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Beaten Down: A History Of Interpersonal Violence In The West

David Peterson del Mar

2011    312 Pages    (University of Washington Press)

DDC: 303.60978    LCC: HM886

OCLC: 50023694    ISBN 13: 9780295985053    ISBN 10: 0295985054

This book examines interpersonal violence in Washington, Oregon, and British Columbia beginning with Native American cultures before colonization and continuing into the mid-twentieth centuries. Rather than riots or lynchings, it is concerned with more prosaic acts of physical force-a husband slapping his wife, a parent taking a birch branch to a child, a pair of drunken friends squaring off to establish who was the "better man". Del Mar accounts for the social relations of power that [...]

This book examines interpersonal violence in Washington, Oregon, and British Columbia beginning with Native American cultures before colonization and continuing into the mid-twentieth centuries. Rather than riots or lynchings, it is concerned with more prosaic acts of physical force-a husband slapping his wife, a parent taking a birch branch to a child, a pair of drunken friends squaring off to establish who was the "better man". Del Mar accounts for the social relations of power that lie behind this intimate form of violence. [less]

$30.00

Best of Covered Wagon Women

Kenneth L. Holmes

2008    304 Pages    (University of Oklahoma Press)

DDC: 978.020922    LCC: F591

OCLC: 173367498    LCCN: 2007037677    ISBN 13: 9780806139142    ISBN 10: 0806139145

The diaries and letters of women who braved the overland trails during the great nineteenth-century westward migration are treasured documents in the study of the American West. These eight firsthand accounts are among the best ever written. They were selected for the power with which they portray the hardship, adventure, and boundless love for friends and family that characterized the overland experience. Some were written with the skilled pens of educated women. Others bear the marks of crude [...]

The diaries and letters of women who braved the overland trails during the great nineteenth-century westward migration are treasured documents in the study of the American West. These eight firsthand accounts are among the best ever written. They were selected for the power with which they portray the hardship, adventure, and boundless love for friends and family that characterized the overland experience. Some were written with the skilled pens of educated women. Others bear the marks of crude cabin learning, with archaic and imaginative spelling and a simplicity of expression. All convey the profound effect the westward trek had on these women.For too long these diaries and letters were secreted away in attics and basements or collected dust on the shelves of manuscript collections across the country. Their publication gives us a fresh perspective on the pioneer experience. [less]

$19.95

Best of Covered Wagon Women: Emigrant Girls on the Overland Trails

2010    256 Pages    (University of Oklahoma Press)

DDC: 978.020922    LCC: F591

OCLC: 173367498    LCCN: 2007037677    ISBN 13: 9780806141046    ISBN 10: 0806141042

The diaries and letters of women on the overland trails in the mid- to late nineteenth century are treasured documents. These eleven selections drawn from the multivolume Covered Wagon Women series present the best first-person trail accounts penned by women in their teens who traveled west between 1846 and 1898. Ranging in age from eleven to nineteen, unmarried and without children of their own, these diarists had experiences different from those of older women who carried heavier [...]

The diaries and letters of women on the overland trails in the mid- to late nineteenth century are treasured documents. These eleven selections drawn from the multivolume Covered Wagon Women series present the best first-person trail accounts penned by women in their teens who traveled west between 1846 and 1898. Ranging in age from eleven to nineteen, unmarried and without children of their own, these diarists had experiences different from those of older women who carried heavier responsibilities with them on the trail.These letters and diaries reflect both the unique perspective of youthful optimism and the experiences common among all female emigrants. The young women write of friendship and family, trail hardships, and explorations such as visits to Indian gravesites. Some like Sallie Hester even write of enjoying the company of men, and many speculate about marriage prospects. Domestic roles did not define the girls’ trail experience; only the four oldest in this collection recorded helping with chores. As they journey through Indian lands, these writers show that even their youth did not prevent them from holding notions of white racial superiority.Two of the selections are newly published, having appeared only in limited-distribution collector’s editions of the original series. For all readers captivated by the first Best of Covered Wagon Women collection, this new volume’s focus on youthful travelers adds a fresh perspective to life on the trail. [less]

$19.95

Bicycling the Oregon Trail

Don Weinell

2017    212 Pages    (Caxton Press)

DDC: 910.9795    LCC: GV1045.5.O74 W45

OCLC: 987437488    LCCN: 2017020172    ISBN 13: 9780870046124    ISBN 10: 0870046128

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$17.00
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Calvin Tibbets: Oregon's First Pioneer

Jerry Sutherland

2016    68 Pages    (CreateSpace Independent Publishing Platform)

DDC: 979.503    LCC: F880

OCLC: 961829769    LCCN: 2016912150    ISBN 13: 9781533068453    ISBN 10: 1533068453

When Calvin Tibbets ventured to Oregon Country in 1832 it was looking more British than American. That's because Hudson’s Bay Company, the Crown’s proxy, had virtual control of the area and some of their French Canadian employees had retired to farms along the Willamette River. The only Americans there before Tibbets were explorers, fur trappers, scientists, and sailors. His goal was different: to settle Oregon with Americans and make it part of the United States. Tibbets got along with his [...]

