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Art of the Northwest Coast

Aldona Jonaitis

2006    344 Pages    (University of Washington Press)

DDC: 704.03970795    LCC: E78.N78

OCLC: 68786655    LCCN: 2006013866    ISBN 13: 9780295986364    ISBN 10: 0295986360

Art of the Northwest Coast is a comprehensive survey of the Native arts of the Pacific Northwest Coast, from Puget Sound to Alaska and from prehistoric times to the present. Incorporating the region’s social history with the observations of anthropologists, historians of art, and Native peoples, this groundbreaking volume examines how the upheavals of European contact affected the development of a powerful traditional art. By exploring the distinct origins of each of the area’s [...]

Art of the Northwest Coast is a comprehensive survey of the Native arts of the Pacific Northwest Coast, from Puget Sound to Alaska and from prehistoric times to the present. Incorporating the region’s social history with the observations of anthropologists, historians of art, and Native peoples, this groundbreaking volume examines how the upheavals of European contact affected the development of a powerful traditional art. By exploring the distinct origins of each of the area’s linguistic groups and their histories, mythologies, and art forms, art historian Aldona Jonaitis reveals how a complex web of factors informed these groups’ varied responses to the changes and challenges brought about by contact with Europeans.The post-contact period has often been considered a time of decline for Native artistic traditions and techniques, but Jonaitis convincingly argues against this assumption. The traditions were not lost, she asserts, but rather were expressed in different ways. Forms such as tourist art – made expressly for sale rather than for community use – were for some the only outlets available in the trying, repressive years when Natives were deprived of their land, rights, and essential cultural expressions. While art made for community use was often judged "inferior" in quality to nineteenth-century creations, it still expressed the strong aesthetics of a surviving Native culture.Since the 1960s, Native artistic activity has flourished and is increasingly recognized as fine art rather than anthropological artifact. Repatriation of Native works of art from museums, a strong market for collectors and dealers, and a reaffirmation of traditional culture and heritage among Native communities all contribute to a vibrant field in which Native artists reflect their enduring cultures in works that explore many contemporary directions.Compellingly written and beautifully illustrated, Art of the Northwest Coast is a cornerstone addition to any library and essential reading for anyone interested in the art of Native cultures. [less]

$26.95
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Bill Reid and Beyond

Karen Duffek (Editor), Charlotte Townsend-Gault (Editor), Nika Collison (Foreword by), Ruth B. Phillips (Preface by)

2004    280 Pages    (University of Washington Press)

DDC: 730    LCC: E99.H2 B55

OCLC: 845659973    LCCN: 2003026884    ISBN 13: 9780295983769    ISBN 10: 0295983760

Bill Reid's work has long been acknowledged for its astute and eloquent analysis of Haida tradition, and for the paradox of making modern art from the old Haida stories. It helped to make the so-called renaissance of Northwest Coast Native art visible to all. Bill Reid and Beyond pays Reid the compliment of expanding on his own clear-eyed self-scrutiny as he came to stand for Native art and artists, more perhaps than he would have wished. The book's nineteen contributors write from many [...]

Bill Reid's work has long been acknowledged for its astute and eloquent analysis of Haida tradition, and for the paradox of making modern art from the old Haida stories. It helped to make the so-called renaissance of Northwest Coast Native art visible to all. Bill Reid and Beyond pays Reid the compliment of expanding on his own clear-eyed self-scrutiny as he came to stand for Native art and artists, more perhaps than he would have wished. The book's nineteen contributors write from many perspectives, breaking down boundaries between art history and anthropology, between academic and artist, between colleague and politician. Alert to the political, economic, and social events of Bill Reid's lifetime, which have radically changed the way in which Native art is produced and received, this book participates in the important ongoing debates about Native art, demonstrating vividly that the exchange of ideas can, like works of art, change people's minds. [less]

$38.00
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Columbia River Basketry: Gift of the Ancestors, Gift of the Earth (Samuel and Althea Stroum Books)

Mary Dodds Schlick

1994    248 Pages    (University of Washington Press)

DDC: 746.412089974    LCC: E78.C64

OCLC: 28677005    LCCN: 93030658    ISBN 13: 9780295972893    ISBN 10: 0295972890

Baskets made by the people of the mid-Columbia River are among the finest examples of Indian textile art in North America, and they are included in the collections of most major museums. The traditional designs and techniques of construction reveal a great artistic heritage that links modern basketmakers to their ancestors. Yet baskets are also everyday objects of a utilitarian nature that reveal much about mid-Columbia culture---a flat twined bag has greatest value when it is plump with dried [...]

