 1818-1855, Volume 2

Theodore Stern

1996    428 Pages    (Oregon State University Press)

DDC: 979.7    LCC: E78.C64 S73

OCLC: 659344720    LCCN: 97144580    ISBN 13: 9780870713897    ISBN 10: 0870713892

The second and concluding volume in Stern's acclaimed study of the relationships between Plateau Indians and the white fur traders, missionaries, and settlers who entered their world.

The second and concluding volume in Stern's acclaimed study of the relationships between Plateau Indians and the white fur traders, missionaries, and settlers who entered their world. [less]

$39.95

Children of Grace

Bruce Hampton

2002    407 Pages    (University of Nebraska Press)

DDC: 973.8    LCC: E83.877.H36

OCLC: 249003043    LCCN: 2002020312    ISBN 13: 9780803273344    ISBN 10: 0803273347

Although the Nez Perce (Nee-Me-Poo) Indians gave instrumental help to Lewis and Clark on their famous expedition, they were rewarded by decades of invasive treaties and encroachment upon their homeland. In June 1877, the Nez Perce struck back and were soon swept into one of the most devastating Indian wars in American history. The conflict culminated in an epic twelve-hundred-mile chase as the U.S. Army pursued some eight hundred Nez Perce men, women, and children, who tried to fight their way [...]

Although the Nez Perce (Nee-Me-Poo) Indians gave instrumental help to Lewis and Clark on their famous expedition, they were rewarded by decades of invasive treaties and encroachment upon their homeland. In June 1877, the Nez Perce struck back and were soon swept into one of the most devastating Indian wars in American history. The conflict culminated in an epic twelve-hundred-mile chase as the U.S. Army pursued some eight hundred Nez Perce men, women, and children, who tried to fight their way to freedom in Canada. In this enthralling account of the Nez Perce War, Bruce Hampton brings to life unforgettable characters from both sides of the conflict--warriors and women, common soldiers and celebrated generals. Looking Glass, White Bird, the legendary Chief Joseph, and fewer than three hundred warriors waged a bloody guerilla war against a modernized American army commanded by such famous generals as William Tecumseh Sherman, Nelson Miles, Oliver Otis Howard, and Philip Sheridan. Hampton also gives voice to the Native Americans from other tribes who helped the U.S. Army block the escape of the Nez Perce to Canada. [less]

$24.95

Chinook Indians: Traders of the Lower Columbia River (Civilization of the American Indian), The

Dr. Robert H. Ruby M.D., John A. Brown

1988    372 Pages    (University of Oklahoma Press)

DDC: 970.00497    LCC: E99.C57

OCLC: 1958350    ISBN 13: 9780806121079    ISBN 10: 0806121076

The Chinook Indians, who originally lived at the mouth of the Columbia River in present-day Oregon and Washington, were experienced traders long before the arrival of white men to that area. When Captain Robert Gray in the ship Columbia Rediviva, for which the river was named, entered the Columbia in 1792, he found the Chinooks in an important position in the trade system between inland Indians and those of the Northwest Coast. The system was based on a small seashell, the dentalium, as the [...]

The Chinook Indians, who originally lived at the mouth of the Columbia River in present-day Oregon and Washington, were experienced traders long before the arrival of white men to that area. When Captain Robert Gray in the ship Columbia Rediviva, for which the river was named, entered the Columbia in 1792, he found the Chinooks in an important position in the trade system between inland Indians and those of the Northwest Coast. The system was based on a small seashell, the dentalium, as the principal medium of exchange.The Chinooks traded in such items as sea otter furs, elkskin armor which could withstand arrows, seagoing canoes hollowed from the trunks of giant trees, and slaves captured from other tribes. Chinook women held equal status with the men in the trade, and in fact the women were preferred as traders by many later ships' captains, who often feared and distrusted the Indian men.The Chinooks welcomed white men not only for the new trade goods they brought, but also for the new outlets they provided Chinook goods, which reached Vancouver Island and as far north as Alaska. The trade was advantageous for the white men, too, for British and American ships that carried sea otter furs from the Northwest Coast to China often realized enormous profits.Although the first white men in the trade were seamen, land-based traders set up posts on the Columbia not long after American explorers Lewis and Clark blazed the trail from the United States to the Pacific Northwest in 1805. John Jacob Astor's men founded the first successful white trading post at Fort Astoria, the site of today's Astoria, Oregon, and the North West Company and the Hudson's Bay Company soon followed into the territory.As more white men moved into the area, the Chinooks began to lose their favored position as middlemen in the trade. Alcohol; new diseases such as smallpox, influenza, and venereal disease; intertribal warfare; and the growing number of white settlers soon led to the near extinction of the Chinooks. By 1&51, when the first treaty was made between them and the United States government, they were living in small, fragmented bands scattered throughout the territory.Today the Chinook Indians are working to revive their tribal traditions and history and to establish a new tribal economy within the white man's system. [less]

$29.95

Chinook Resilience

Jon D. Daehnke, Tony A. Johnson (Foreword by)

2017    256 Pages    (University of Washington Press)

DDC: 979.5004    LCC: E99.C57 D34

OCLC: 982373769    LCCN: 2017017192    ISBN 13: 9780295742267    ISBN 10: 0295742267

The Chinook Indian Nation--whose ancestors lived along both shores of the lower Columbia River, as well as north and south along the Pacific coast at the river's mouth--continue to reside near traditional lands. Because of its nonrecognized status, the Chinook Indian Nation often faces challenges in its efforts to claim and control cultural heritage and its own history and to assert a right to place on the Columbia River. Chinook Resilience is a collaborative ethnography of how the Chinook [...]