When Calvin Tibbets ventured to Oregon Country in 1832 it was looking more British than American. That's because Hudson’s Bay Company, the Crown’s proxy, had virtual control of the area and some of their French Canadian employees had retired to farms along the Willamette River. The only Americans there before Tibbets were explorers, fur trappers, scientists, and sailors. His goal was different: to settle Oregon with Americans and make it part of the United States. Tibbets got along with his Canadian neighbors and native tribes long enough to assist fellow American settlers when they arrived: first missionaries, then retiring mountain men, and finally wagon train pioneers who crossed the Oregon Trail in such great numbers that the British finally gave up their claims to Oregon in 1846. Unfortunately, Tibbets died soon after achieving his goal, and all that he had done to achieve it soon faded into the shadows of Oregon history. In making the case for Calvin Tibbets being considered Oregon’s first pioneer, this book shines a bright light back on him. New details gleaned from original sources are integrated with previously published, but scattered, accounts of Tibbets’ many adventures. Readers will likely learn things they didn’t know about John McLoughlin, Jason Lee, Ewing Young, Bethenia Owens-Adair, Elbridge Trask, Joe Meek, Solomon and Celiast Smith, and others who played important roles in early Oregon. [less]

$9.95

Confederacy of Ambition, A

William L. Lang

2014    368 Pages    (University of Washington Press)

DDC: 979.703092    LCC: F891.M545

OCLC: 930491734    ISBN 13: 9780295993850    ISBN 10: 0295993855

The promise of opportunity drew twenty-seven-year-old Illinois schoolteacher William Winlock Miller west to the future Washington Territory in 1850. Like so many other Oregon Trail emigrants Miller arrived cash-poor and ambitious, but unlike most he fulfilled his grandest ambitions. By the time of his death in 1876, Miller had amassed one of the largest private fortunes in the territory and had used it creatively in developing the region's assets, leaving a significant mark on the territory's [...]

The promise of opportunity drew twenty-seven-year-old Illinois schoolteacher William Winlock Miller west to the future Washington Territory in 1850. Like so many other Oregon Trail emigrants Miller arrived cash-poor and ambitious, but unlike most he fulfilled his grandest ambitions. By the time of his death in 1876, Miller had amassed one of the largest private fortunes in the territory and had used it creatively in developing the region's assets, leaving a significant mark on the territory's political and economic history. Appointed Surveyor of Customs at the newly created Port of Nisqually in 1851, Miller was the first federal official north of the Columbia River. Two years later he helped organize the new territory's Democratic Party and quickly became a political and financial confidant of governor Isaac Stevens. His involvement in the Indian conflict in 1855-56, a term in the territorial legislature, and his bankrolling of key politicians made him the territory's most effective political networker. His role as a "hip-pocket banker" in a region without established banks made him a powerful financial broker and a major player in territorial affairs. But in his pursuit of success Miller compromised another ambition he carried west from Illinois. He postponed marriage and family until only a few years before his death and agonized about relationships with his family in Illinois. His experience reminds us that the pioneer settlement era was a period of social dislocation and that public economic and political success could mask personal disappointment. Lang's biography takes readers into the heart of Washington territorial politics, where alliances often hinged more on mutual economic interest than political principles and nearly all agreed that government should encourage ambitious and energetic men. In this world, Lang argues, Miller succeeded because he parlayed his talents in camaraderie politics and sharp-pencil business affairs with an unabashed mining of governmental opportunities. William Lang's account of William Winlock Miller and the first quarter century of Washington's history offers a new view of the pioneer era, emphasizing that the West was developed in large measure by men like Miller who manipulated government and its resources to their own and the region's advantage. [less]

$25.00

Conversations With Pioneer Women (Oregon country library)

Fred Lockley

1981    310 Pages    (Rainy Day Pr)