Baskets made by the people of the mid-Columbia River are among the finest examples of Indian textile art in North America, and they are included in the collections of most major museums. The traditional designs and techniques of construction reveal a great artistic heritage that links modern basketmakers to their ancestors. Yet baskets are also everyday objects of a utilitarian nature that reveal much about mid-Columbia culture---a flat twined bag has greatest value when it is plump with dried roots, a coiled basket when full of huckleberries.In Columbia River Basketry, Mary Schlick writes about the weavers who at the time of European contact lived along the Columbia River from just above its confluence with the Yakima River westward to the vicinity of present-day Portland, Oregon, and Indian groups living along the river. She presents the baskets in the context of the lives of the people who created and used them. She also writes about the descendants of the early basket weavers, to whom basketry skills have been passed and from whom she herself learned to make baskets. Schlick blends mythology, personal reminiscences, materials, and basketry techniques.Written with deep understanding and appreciation of the artists and their work, Columbia River Basketry will be an inspirational sourcebook for basket weavers and other craftspeople. It will also serve as an invaluable reference for scholars, curators, and collectors in identifying, dating, and interpreting examples of Columbia River basketry. [less]

$34.95
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Echoes of the Ancients

2004    (Oregon Archaeological Society)

DDC: 979.01    LCC: E78.C63

OCLC: 649847238    LCCN: 2012286109    ISBN 13: 9780976480402    ISBN 10: 0976480409

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$16.00
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In the Spirit of the Ancestors: Contemporary Northwest Coast Art at the Burke Museum (Native Art of the Pacific Northwest: A Bill Holm Center)

2015    168 Pages    (University of Washington Press)

DDC: 704.03970795074797772    LCC: N6538.A4

OCLC: 907447860    ISBN 13: 9780295995212    ISBN 10: 0295995211

In the Spirit of the Ancestors celebrates the vitality of contemporary Pacific Northwest Coast art by showcasing a selection of objects from the Burke Museum's collection of more than 2,400 late-twentieth- and early-twenty-first-century Native American works.Essays focus on contemporary art while exploring the important historical precedents on which so many artists rely for training and inspiration. Margaret Blackman reflects on building one of the largest collections of Northwest Coast [...]

In the Spirit of the Ancestors celebrates the vitality of contemporary Pacific Northwest Coast art by showcasing a selection of objects from the Burke Museum's collection of more than 2,400 late-twentieth- and early-twenty-first-century Native American works.Essays focus on contemporary art while exploring the important historical precedents on which so many artists rely for training and inspiration. Margaret Blackman reflects on building one of the largest collections of Northwest Coast serigraphs, and Joe David reminisces about his artistic journey through mask-making. Shaun Peterson, Lisa Telford, and Evelyn Vanderhoop discuss the historical precedents for working in styles that were kept alive only by a few critical artists and are now making a comeback. Robin K. Wright explores the history of box drums and their revival. Emily Moore discusses the repatriation of two stolen house posts and proposes a new concept of "propatriation" to describe the resulting commissioning of contemporary posts to take their place. Kathryn Bunn-Marcuse explores the power of adornment and how clothing, jewelry, and personal adornments like tattooing express tribal and personal identity in ways both connected to the past and grounded in the present.The diversity of approaches presented by these contributors speaks to artists, collectors, academics, tribal communities, and all those interested in Pacific Northwest Coast art. Splendid color photographs of works never before published will delight everyone. [less]

$34.95

Indian Baskets of Northern California and Oregon (Indian Baskets of California and Oregon)

Ralph Shanks

2015    168 Pages    (Miwok Archeological Preserve of Marin)

DDC: 398    LCC: E98.B3

OCLC: 930797673    ISBN 13: 9780930268220    ISBN 10: 0930268229

Indian Baskets of Northern California and Oregon is a richly illustrated, detailed study of the Native American basketry of this fascinating region. The book is the result of decades of research by Ralph Shanks who is a careful scholar and delightful author.The book covers the basketry of the Yurok, Hupa, Karuk, Wiyot, Tolowa, Wintu, Yana, Atsugewi, and other California cultures.  It also details the baskets of Oregon peoples including the Klamath, Kalapuya, Wasco, Coos, Tillamook, Tututni, and [...]

Indian Baskets of Northern California and Oregon is a richly illustrated, detailed study of the Native American basketry of this fascinating region. The book is the result of decades of research by Ralph Shanks who is a careful scholar and delightful author.The book covers the basketry of the Yurok, Hupa, Karuk, Wiyot, Tolowa, Wintu, Yana, Atsugewi, and other California cultures.  It also details the baskets of Oregon peoples including the Klamath, Kalapuya, Wasco, Coos, Tillamook, Tututni, and others.The book features nearly 200 previously unpublished color photographs of baskets of Northern California and Oregon from museums and private collections in the United States and Europe. [less]

$39.95
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Looking at Indian Art of the Northwest Coast

Hilary Stewart

1979    112 Pages    (University of Washington Press)

DDC: 769.9795    LCC: E78.N78

OCLC: 4641568    LCCN: 78    ISBN 13: 9780295956459    ISBN 10: 0295956453

Bold, inventive and highly graphic, the indigenous art of the Northwest Coast is distinguished by its sophistication and complexity. It is also composed of basically simple elements, which, guided by a rich mythology, create images of striking power. This indispensable and beautifully illustrated book is the first to introduce everyone, from the casual observer to the serious collector of Northwest Coast prints, to the forms, cultural background and structures of this highly imaginative art. The [...]