The Chinook Indian Nation--whose ancestors lived along both shores of the lower Columbia River, as well as north and south along the Pacific coast at the river's mouth--continue to reside near traditional lands. Because of its nonrecognized status, the Chinook Indian Nation often faces challenges in its efforts to claim and control cultural heritage and its own history and to assert a right to place on the Columbia River. Chinook Resilience is a collaborative ethnography of how the Chinook Indian Nation, whose land and heritage are under assault, continues to move forward and remain culturally strong and resilient. Jon Daehnke focuses on Chinook participation in archaeological projects and sites of public history as well as the tribe's role in the revitalization of canoe culture in the Pacific Northwest. This lived and embodied enactment of heritage, one steeped in reciprocity and protocol rather than documentation and preservation of material objects, offers a tribally relevant, forward-looking, and decolonized approach for the cultural resilience and survival of the Chinook Indian Nation, even in the face of federal nonrecognition. [less]

$30.00

Chinookan Peoples of the Lower Columbia

2015    464 Pages    (University of Washington Press)

DDC: 979.54    LCC: E99.C58

OCLC: 1019977053    ISBN 13: 9780295995236    ISBN 10: 0295995238

Chinookan peoples have lived on the Lower Columbia River for millennia. Today they are one of the most significant Native groups in the Pacific Northwest, although the Chinook Tribe is still unrecognized by the United States government. In Chinookan Peoples of the Lower Columbia River, scholars provide a deep and wide-ranging picture of the landscape and resources of the Chinookan homeland and the history and culture of a people over time, from 10,000 years ago to the present. They draw on [...]

Chinookan peoples have lived on the Lower Columbia River for millennia. Today they are one of the most significant Native groups in the Pacific Northwest, although the Chinook Tribe is still unrecognized by the United States government. In Chinookan Peoples of the Lower Columbia River, scholars provide a deep and wide-ranging picture of the landscape and resources of the Chinookan homeland and the history and culture of a people over time, from 10,000 years ago to the present. They draw on research by archaeologists, ethnologists, scientists, and historians, inspired in part by the discovery of several Chinookan village sites, particularly Cathlapotle, a village on the Columbia River floodplain near the Portland-Vancouver metropolitan area. Their accumulated scholarship, along with contributions by members of the Chinook and related tribes, provides an introduction to Chinookan culture and research and is a foundation for future work. [less]

$30.00
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Deadliest Indian War in the West

Gregory Michno

2007    380 Pages    (Caxton Press)

DDC: 978.02    LCC: E83.864

OCLC: 802057611    LCCN: 2007023865    ISBN 13: 9780870044601    ISBN 10: 0870044605

Gregory Michno gives readers the first comprehensive look at the Natives, soldiers, and settlers who clashed on the high desert of Idaho, Nevada, Utah, Oregon, and Northern California in the Snake War, which claimed more lives than any other western Indian war.

Gregory Michno gives readers the first comprehensive look at the Natives, soldiers, and settlers who clashed on the high desert of Idaho, Nevada, Utah, Oregon, and Northern California in the Snake War, which claimed more lives than any other western Indian war. [less]

$18.95

Death of Celilo Falls

Katrine Barber

2005    272 Pages    (University of Washington Press)

DDC: 979.5    LCC: E78.O6 B37

OCLC: 842286122    LCCN: 2005017103    ISBN 13: 9780295985466    ISBN 10: 0295985461

For thousands of years, Pacific Northwest Indians fished, bartered, socialized, and honored their ancestors at Celilo Falls, part of a nine-mile stretch of the Long Narrows on the Columbia River. Although the Indian community of Celilo Village survives to this day as Oregon's oldest continuously inhabited town, with the construction of The Dalles Dam in 1957, traditional uses of the river were catastrophically interrupted. Most non-Indians celebrated the new generation of hydroelectricity and [...]

For thousands of years, Pacific Northwest Indians fished, bartered, socialized, and honored their ancestors at Celilo Falls, part of a nine-mile stretch of the Long Narrows on the Columbia River. Although the Indian community of Celilo Village survives to this day as Oregon's oldest continuously inhabited town, with the construction of The Dalles Dam in 1957, traditional uses of the river were catastrophically interrupted. Most non-Indians celebrated the new generation of hydroelectricity and the easy navigability of the river "highway" created by the dam, but Indians lost a sustaining center to their lives when Celilo Falls was inundated. Death of Celilo Falls is a story of ordinary lives in extraordinary circumstances, as neighboring communities went through tremendous economic, environmental, and cultural change in a brief period. Katrine Barber examines the negotiations and controversies that took place during the planning and construction of the dam and the profound impact the project had on both the Indian community of Celilo Village and the non-Indian town of The Dalles, intertwined with local concerns that affected the entire American West: treaty rights, federal Indian policy, environmental transformation of rivers, and the idea of "progress." [less]

$24.95

Dismembered

David E. Wilkins, Shelly Hulse Wilkins

2017    224 Pages    (University of Washington Press)

DDC: 342.7308    LCC: KIE2140.W55

OCLC: 961358053    LCCN: 2016049328    ISBN 13: 9780295741581    ISBN 10: 0295741589

While the number of federally recognized Native nations in the United States are increasing, the population figures for existing tribal nations are declining. This depopulation is not being perpetrated by the federal government, but by Native governments that are banishing, denying, or disenrolling Native citizens at an unprecedented rate. Since the 1990s, tribal belonging has become more of a privilege than a sacred right. Political and legal dismemberment has become a national phenomenon with [...]

While the number of federally recognized Native nations in the United States are increasing, the population figures for existing tribal nations are declining. This depopulation is not being perpetrated by the federal government, but by Native governments that are banishing, denying, or disenrolling Native citizens at an unprecedented rate. Since the 1990s, tribal belonging has become more of a privilege than a sacred right. Political and legal dismemberment has become a national phenomenon with nearly eighty Native nations, in at least twenty states, terminating the rights of indigenous citizens. The first comprehensive examination of the origins and significance of tribal disenrollment, Dismembered examines this disturbing trend, which often leaves the disenrolled tribal members with no recourse or appeal. At the center of the issue is how Native nations are defined today and who has the fundamental rights to belong. By looking at hundreds of tribal constitutions and talking with both disenrolled members and tribal officials, the authors demonstrate the damage this practice is having across Indian Country and ways to address the problem. [less]

$25.00

Dividing the Reservation

Nicole Tonkovich

2016    344 Pages    (Washington State University Press)

DDC: 305.80092    LCC: GN21.F54 A3

OCLC: 953175411    LCCN: 2016023035    ISBN 13: 9780874223446    ISBN 10: 087422344X

Alice Cunningham Fletcher was both formidable and remarkable. A pioneering ethnologist who penetrated occupations dominated by men, she was the first woman to hold an endowed chair at Harvard¿s Peabody Museum of American Archaeology and Ethnology--during a time the institution did not admit female students. She helped write the Dawes General Allotment Act of 1887 that reshaped American Indian policy, and became one of the first women to serve as a federal Indian agent, working with the Omahas, [...]

Alice Cunningham Fletcher was both formidable and remarkable. A pioneering ethnologist who penetrated occupations dominated by men, she was the first woman to hold an endowed chair at Harvard¿s Peabody Museum of American Archaeology and Ethnology--during a time the institution did not admit female students. She helped write the Dawes General Allotment Act of 1887 that reshaped American Indian policy, and became one of the first women to serve as a federal Indian agent, working with the Omahas, the Winnebagos, and finally the Nez Perces. Charged with supervising the daunting task of resurveying, verifying, and assigning nearly 757,000 acres of the Nez Perce Reservation, Fletcher also had to preserve land for transportation routes and restrain white farmers and stockmen who were claiming prime properties. She sought to "give the best lands to the best Indians," but was challenged by the Idaho terrain, the complex ancestries of the Nez Perces, and her own misperceptions about Native life. A commanding presence, Fletcher worked from a specialized tent that served as home and office, traveling with copies of laws, rolls of maps, and blank plats. She spent four summers on the project, completing close to 2,000 allotments. This book is a collection of letters and diaries Fletcher wrote during this work. Her writing illuminates her relations with the key players, as well as her internal conflicts over dividing the reservation. Taken together, these documents offer insight into how federal policy was applied, resisted, and amended in this early application of the Dawes General Allotment Act. [less]

$29.95
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Earth Is Weeping: The Epic Story of the Indian Wars for the American West, The

Peter Cozzens

2017    592 Pages    (Vintage)

DDC: 978    LCC: E83.866.C69

OCLC: 970680863    LCCN: 2017448712    ISBN 13: 9780307948182    ISBN 10: 0307948188

Winner of the Gilder Lehrman Prize for Military HistoryAfter the Civil War the Indian Wars would last more than three decades, permanently altering the physical and political landscape of America. Peter Cozzens gives us both sides in comprehensive and singularly intimate detail. He illuminates the intertribal strife over whether to fight or make peace; explores the dreary, squalid lives of frontier soldiers and the imperatives of the Indian warrior culture; and describes the ethical quandaries [...]