Bold, inventive and highly graphic, the indigenous art of the Northwest Coast is distinguished by its sophistication and complexity. It is also composed of basically simple elements, which, guided by a rich mythology, create images of striking power. This indispensable and beautifully illustrated book is the first to introduce everyone, from the casual observer to the serious collector of Northwest Coast prints, to the forms, cultural background and structures of this highly imaginative art. The elements of style are introduced; the myths and legends which shape the motifs are interpreted; the stylistic differences between the major cultural groupings are defined and illustrated. Raven, Thunderbird, Killer Whale, Bear: all the traditional forms are here, deftly analyzed by a professional writer and artist who has a deep understanding of this powerful culture. [less]

$17.95
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Mythic Beings: Spirit Art of the Northwest Coast

Gary Wyatt

1999    144 Pages    (University of Washington Press)

DDC: 704.039707111    LCC: E78.B9

OCLC: 41086648    LCCN: 99022928    ISBN 13: 9780295977980    ISBN 10: 0295977981

Mythic Beings brings together 80 outstanding works by 20 contemporary artists that powerfully interpret Northwest Coast myths and legends. These works include totem poles, argillite sculptures, jewelry in silver and gold, carved and painted boxes, painted drums, and masks. They depict beings of the forest, sea, sky, and spirit worlds: Raven, Thunderbird, Salmon Bringer, Volcano Woman, and many more.Accompanying each work are a retelling of the myth associated with it and comments from the [...]

Mythic Beings brings together 80 outstanding works by 20 contemporary artists that powerfully interpret Northwest Coast myths and legends. These works include totem poles, argillite sculptures, jewelry in silver and gold, carved and painted boxes, painted drums, and masks. They depict beings of the forest, sea, sky, and spirit worlds: Raven, Thunderbird, Salmon Bringer, Volcano Woman, and many more.Accompanying each work are a retelling of the myth associated with it and comments from the artist on the myth’s meaning, as well as stories related to the creation of the work.Gary Wyatt’s introduction discusses the evolution of contemporary Northwest Coast art, touching on major international commissions and exhibitions, and landmark pieces. It also discusses the relevance of myth and legend in contemporary Native society, and the changes and interpretations that have been introduced over the past three decades. [less]

$28.95
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Native Arts of the Columbia Plateau

Susan E. Harless, High Desert Museum Staff

1998    176 Pages    (University of Washington Press)

DDC: 979.7    LCC: E78.C63 N37

OCLC: 845032605    LCCN: 97043827    ISBN 13: 9780295976730    ISBN 10: 029597673X

Colorfully beaded handbags, superbly tanned and decorated deerskin shirts, finely woven baskets, exquisitely beaded and fringed horse trappings -- these distinctive Native arts of the Columbia River Plateau have been overshadowed in the public eye by the arts of the Northwest Coast, Great Plains, and American Southwest. But Indians in the region where present-day Washington, Oregon, and Idaho share boundaries have for centuries combined function and beauty in the items they made for even the [...]

Colorfully beaded handbags, superbly tanned and decorated deerskin shirts, finely woven baskets, exquisitely beaded and fringed horse trappings -- these distinctive Native arts of the Columbia River Plateau have been overshadowed in the public eye by the arts of the Northwest Coast, Great Plains, and American Southwest. But Indians in the region where present-day Washington, Oregon, and Idaho share boundaries have for centuries combined function and beauty in the items they made for even the most mundane of uses, and their traditional arts are still vital today. This book brings overdue recognition to the artistry and craftsmanship of the Plateau Indians by focusing on the remarkable collection amassed by the late Doris Swayze Bounds, a banker in Hermiston, Oregon, who grew up with and deeply loved Native people and their culture. She was loved in return, and many of the nearly 1,000 Plateau items in her collection came to her as gifts from her Indian friends, who expressed their respect and affection through the time-honored tradition of gift-giving. Exposed to Euro-Americans relatively late, the Plateau Indians managed to retain many of their traditional lifeways of fishing, hunting, and gathering, as well as a vigorous ethic of generosity and respect for others. The pieces in the Bounds collection, which date mainly from the 1870s to the 1960s, reflect all these aspects of Plateau culture. They range from sturdy baskets made to hold roots or berries to elaborately beaded elkhide ?tail dresses? worn on festive occasions. In five essays, both Native and non-Native experts describe the art styles and the uses and cultural meanings of the items; two other recount Doris Bound?s life, collecting practices, and relationships with Native Americans. The essays are handsomely illustrated with items from the Bounds collection. This book offers and introduction to this visually stunning art tradition. [less]

$29.95

NORTHWEST COAST INDIAN ART (Native Art of the Pacific Northwest: A Bill Holm Center)

Bill Holm

2014    144 Pages    (University of Washington Press)

DDC: 704.03    LCC: E78.N78 H6

OCLC: 894339925    LCCN: 2014019719    ISBN 13: 9780295994277    ISBN 10: 0295994274

The 50th anniversary edition of this classic work on the art of Northwest Coast Indians now offers color illustrations for a new generation of readers along with reflections from contemporary Northwest Coast artists about the impact of this book. The masterworks of Northwest Coast Native artists are admired today as among the great achievements of the world's artists. The painted and carved wooden screens, chests and boxes, rattles, crest hats, and other artworks display the complex and [...]