Winner of the Gilder Lehrman Prize for Military HistoryAfter the Civil War the Indian Wars would last more than three decades, permanently altering the physical and political landscape of America. Peter Cozzens gives us both sides in comprehensive and singularly intimate detail. He illuminates the intertribal strife over whether to fight or make peace; explores the dreary, squalid lives of frontier soldiers and the imperatives of the Indian warrior culture; and describes the ethical quandaries faced by generals who often sympathized with their native enemies. In dramatically relating bloody and tragic events as varied as Wounded Knee, the Nez Perce War, the Sierra Madre campaign, and the Battle of the Little Bighorn, we encounter a pageant of fascinating characters, including Custer, Sherman, Grant, and a host of officers, soldiers, and Indian agents, as well as great native leaders such as Crazy Horse, Sitting Bull, Geronimo, and Red Cloud and the warriors they led.The Earth Is Weeping is a sweeping, definitive history of the battles and negotiations that destroyed the Indian way of life even as they paved the way for the emergence of the United States we know today.A Smithsonian Top History Book of 2016Finalist for the Western Writers of America 2017 Spur Award in Best Western Historical Nonfiction [less]

$20.00

Earth Is Weeping: The Epic Story of the Indian Wars for the American West, The

Peter Cozzens

2016    576 Pages    (Knopf)

DDC: 978.02    LCC: E83.866

OCLC: 930364284    LCCN: 2015044077    ISBN 13: 9780307958044    ISBN 10: 0307958043

  Bringing together a pageant of fascinating characters including Custer, Sherman, Grant, and a host of other military and political figures, as well as great native leaders such as Crazy Horse, Sitting Bull, Geronimo, and Red Cloud, The Earth is Weeping—lauded by Booklist as “a beautifully written work of understanding and compassion”—is the fullest account to date of how the West was won…and lost. With the end of the Civil War, the nation recommenced its expansion onto traditional [...]

  Bringing together a pageant of fascinating characters including Custer, Sherman, Grant, and a host of other military and political figures, as well as great native leaders such as Crazy Horse, Sitting Bull, Geronimo, and Red Cloud, The Earth is Weeping—lauded by Booklist as “a beautifully written work of understanding and compassion”—is the fullest account to date of how the West was won…and lost. With the end of the Civil War, the nation recommenced its expansion onto traditional Indian tribal lands, setting off a wide-ranging conflict that would last more than three decades. In an exploration of the wars and negotiations that destroyed tribal ways of life even as they made possible the emergence of the modern United States, Peter Cozzens gives us both sides in comprehensive and singularly intimate detail. He illuminates the encroachment experienced by the tribes and the tribal conflicts over whether to fight or make peace, and explores the squalid lives of soldiers posted to the frontier and the ethical quandaries faced by generals who often sympathized with their native enemies. [less]

$35.00

Encounters with the People

Dennis Baird (Editor, Compiled by), Diane Mallickan (Editor, Compiled by), William R. Swagerty (Editor, Compiled by)

2015    544 Pages    (Washington State University Press)

DDC: 979.5004    LCC: E99.N5 E53

LCCN: 2014039431    ISBN 13: 9780874223309    ISBN 10: 087422330X

Organized both chronologically and thematically, Encounters with the People is an edited, annotated compilation of unique primary sources related to Nez Perce history¿ Native American oral histories, diary excerpts, military reports, maps, and more. Generous elders shared their collective memory of carefully-guarded stories passed down through multiple generations, beginning with early Nimiipuu/Euro-American contact and extending until just after the Treaty of 1855 held at Walla Walla. The [...]

Organized both chronologically and thematically, Encounters with the People is an edited, annotated compilation of unique primary sources related to Nez Perce history¿ Native American oral histories, diary excerpts, military reports, maps, and more. Generous elders shared their collective memory of carefully-guarded stories passed down through multiple generations, beginning with early Nimiipuu/Euro-American contact and extending until just after the Treaty of 1855 held at Walla Walla. The editors scoured archives, federal document repositories, and museums in search of little-known documents related to regional cultural and environmental history¿most published for the first time or found only in obscure sources. Part of the Voices from Nez Perce Country series, this essential reference work includes a thorough, up-to-date, annotated bibliography. [less]

$50.00
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Feeding the Ancestors: Tlingit Carved Horn Spoons (Peabody Museum Collections Series)

Anne-Marie Victor-Howe

2007    128 Pages    (Peabody Museum Press)

DDC: 736.6    LCC: E99.T6

OCLC: 81943759    LCCN: 2007004296    ISBN 13: 9780873654036    ISBN 10: 087365403X

Feeding the Ancestors presents an exquisite group of carved spoons from the Pacific Northwest that resides in the collections of Harvard's Peabody Museum of Archaeology and Ethnology. Carved from the horns of mountain goats and Dall sheep, and incorporating elements of abalone shell and metal, most of the spoons were collected in Alaska in the late nineteenth century and were made and used by members of the Tlingit tribe. Hillel Burger's beautiful color photographs reveal every nuance [...]