The 50th anniversary edition of this classic work on the art of Northwest Coast Indians now offers color illustrations for a new generation of readers along with reflections from contemporary Northwest Coast artists about the impact of this book. The masterworks of Northwest Coast Native artists are admired today as among the great achievements of the world's artists. The painted and carved wooden screens, chests and boxes, rattles, crest hats, and other artworks display the complex and sophisticated northern Northwest Coast style of art that is the visual language used to illustrate inherited crests and tell family stories. In the 1950s Bill Holm, a graduate student of Dr. Erna Gunther, former Director of the Burke Museum, began a systematic study of northern Northwest Coast art. In 1965, after studying hundreds of bentwood boxes and chests, he published Northwest Coast Indian Art: An Analysis of Form. This book is a foundational reference on northern Northwest Coast Native art. Through his careful studies, Bill Holm described this visual language using new terminology that has become part of the established vocabulary that allows us to talk about works like these and understand changes in style both through time and between individual artists' styles. Holm examines how these pieces, although varied in origin, material, size, and purpose, are related to a surprising degree in the organization and form of their two-dimensional surface decoration. The author presents an incisive analysis of the use of color, line, and texture; the organization of space; and such typical forms as ovoids, eyelids, U forms, and hands and feet. The evidence upon which he bases his conclusions constitutes a repository of valuable information for all succeeding researchers in the field. [less]

$30.00

Northwest Coast Representations

Andreas Etges, Viola König, Peter Bolz, Rainer Hatoum, Tina Brüderlin

2014    256 Pages    (Dietrich Reimer)

DDC: 390    LCC: F851.N63

OCLC: 898048033    LCCN: 2015391407    ISBN 13: 9783496028581    ISBN 10: 3496028580

Celebrating Berlin's Ethnological Museum collaboration with the John F. Kennedy Institute for North American Studies of Freie Universit#65533;t Berlin, this volume catalogs the museum’s famous Northwest Coast collection. The collection includes 2,500 objects brought to Berlin in the late 19th century by the Norwegian explorer Adrian Jacobsen.

Celebrating Berlin's Ethnological Museum collaboration with the John F. Kennedy Institute for North American Studies of Freie Universit#65533;t Berlin, this volume catalogs the museum’s famous Northwest Coast collection. The collection includes 2,500 objects brought to Berlin in the late 19th century by the Norwegian explorer Adrian Jacobsen. [less]

$79.00
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Peoples of the Plateau: The Indian Photographs of Lee Moorhouse, 1898–1915 (The Western Legacies Series)

Steven L. Grafe

2006    224 Pages    (University of Oklahoma Press)

DDC: 979.701    LCC: E78.C63

OCLC: 60348865    LCCN: 2005041885    ISBN 13: 9780806137421    ISBN 10: 0806137428

The remarkable photographs in Peoples of the Plateau capture the lives of Pacific Northwest Indians at the turn of the twentieth century—and at a turning point in their own history.The Columbia River Plateau, in the interior Pacific Northwest, was populated for centuries by the Umatilla, Walla Walla, and Cayuse Indians. By the late nineteenth century, after the U.S. government had confined these peoples to a single reservation, their lives began to change irrevocably. Major Lee Moorhouse, a [...]

The remarkable photographs in Peoples of the Plateau capture the lives of Pacific Northwest Indians at the turn of the twentieth century—and at a turning point in their own history.The Columbia River Plateau, in the interior Pacific Northwest, was populated for centuries by the Umatilla, Walla Walla, and Cayuse Indians. By the late nineteenth century, after the U.S. government had confined these peoples to a single reservation, their lives began to change irrevocably. Major Lee Moorhouse, a businessman and former militia officer, served as an Indian agent during this period. Believing that the Indians he encountered were a “dying race,” Moorhouse was driven to collect their artifacts and, for posterity, take their photographs.Although he was not a professional photographer, Moorhouse produced more than 9,000 glass-plate negatives, one-third with Indians as his subjects. Although his works to some degree reflect a stereotypical view, they are an invaluable aid for tribal researchers and historians because they identify their subjects by name.This book marks the first major examination of Moorhouse and his work. Featuring eighty exquisite plates, it not only showcases Moorhouse’s extensive photographs but also tells the story of the man—about whom little is known—and of the world in which he lived and worked.  [less]

$29.95
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Return to the Land of the Head Hunters: Edward S. Curtis, the Kwakwaka'wakw, and the Making of Modern Cinema (Native Art of the Pacific Northwest: A Bill Holm Center)

2013    392 Pages    (University of Washington Press)

DDC: 971.1    LCC: GN347.R47

OCLC: 862787946    LCCN: 2013043531    ISBN 13: 9780295993447    ISBN 10: 0295993448

The first silent feature film with an "all Indian" cast and a surviving original orchestral score, Edward Curtis's 1914 In the Land of the Head Hunters was a landmark of early cinema. Influential but often neglected in historical accounts, this spectacular melodrama was an intercultural product of Curtis's encounter and collaboration with the Kwakwaka'wakw of British Columbia.In recognition of the film's centennial, and alongside the release of a restored version, Return to the Land of the Head [...]