Feeding the Ancestors presents an exquisite group of carved spoons from the Pacific Northwest that resides in the collections of Harvard's Peabody Museum of Archaeology and Ethnology. Carved from the horns of mountain goats and Dall sheep, and incorporating elements of abalone shell and metal, most of the spoons were collected in Alaska in the late nineteenth century and were made and used by members of the Tlingit tribe. Hillel Burger's beautiful color photographs reveal every nuance of the carvers' extraordinary artistry. Anne-Marie Victor-Howe introduces the collectors and describes the means by which these and other ethnographic objects were acquired. In the process, she paints a vivid picture of the "Last Frontier" just before and shortly after the United States purchased Alaska. A specialist in the ethnography of the Native peoples of the Northwest Coast, Victor-Howe provides a fascinating glimpse into these aboriginal subsistence cultures as she explains the manufacture and function of traditional spoons. Her accounts of the clan stories associated with specific carvings and of the traditional shamanic uses of spoons are the result of extensive consultation with Tlingit elders, scholars, and carvers. Feeding the Ancestors is the first scholarly study of traditional feast spoons and a valuable contribution to our knowledge of Pacific Northwest Coast peoples and their art. [less]

$25.00

Finding Chief Kamiakin: The Life and Legacy of a Northwest Patriot

Richard D. Scheuerman, Michael O. Finley

2008    204 Pages    (Washington State Univ Pr)

DDC: 979.70049741270092    LCC: E99.Y2

OCLC: 231588995    LCCN: 2008029025    ISBN 13: 9780874222975    ISBN 10: 0874222974

Born to T'siyiak, a champion horse racer and Com-mus-ni, the daughter of Chief Wiya´wiikt, Kamiakin from an early age helped relatives tend his family's expanding herds. He wintered with relatives in tule mat lodges in the Kittitas and Ahtanum valleys. Other times of the year he shared in communal spring root gathering, summertime salmon fishing, and autumn berry-picking and hunting. Kamiakin adhered to ancestral tradition. Alone as an adolescent on Mount Rainier's icy [...]

Born to T'siyiak, a champion horse racer and Com-mus-ni, the daughter of Chief Wiya´wiikt, Kamiakin from an early age helped relatives tend his family's expanding herds. He wintered with relatives in tule mat lodges in the Kittitas and Ahtanum valleys. Other times of the year he shared in communal spring root gathering, summertime salmon fishing, and autumn berry-picking and hunting. Kamiakin adhered to ancestral tradition. Alone as an adolescent on Mount Rainier's icy heights, he dreamt of the Buffalo's power, completing his quest for a guardian spirit. Muscular and sinewy, he became a skilled horse racer and competitor in feats of agility. He married and established a camp on Ahtanum Creek, raising potatoes, squash, pumpkins, and corn in irrigated gardens. As Kamiakin matured, he rose in prominence among the Yakamas; leaders of both Sahaptin and Salish bands sought his counsel. Through personal aptitude as well as family bonds, he emerged as one of the Plateau region's most influential chiefs. He cautiously welcomed White newcomers and sought to learn beneficial aspects of their culture. His dignified manner impressed the Whites he knew--traders, missionaries, and soldiers. In the 1840s, the arrival of unprecedented numbers of Oregon Trail immigrants stirred a cataclysmic upheaval threatening his people's retention of lands and their ancient customs. On May 29, 1855, the Walla Walla Treaty Council commenced with a gathering of government officials and Plateau headmen, while some 5,000 Indians camped nearby. Two weeks later, Kamiakin signed the Yakima Treaty of 1855 with great reluctance; but he also resolved to resist threats to his people's freedoms and transgressions on their lifeways. Finding Chief Kamiakin is his saga. [less]

$34.95

Folk-Tales of the Coast Salish

Thelma Adamson (Editor), William R. Seaburg (Introduction by), Laurel B. Sercombe (Introduction by)

2009    472 Pages    (University of Nebraska Press)

DDC: 398.209797    LCC: GR1

OCLC: 456839452    LCCN: 2009031101    ISBN 13: 9780803226685    ISBN 10: 0803226683

First published in 1934, this collection of tales was recorded and edited by Thelma Adamson (1901 - 83), a student of Franz Boas and one of the first women to conduct ethnographic fieldwork in the Pacific Northwest. A major contribution to our knowledge of western Washington Salish oral traditions, Folk-Tales of the Coast Salish contains 190 texts from nineteen consultants - most collected in English or in English translation. The 155 stories represent Upper Chehalis and Cowlitz Salish narrative [...]

First published in 1934, this collection of tales was recorded and edited by Thelma Adamson (1901 - 83), a student of Franz Boas and one of the first women to conduct ethnographic fieldwork in the Pacific Northwest. A major contribution to our knowledge of western Washington Salish oral traditions, Folk-Tales of the Coast Salish contains 190 texts from nineteen consultants - most collected in English or in English translation. The 155 stories represent Upper Chehalis and Cowlitz Salish narrative traditions, primarily myths and tales, and constitute the largest published body of oral literature for either of these groups. Adamson included as many as four variants of the same tale-type, and Adele Froehlich prepared a useful forty-three-page section of abstracts with comparative notes from eight regional text collections. Folk-Tales of the Coast Salish provides a rich data source for those interested in the content and comparative analysis of Native texts told in English. With few exceptions, the tales refer to the time "when all the animals were people." This new edition enhances Adamson's seminal work with the inclusion of a biographical sketch of Adamson and of her friend and noted ethnomusicologist George Herzog, who produced the appended music transcriptions. [less]

$28.95

Following the Nez Perce Trail, 2nd ed: A Guide to the Nee-Me-Poo National Historic Trail with Eyewitness Accounts

Cheryl Wilfong

2005    493 Pages    (Oregon State University Press)

DDC: 979.682    LCC: F597

OCLC: 61240594    LCCN: 2005022602    ISBN 13: 9780870711176    ISBN 10: 0870711172

Winding through Montana, Wyoming, Idaho, and Oregon, the Nez Perce Historical Trail covers a lot of ground and a lot of history. Cheryl Wilfong's guide does the same, providing practical nuts & bolts information on how, when, and where to navigate the trail, plus a chronological history of the flight of the Nez Perce. It's a well-balanced combination of details both pragmatic and poetic. How much ground you choose to cover depends on your time, stamina, and type of vehicle. There [...]