The first silent feature film with an "all Indian" cast and a surviving original orchestral score, Edward Curtis's 1914 In the Land of the Head Hunters was a landmark of early cinema. Influential but often neglected in historical accounts, this spectacular melodrama was an intercultural product of Curtis's encounter and collaboration with the Kwakwaka'wakw of British Columbia.In recognition of the film's centennial, and alongside the release of a restored version, Return to the Land of the Head Hunters brings together leading anthropologists, Native American authorities, artists, musicians, literary scholars, and film historians to reassess the film and its legacy. The volume offers unique Kwakwaka'wakw perspectives on the film, accounts of its production and subsequent circulation, and evaluations of its depictions of cultural practice.Like his photographs, Curtis's motion picture was meant to document a supposedly vanishing race. But as this collection shows, the film is not simply an artifact of colonialist nostalgia. Resituated within film history and informed by a legacy of Kwakwaka'wakw participation and response, the movie offers dynamic evidence of ongoing cultural survival and transformation under shared conditions of modernity. [less]

$50.00

Robes of Power

Doreen Jensen, Polly Sargent

1986    96 Pages    (University of British Columbia Press)

DDC: 391.8    LCC: E78.N78

OCLC: 15339591    LCCN: 2012451251    ISBN 13: 9780774802642    ISBN 10: 0774802642

The button blanket is eye-catching, prestigious and treasured--one of the most spectacular embellishments to the Indian culture of the Northwest Coast and a unique form of graphic and narrative art. The traditional crest-style robe is the sister of the totem pole and, like the pole, proclaims hereditary rights, obligations and powers. Unlike the pole, about which countless books and papers have been written, the button blanket has no chroniclers. This is not only the first major publication to [...]

The button blanket is eye-catching, prestigious and treasured--one of the most spectacular embellishments to the Indian culture of the Northwest Coast and a unique form of graphic and narrative art. The traditional crest-style robe is the sister of the totem pole and, like the pole, proclaims hereditary rights, obligations and powers. Unlike the pole, about which countless books and papers have been written, the button blanket has no chroniclers. This is not only the first major publication to focus on button blankets but also the first oral history about them and their place in the culture of the Northwest Coast. Those interviewed include speakers form six of the seven major Northwest Coast Indian groups. Elders, designers, blanket makers and historians, each has a voice, but all do not conform tony one theory about ceremonial robe. Rather the book is a search for the truth about the historical and contemporary role and traditions of the blanket, as those relate to the past and present Indian way of life on the Pacific Northwest Coast. Robes of Power will make people aware that this traditional practice is dynamic and flourishing. It is a source of strength to the Indian artists who design the robes and to the hereditary chiefs and others who wear them. The book was produced in association with the University of British Columbia’s Museum of Anthropology and its " Robes of Power" exhibit. [less]

$34.95

Rock Art of the Oregon Country

James D. Keyser, George R. Poetschat

2010    (Oregon Archaeological Society)

DDC: 709.011309795    LCC: GN799.P4

OCLC: 660156236    LCCN: 2012286108    ISBN 13: 9780976480488    ISBN 10: 0976480484

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$16.00
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S'abadeb / The Gifts: Pacific Coast Salish Art and Artists

Barbara Brotherton

2008    240 Pages    (University of Washington Press)

DDC: 979.7    LCC: E99.S21 S34

OCLC: 271772066    LCCN: 2008024421    ISBN 13: 9780295988634    ISBN 10: 0295988630

S'abadeb, The Gifts captures the essence of Coast Salish culture through its artistry, oral traditions, and history. Developed in conjunction with the first extensive exhibition of the art and culture of the Coast Salish peoples of Washington State and British Columbia, the book traces the development of Salish art from prehistory to the present. Sculpture in wood, stone, and bone--including monumental house posts--as well as expertly crafted basketry, woven regalia, and contemporary works in [...]

S'abadeb, The Gifts captures the essence of Coast Salish culture through its artistry, oral traditions, and history. Developed in conjunction with the first extensive exhibition of the art and culture of the Coast Salish peoples of Washington State and British Columbia, the book traces the development of Salish art from prehistory to the present. Sculpture in wood, stone, and bone--including monumental house posts--as well as expertly crafted basketry, woven regalia, and contemporary works in glass, print media, and painting showcase a sweeping artistic tradition and its contemporary vibrant manifestations.S'abadeb is the Lushootseed term for “gifts” and invokes a principle at the heart of Salish sculpture: reciprocity, both in the public and spiritual domains. This richly symbolic word expresses the importance of giving gifts at potlatches, of giving thanks during first food ceremonies, of the creativity bestowed upon artists and other leaders, and of the roles of the master artists, oral historians, and cultural leaders in passing vital cultural information to the next generations. The theme of S'abadeb and practices of reciprocal exchange in Salish society are illuminated here through the intersection of art with ceremony, oral traditions, the land, and contemporary realities. [less]

$40.00

Souvenirs of the Fur Trade: Northwest Coast Indian Art and Artifacts Collected by American Mariners 1788-1844

Mary Malloy

2000    188 Pages    (Peabody Museum Press)

DDC: 704.03970711    LCC: E78.N78

OCLC: 46421246    LCCN: 00131639    ISBN 13: 9780873658331    ISBN 10: 0873658337

American mariners made more than 175 voyages to the Northwest Coast during the half-century after the ships Columbia and Washington pioneered the route from Boston in 1787. Although obtaining sea otter pelts for the China trade was the original purpose of the voyages, the art and culture of Northwest Coast Indians so intrigued and fascinated American sailors that the collecting of ethnographic artifacts became an important secondary trade. The Indians traded masks, hats, paddles, pipes, [...]

American mariners made more than 175 voyages to the Northwest Coast during the half-century after the ships Columbia and Washington pioneered the route from Boston in 1787. Although obtaining sea otter pelts for the China trade was the original purpose of the voyages, the art and culture of Northwest Coast Indians so intrigued and fascinated American sailors that the collecting of ethnographic artifacts became an important secondary trade. The Indians traded masks, hats, paddles, pipes, fishhooks, spoons, clothing, and canoe models from their canoes to the decks of Yankee vessels. In this act of exchange, the artifacts moved from one world to another--first to shipboard, and later to the "cabinets of curiosities" of learned societies in Massachusetts, where many of them found homes. The objects were the first examples of Northwest Coast Indian material culture to enter American museums, and they influenced perceptions of Northwest Coast Indian people and their complex cultures. By carefully researching the records of ten institutions and the shipboard journals of more than a dozen mariners, Mary Malloy has brought details about these early collections together for the first time. From utilitarian objects to artistic masterpieces, these souvenirs tell a story of commerce and cultural exchange that reached across the continent during the period when Americans were first beginning to look westward. [less]

$35.00

Spirit Faces: Contemporary Masks of the Northwest Coast (Series No Longer Used)

Gary Wyatt

1998    144 Pages    (University of Washington Press)

DDC: 730.89972    LCC: E78.N78

OCLC: 231450828    LCCN: 94003360    ISBN 13: 9780295977584    ISBN 10: 0295977582

Spirit Faces presents an outstanding collection of 75 masks by 23 contemporary Native American artists. These breathtakingly beautiful and powerful masks, all illustrated in color, depict creatures such as Eagle or Killer Whale, natural elements and forces such as Moon or Weather, humans, and supernatural beings such as Thunderbird or the Chief of the Undersea.Masks are an important part of ceremonial life on the Northwest Coast; they make the supernatural world visible and bring it to life in [...]

Spirit Faces presents an outstanding collection of 75 masks by 23 contemporary Native American artists. These breathtakingly beautiful and powerful masks, all illustrated in color, depict creatures such as Eagle or Killer Whale, natural elements and forces such as Moon or Weather, humans, and supernatural beings such as Thunderbird or the Chief of the Undersea.Masks are an important part of ceremonial life on the Northwest Coast; they make the supernatural world visible and bring it to life in dance dramas performed at feasts and potlatches, or at winter ceremonies held by secret societies.Some masks embody mythology or history. Others depict shamanic experiences, or are portrait masks that represent personal experience. The most elaborate are transformation masks, which are used to display the transition from one form to another, such as Wolf to Human. At the high point of the dance, the dancer will open the outer mask to reveal another one inside.The introduction by Gary Wyatt outlines the place of art inside Northwest Coast societies and the place of Northwest Coast art in the outside art world. He also explains the importance, meaning, and ceremonial use of masks. Each mask is accompanied by the artist’s own words describing its creation and meaning. [less]

$28.95

Sun Dogs and Eagle Down: The Indian Paintings of Bill Holm

Steven C. Brown, Lloyd J. Averill

2000    208 Pages    (University of Washington Press)

DDC: 759.13    LCC: ND237.H66948

OCLC: 43317706    LCCN: 21618    ISBN 13: 9780295979472    ISBN 10: 029597947X

Bill Holm is internationally recognized as a leading expert on Northwest Coast, Plateau, and Plains Indian art. As curator emeritus of Native American art at the Burke Museum, professor emeritus of art history at the University of Washington, and author of numerous books and articles, including the classic work Northwest Coast Indian Art: An Analysis of Form, he has established an unparalleled reputation as a scholar, teacher, and craftsman. For many years he has also produced detailed paintings [...]