Winding through Montana, Wyoming, Idaho, and Oregon, the Nez Perce Historical Trail covers a lot of ground and a lot of history. Cheryl Wilfong's guide does the same, providing practical nuts & bolts information on how, when, and where to navigate the trail, plus a chronological history of the flight of the Nez Perce. It's a well-balanced combination of details both pragmatic and poetic. How much ground you choose to cover depends on your time, stamina, and type of vehicle. There are backroads, jeep trails, private ranch roads, and hiking trails, and there are highway routes that'll get you close without sending you off among the sagebrush. Even avid Trail buffs, however, rarely do more than a segment or two at a time, and the guide is structured such that you can pick up any leg of the journey and know easily where you are, logistically as well as in terms of "The Story:quot;--a 20-page history of the Nez Perce Nation from "time beyond memory" to 1885 when the Nez Perce were all consigned to reservations. The Trail is split into 13 segments, each with its own chronology, terrain, and travel plan. The fifth leg, for example, is the Lolo Trail, from Kamiah, Idaho to Lolo, Montana. Over a century ago it saw the journey of Nez Perce from July 1 through July 16, 1877, including the Battle of Clearwater. Covering 56 miles and with alternative routes for Mainstream, Adventurous, and Intrepid travelers (Wilfong's classifications for people in RVs, cars, and jeeps), the chapter contains specific history of the trail segment, snippets of first-hand accounts, and detailed directions as to which gravel road to take to the Mount Idaho Cemetery or the Clearwater Battleground site. Beautifully written and educational, this is a lovely book for both historians and travelers. --Stephanie Gold [less]

$29.95

Forlorn Hope

John D. McDermott

1978    232 Pages    (Caxton Press)

DDC: 973.83   

OCLC: 53082999    ISBN 13: 9780870044359    ISBN 10: 0870044354

Distributed by the University of Nebraska Press for Caxton Press The Nez Perce victory at White Bird Canyon boosted their confidence as warriors and made them believe they could prevail in their fight to keep their homeland. The confrontation was the spark that ignited a four-month, 1,000-mile running battle that ended with Chief Joseph's surrender at Bear Paw, in Montana, less than 100 miles from safety.

Distributed by the University of Nebraska Press for Caxton Press The Nez Perce victory at White Bird Canyon boosted their confidence as warriors and made them believe they could prevail in their fight to keep their homeland. The confrontation was the spark that ignited a four-month, 1,000-mile running battle that ended with Chief Joseph's surrender at Bear Paw, in Montana, less than 100 miles from safety. [less]

$15.95
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Gift of Knowledge / Ttnúwit Átawish Nch'Inch'Imamík, The

Virginia R. Beavert, Janne L. Underriner (Editor)

2017    208 Pages    (University of Washington Press)

DDC: 979.7004    LCC: E99.Y2 B43

OCLC: 1019993862    LCCN: 2017007241    ISBN 13: 9780295741659    ISBN 10: 0295741651

The Gift of Knowledge / Ttnuwit Atawish Nch'inch'imamí is a treasure trove of material for those interested in Native American culture. Author Virginia Beavert grew up in a traditional, Indian-speaking household. Both her parents and her maternal grandmother were shamans, and her childhood was populated by people who spoke tribal dialects and languages: Nez Perce, Umatilla, Klikatat, and Yakima Ichishkíin. Her work on Native languages began at age twelve, when she met linguist Melville Jacobs [...]

The Gift of Knowledge / Ttnuwit Atawish Nch'inch'imamí is a treasure trove of material for those interested in Native American culture. Author Virginia Beavert grew up in a traditional, Indian-speaking household. Both her parents and her maternal grandmother were shamans, and her childhood was populated by people who spoke tribal dialects and languages: Nez Perce, Umatilla, Klikatat, and Yakima Ichishkíin. Her work on Native languages began at age twelve, when she met linguist Melville Jacobs while working for his student, Margaret Kendell. When Jacobs realized that Beavert was a fluent speaker of the Klikatat language, he taught her to read and write the orthography he had developed to record Klikatat myths. After a stint in the U.S. Air Force during World War II, Beavert went on to earn graduate degrees in education and linguistics, and she has contributed to numerous projects for the preservation of Native language and teachings. Beavert narrates highlights from her own life and presents cultural teachings, oral history, and stories (many in bilingual Ishishkíin-English format) about family life, religion, ceremonies, food gathering, and other aspects of traditional culture. [less]

$29.95

Guide to the Indian Tribes of the Pacific Northwest (Civilization of the American Indian), A

Dr. Robert H. Ruby M.D., John A. Brown, Cary C Collins

2010    464 Pages    (University of Oklahoma Press)

DDC: 979.501    LCC: E78.N77

OCLC: 557404302    LCCN: 2010008791    ISBN 13: 9780806140247    ISBN 10: 0806140240

The Native peoples of the Pacific Northwest inhabit a vast region extending from the Rocky Mountains to the Pacific Ocean, and from California to British Columbia. For more than two decades, A Guide to the Indian Tribes of the Pacific Northwest has served as a standard reference on these diverse peoples. Now, in the wake of renewed tribal self-determination, this revised edition reflects the many recent political, economic, and cultural developments shaping these Native communities.From such [...]