Bill Holm is internationally recognized as a leading expert on Northwest Coast, Plateau, and Plains Indian art. As curator emeritus of Native American art at the Burke Museum, professor emeritus of art history at the University of Washington, and author of numerous books and articles, including the classic work Northwest Coast Indian Art: An Analysis of Form, he has established an unparalleled reputation as a scholar, teacher, and craftsman. For many years he has also produced detailed paintings that draw on his ethnographic expertise to recreate the settings in which the old Native American art objects were used.This eagerly awaited book makes available for the first time 49 full-color reproductions of Bill Holm’s paintings of traditional Indian scenes, produced from the 1950s to the present. Also included are some of the small watercolors and drawings Holm has made on envelopes, and several of his three-dimensional pieces, some of which were created in part as props for the paintings. In addition to being visually compelling, the pictures provide a wealth of ethnographic detail, from the eagle down scattered by the Kwakiutl to welcome important guests, to the sun dogs -- bright spots near the horizon that mimic the sun -- featured in myths from many northern tribes. A lengthy descriptive caption by the artist accompanies each painting.Steven Brown’s essay offers a rich balance of scholarly information, sensitive critical analysis of individual works, and warmly personal anecdotes. He positions Holm’s scholarship in terms of his development as a fine artist, interweaving Holm’s curatorial activities and art historical writings with his corpus of paintings.Lloyd Averill’s concise, extensively researched chronology is packed with useful and interesting information. He provides in addition a complete bibliography of works by and about Bill Holm. His chronology includes Holm’s long relationship with the Kwakwaka’wakw and with coastal Natives, his association with Bill Reid and the "Northwest Coast renaissance," and his involvement with the restoration and reissuing of the 1914 Edward Curtis movie, now titled In the Land of the War Canoes. [less]

$40.00
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Totem Pole: An Intercultural History, The

Aldona Jonaitis, Aaron Glass

2010    344 Pages    (University of Washington Press)

DDC: 979.500497    LCC: E98.T65

OCLC: 489003003    LCCN: 2009053809    ISBN 13: 9780295989624    ISBN 10: 97802959896

The Northwest Coast totem pole captivates the imagination. From the first descriptions of these tall carved monuments, totem poles have become central icons of the Northwest Coast region and symbols of its Native inhabitants. Although many of those who gaze at these carvings assume that they are ancient artifacts, the so-called totem pole is a relatively recent artistic development, one that has become immensely important to Northwest Coast people and has simultaneously gained a common place in [...]

The Northwest Coast totem pole captivates the imagination. From the first descriptions of these tall carved monuments, totem poles have become central icons of the Northwest Coast region and symbols of its Native inhabitants. Although many of those who gaze at these carvings assume that they are ancient artifacts, the so-called totem pole is a relatively recent artistic development, one that has become immensely important to Northwest Coast people and has simultaneously gained a common place in popular culture from fashion to the funny pages. The Totem Pole reconstructs the intercultural history of the art form in its myriad manifestations from the eighteenth century to the present. Aldona Jonaitis and Aaron Glass analyze the totem pole’s continual transformation since Europeans first arrived on the scene, investigate its various functions in different contexts, and address the significant influence of colonialism on the proliferation and distribution of carved poles. The authors also describe their theories on the development of the art form: its spread from the Northwest Coast to world’s fairs and global theme parks; its integration with the history of tourism and its transformation into a signifier of place; the role of governments, museums, and anthropologists in collecting and restoring poles; and the part that these carvings have continuously played in Native struggles for control of their cultures and their lands.Short essays by scholars and artists, including Robert Davidson, Bill Holm, Richard Hunt, Nathan Jackson, Vickie Jensen, Andrea Laforet, Susan Point, Charlotte Townsend-Gault, Lyle Wilson, and Robin Wright, provide specific case studies of many of the topics discussed, directly illustrating the various relationships that people have with the totem pole.Errata: www.washington.edu/uwpress/... [less]

$50.00
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Understanding Northwest Coast Art: A Guide to Crests, Beings and Symbols

Cheryl Shearar

2000    192 Pages    (University of Washington Press)

DDC: 704.03970795    LCC: E78.N78

OCLC: 43607269    LCCN: 00023450    ISBN 13: 9780295979731    ISBN 10: 0295979739

Understanding Northwest Coast Art is a handy, dictionary-style reference guide to identifying and understanding the symbols, crests, and beings depicted in Northwest Coast Native American works of art such as totem poles, masks, and prints.The first section of the book features an alphabetical list of words relating to Northwest Coast art, with definitions, descriptions, and explanations and synopses of the major myths associated with them. As an aid to identification and understanding, many of [...]

Understanding Northwest Coast Art is a handy, dictionary-style reference guide to identifying and understanding the symbols, crests, and beings depicted in Northwest Coast Native American works of art such as totem poles, masks, and prints.The first section of the book features an alphabetical list of words relating to Northwest Coast art, with definitions, descriptions, and explanations and synopses of the major myths associated with them. As an aid to identification and understanding, many of the crests, beings, and symbols are illustrated in 70 reproductions of contemporary artworks and archival photos. The entries cover a wide range: crests such as Eagle, Dogfish, or Dragonfly; ancestral beings such as Creek Woman or Thunderbird; mythic beings such as Raven, the Chief of the Undersea, or Cedar Man; and supernatural beings such as Death-Bringer. Understanding Northwest Coast Art also includes brief descriptions of the design conventions, design elements, and different art styles of Northwest Coast cultural groups, along with an overview of the interconnections between art, myth, and ceremony.Easy to use and easy to read, this volume is an essential source for understanding and visually identifying the underlying themes and subjects of Northwest Coast Native American art. [less]

$22.95
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Visions in the Mist

2008    90 Pages   

DDC: 709.0113    LCC: E78.W3 K47

OCLC: 298553353    LCCN: 2012454370    ISBN 13: 9780976480457    ISBN 10: 097648045X

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$16.00
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Way of the Masks, The

Claude Levi-Strauss

1988    276 Pages    (University of Washington Press)

DDC: 732.2    LCC: E78.N78

OCLC: 18172192    LCCN: 82002723    ISBN 13: 9780295966366    ISBN 10: 029596636X

Claude Levi-Strauss’s fascination with Northwest Coast Indian art dates back to the late 1930s. “Sometime before the outbreak of the Second World War,” he writes, “I had already bought in Paris a Haida slate panel pipe.” In New York in the early forties, he shared his enthusiasm with a group of Surrealist refugee artists with whom he was associated. “Surely it will not be long,” he wrote in an article published in 1943, “before we see the collections from this part of the world [...]

Claude Levi-Strauss’s fascination with Northwest Coast Indian art dates back to the late 1930s. “Sometime before the outbreak of the Second World War,” he writes, “I had already bought in Paris a Haida slate panel pipe.” In New York in the early forties, he shared his enthusiasm with a group of Surrealist refugee artists with whom he was associated. “Surely it will not be long,” he wrote in an article published in 1943, “before we see the collections from this part of the world moved from ethnographic to fine arts museums to take their just place amidst the antiquities of Egypt of Persia and the works of medieval Europe. For this art is not unequal to the greatest, and, in the course of the century and a half of its history that is known to us, it has shown evidence of a superior diversity and has demonstrated apparently inexhaustible talents for renewal.”In The Way of the Masks, first published more than thirty years later, he returned to this material, seeking to unravel a persistent problem that he associated with a particular mask, the Swaihwe, which is found among certain tribes of coastal British Columbia. This book, now available for the first time in an English translation, is a vivid, audacious illustration of Levi-Strauss’s provocative structural approach to tribal art and culture.Bringing to bear on the Swaihwe masks his theory that mythical representations cannot be understood as isolated objects, Levi-Strausss began to look for links among them, as well as relationships between these and other types of masks and myths, treating them all as parts of a dialogue that has been going on for generations among neighboring tribes. The wider system that emerges form his investigation uncovers the association of the masks with Northwest coppers and with hereditary status and wealth, and takes the reader as far north as the Dene of Alaska, as far south as the Yurok of northern California, and as far away in time and space as medieval Europe. As one reader said of this book, “It will be controversial, as his work always is, and it will stimulate more scholarship on the Northwest Coast than any other single book that I can think of.” [less]

$22.95

Wealth of Thought, A

Aldona Jonaitis (Editor), Franz Boas

1994    380 Pages    (University of Washington Press)

DDC: 704    LCC: E78.N78 W43

OCLC: 263608865    LCCN: 94015180    ISBN 13: 9780295973845    ISBN 10: 0295973846

Although Franz Boas--one of the most influential anthropologists of the twentieth century--is best known for his voluminous writings on cultural, physical, and linguistic anthropology, he is also recognized for breaking new ground in the study of so-called primitive art. His writings on art have major historical value because they embody a profound change in art history. Nineteenth-century scholars assumed that all art lay on a continuum from primitive to advanced: artworks of all nonliterate [...]

Although Franz Boas--one of the most influential anthropologists of the twentieth century--is best known for his voluminous writings on cultural, physical, and linguistic anthropology, he is also recognized for breaking new ground in the study of so-called primitive art. His writings on art have major historical value because they embody a profound change in art history. Nineteenth-century scholars assumed that all art lay on a continuum from primitive to advanced: artworks of all nonliterate peoples were therefore examples of early stages of development. But Boas's case studies from his own fieldwork in the Pacific Northwest demonstrated different tenets: the variety of history, the influence of diffusion, the symbolic and stylistic variation in art styles found among groups and sometimes within one group, and the role of imagination and creativity on the part of the artist. This volume presents Boas's most significant writings on art (dated 1889-1916), many originally published in obscure sources now difficult to locate. The original illustrations and an extensive, combined bibliography are included. Aldona Jonaitis's careful compilation of articles and the thorough historical and theoretical framework in which she casts them in her introductory and concluding essays make this volume a valuable reference for students of art history and Northwest anthropology, and a special delight for admirers of Boas. [less]

$40.00
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