The Native peoples of the Pacific Northwest inhabit a vast region extending from the Rocky Mountains to the Pacific Ocean, and from California to British Columbia. For more than two decades, A Guide to the Indian Tribes of the Pacific Northwest has served as a standard reference on these diverse peoples. Now, in the wake of renewed tribal self-determination, this revised edition reflects the many recent political, economic, and cultural developments shaping these Native communities.From such well-known tribes as the Nez Perces and Cayuses to lesser-known bands previously presumed "extinct," this guide offers detailed descriptions, in alphabetical order, of 150 Pacific Northwest tribes. Each entry provides information on the history, location, demographics, and cultural traditions of the particular tribe.Among the new features offered here are an expanded selection of photographs, updated reading lists, and a revised pronunciation guide. While continuing to provide succinct histories of each tribe, the volume now also covers such contemporary—and sometimes controversial—issues as Indian gaming and NAGPRA. With its emphasis on Native voices and tribal revitalization, this new edition of the Guide to the Indian Tribes of the Pacific Northwest is certain to be a definitive reference for many years to come. [less]

$26.95
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Haa Shuká, Our Ancestors: Tlingit Oral Narratives (Classics Of Tlingit Oral Literature)

Nora Marks Dauenhauer, Richard Dauenhauer

1987    532 Pages    (University of Washington Press)

DDC: 398.2089970798    LCC: E99.T6

OCLC: 15224253    LCCN: 87002164    ISBN 13: 9780295964959    ISBN 10: 0295964952

These gripping and powerful prose narratives relate monumental events in the lives of the forebears of Tlingit clans, from the prehistoric migration to the coast of Southeast Alaska to the first contact with Europeans. The stories were recorded from the 1960s to the present by twelve tradition bearers who where passing down for future generations the accounts of haa shuka, which means "our ancestors." Their narratives tell of the origin of social and spiritual concepts and explain the [...]

These gripping and powerful prose narratives relate monumental events in the lives of the forebears of Tlingit clans, from the prehistoric migration to the coast of Southeast Alaska to the first contact with Europeans. The stories were recorded from the 1960s to the present by twelve tradition bearers who where passing down for future generations the accounts of haa shuka, which means "our ancestors." Their narratives tell of the origin of social and spiritual concepts and explain the complex relationships among members of a given clan to their relatives in other clans, to spirits of the land where the vents took place, to the spirits of departed ancestors, and to the spirits of various animals, including killer whale and bear.The focus here is on the stories and story tellers themselves, who lived amazingly different lives, reflecting in a small way the complexity of Tlingit life in the twentieth century, a period characterized by unprecedented political, economic, and social change. The stories were told in Tlingit and then transcribed from the tape recorded versions. The editors have attempted to write these stories the way they were told, and to then translate them into English keeping the unique Tlingit oral style.This book will be of interest to the general reader of Native American literature and comparative literature, as well as to folklorists, linguists, and anthropologists. Of special interest to linguist will be the new texts (transcribed in three different Tlingit dialects) containing many hitherto unattested grammatical forms. [less]

$38.00

Half-Sun on the Columbia: A Biography of Chief Moses (The Civilization of the American Indian Series)

Dr. Robert H. Ruby M.D., John A. Brown

1995    416 Pages    (University of Oklahoma Press)

DDC: 979.703092    LCC: E99.S55

OCLC: 31376542    LCCN: 94037092    ISBN 13: 9780806127385    ISBN 10: 0806127384

Winner of the Pacific Northwest Booksellers Association Regional AwardChief Moses (Sulktalthscosum or Half-Sun) was chief of the Columbias, a Salish-speaking people of the mid Columbia River area in what is now the state of Washington. This award-winning biography by Robert Ruby and John Brown situates Moses in the opening of the Northwest and subsequent Indian-white relations, between 1850 and 1898. Early in life Moses had won a name for himself battling whites, but with the maturity and [...]

Winner of the Pacific Northwest Booksellers Association Regional AwardChief Moses (Sulktalthscosum or Half-Sun) was chief of the Columbias, a Salish-speaking people of the mid Columbia River area in what is now the state of Washington. This award-winning biography by Robert Ruby and John Brown situates Moses in the opening of the Northwest and subsequent Indian-white relations, between 1850 and 1898. Early in life Moses had won a name for himself battling whites, but with the maturity and responsibilities of chieftainship, he became a diplomat and held his united tribe at peace in spite of growing white encroachment. He resisted the call to arms of his friend Chief Joseph of the Nez Percés, whose heroic campaign ended in defeat and exile to Indian Territory. Their friendship persisted, however, and after Joseph's return to the Northwest, the two lived out their lives on the reservation, sharing their frustrations and uniting their voices in complaint. [less]

$24.95

Happy Canyon: A History of the World’s Most Unique Indian Pageant & Wild West Show

Rebeca Fletcher Waggoner

2016    408 Pages    (Arcadia Publishing)

DDC: 791.849079569    LCC: GV1833.W34

OCLC: 945745710    LCCN: 2016936006    ISBN 13: 9781467136778    ISBN 10: 1467136778

For over a century, the Happy Canyon show has brought together families, friends and strangers to witness a joyous celebration of local history. Originally staged in 1914 by Roy Raley, the all-volunteer show presents a live retelling of Pendleton s founding that honors both the beauty of tribal life and the spirit of the Old West. Today, the show is truly a family affair, and many performers and organizers are descendants of those early actors and crew. Author Becky Fletcher Waggoner delivers a [...]

For over a century, the Happy Canyon show has brought together families, friends and strangers to witness a joyous celebration of local history. Originally staged in 1914 by Roy Raley, the all-volunteer show presents a live retelling of Pendleton s founding that honors both the beauty of tribal life and the spirit of the Old West. Today, the show is truly a family affair, and many performers and organizers are descendants of those early actors and crew. Author Becky Fletcher Waggoner delivers a detailed, loving view of the show s history, illustrated with beautiful photography and fascinating archival photos that join past and present." [less]

$34.99

Heroes and Heroines: Tlingit-Haida Legend

Mary Giraudo Beck

128 Pages    (Alaska Northwest Books)

DDC: 398.2    LCC: E99.H2 B43

OCLC: 19847788    LCCN: 89014931    ISBN 13: 9780882403342    ISBN 10: 0882403346

Over uncounted generations the Tlingits and Haidas of Southeast Alaska developed a spoken literature as robust and distinctive as their unique graphic art style, and passed it from the old to the young to ensure the continuity of their culture.  Even today when the people gather, now under lamplight rather than the flickering glow from the central fire pit, the ancient myths and legends are told and retold, and they still reinforce the unity of the lineage, and clan and the culture.  [...]

Over uncounted generations the Tlingits and Haidas of Southeast Alaska developed a spoken literature as robust and distinctive as their unique graphic art style, and passed it from the old to the young to ensure the continuity of their culture.  Even today when the people gather, now under lamplight rather than the flickering glow from the central fire pit, the ancient myths and legends are told and retold, and they still reinforce the unity of the lineage, and clan and the culture.  Mary Beck has selected nine of the ancient myths and legends from the oral literature that are authentic for one group or another from this region. [less]

$12.99

Honne, the Spirit of the Chehalis

George Sanders, Katherine Van Winkle Palmer (Editor), Jay Miller (Introduction by)

2012    242 Pages    (University of Nebraska Press)

DDC: 398.209797    LCC: E99.C45 P2

OCLC: 884691511    LCCN: 2012031665    ISBN 13: 9780803271500    ISBN 10: 0803271506

Honne, the Spirit of the Chehalis embodies a narrative tour de force that interweaves episodes (that stand alone in ordinary tellings) into an integrated series of installments. This collection of Salish stories features the Changer's efforts to successively transform a proto-being or spirit into the present form of a named species (deer, owl, shark, sea otter, and others). Additional stories describe how the Changer allowed Bear or Ant to apportion day and night; permitted Frog to schedule [...]

Honne, the Spirit of the Chehalis embodies a narrative tour de force that interweaves episodes (that stand alone in ordinary tellings) into an integrated series of installments. This collection of Salish stories features the Changer's efforts to successively transform a proto-being or spirit into the present form of a named species (deer, owl, shark, sea otter, and others). Additional stories describe how the Changer allowed Bear or Ant to apportion day and night; permitted Frog to schedule tides; and taught humans how to cook meat and clams, hunt with a bow, dry berries, cure sickness, settle communities, and prepare for the afterworld.   These tales are told by George Sanders, a master storyteller whose family included chiefs of the Nisqually Indian tribe, which lives south of what is now Tacoma, Washington. As part of the oral tradition, these stories were rarely heard by those outside the area until Katherine Van Winkle Palmer, daughter of the local doctor, collected them for posterity. Jay Miller introduces this new edition with a close look at the linguistic complexity of the region, which testifies to the rich diversity of the Americas before epidemics and dislocations took their devastating toll. By weaving together these masterful installments, Honne, the Spirit of the Chehalis provides an evocative example of interwoven Salish oral literature at its best. [less]

$17.95
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I Heard the Owl Call My Name

Margaret Craven

159 Pages    (Dell)

DDC: 813.54    LCC: PS3553.R277

OCLC: 6885551    LCCN: 500019    ISBN 13: 9780440343691    ISBN 10: 0440343690

Lexile:
1080L

The story of one man's discovery of the ultimate truths of life and love, courage and dignity, among the proud Indians of the Northwest.

The story of one man's discovery of the ultimate truths of life and love, courage and dignity, among the proud Indians of the Northwest. [less]

$6.99
 
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