DDC: 979.5040922    LCC: F875

OCLC: 7617656    LCCN: 81050845    ISBN 13: 9780931742088    ISBN 10: 0931742080

Book by Lockley, Fred

Book by Lockley, Fred [less]

$20.00

Converting the West: A Biography of Narcissa Whitman (The Oklahoma Western Biographies)

Julie Roy Jeffrey

1994    256 Pages    (University of Oklahoma Press)

DDC: 979.702092    LCC: E99.C32

OCLC: 23355851    LCCN: 91012326    ISBN 13: 9780806126234    ISBN 10: 080612623X

Narcissa Whitman and her husband, Marcus, were pioneer missionaries to the Cayuse Indians in Oregon Territory.  Narcissa grew up in western New York State, her values and attitudes carefully shaped by her mother. Very much a child of the Second Great Awakening, she eagerly embraced the burgeoning evangelical missionary movement. Following her marriage to Marcus Whitman, she spent most of 1836 traveling overland with him to Oregon. Narcissa enthusiastically began service as a missionary [...]

Narcissa Whitman and her husband, Marcus, were pioneer missionaries to the Cayuse Indians in Oregon Territory.  Narcissa grew up in western New York State, her values and attitudes carefully shaped by her mother. Very much a child of the Second Great Awakening, she eagerly embraced the burgeoning evangelical missionary movement. Following her marriage to Marcus Whitman, she spent most of 1836 traveling overland with him to Oregon. Narcissa enthusiastically began service as a missionary there, hoping to see many “benighted” Indians adopt her message of salvation through Christ.But not one Indian ever did. Cultural barriers that Narcissa never grasped effectively kept her at arm’s length from the Cayuse. Gradually abandoning her efforts with the Indians, Narcissa developed a more satisfying ministry. She taught and counseled whites on the mission compound, much as she had done in her own church circles in New York. Meanwhile, the growing number of eastern emigrants streaming into the territory posed an increasing threat to the Indians. The Cayuse ultimately took murderous action against the Whitmans, the most visible whites, thus ending dramatically Narcissa’s eleven-year effort to be a faithful Christian missionary as well as a devoted wife and loving mother.In this moving biography, Julie Roy Jeffrey brings the controversial Narcissa Whitman to life, revealing not only white assumptions and imperatives but the perspective of the Cayuse tribe as well. Jeffrey draws on a rich assortment of primary and secondary materials, blending narration and interpretation in her account. She clearly traces the motivations and relationships, the opportunities and constraints that structured Narcissa Whitman’s life as a nineteenth-century American evangelical woman. [less]

$19.95

Covered Wagon Women 3: Diaries and Letters from the Western Trails 1851 (Covered Wagon Women Vol. 3)

1996    291 Pages    (Bison Books)

DDC: 978    LCC: F591

OCLC: 36391690    LCCN: 95021200    ISBN 13: 9780803272873    ISBN 10: 0803272871

The wagon trains to California greatly decreased in 1851 as reports of deadly cholera on the trail the year before and strikeouts in gold prospecting became known. Those who did go west—about 2,160 men and 1,440 women—tended toward Oregon's rich Willamette Valley because of a new federal land law that awarded a husband and wife a full section.Volume 3 of Covered Wagon Women contains the diaries and letters of six Oregon-bound women, as well as the journal of an English Mormon [...]

The wagon trains to California greatly decreased in 1851 as reports of deadly cholera on the trail the year before and strikeouts in gold prospecting became known. Those who did go west—about 2,160 men and 1,440 women—tended toward Oregon's rich Willamette Valley because of a new federal land law that awarded a husband and wife a full section.Volume 3 of Covered Wagon Women contains the diaries and letters of six Oregon-bound women, as well as the journal of an English Mormon woman who described her experience all the way from Liverpool to Salt Lake City. The words of these pioneer women convey their exhilaration, courage, exhaustion, and terror in traveling so far into the unknown. [less]

$18.95

Covered Wagon Women 5: Diaries and Letters from the Western Trails, 1852 : The Oregon Trail (Covered Wagon Women)

1997    320 Pages    (Bison Books)

DDC: 978    LCC: F591.C79

OCLC: 312950302    LCCN: 95021200    ISBN 13: 9780803272941    ISBN 10: 0803272944

Abigail Jane Scott was seventeen when she left Illinois with her family in the spring of 1852. Her record of the journey west is full of expressive detail: breakfasting in a snowstorm, walking behind the wagons to keep warm, tasting buffalo meat, trying to climb Independence Rock. She meets her future husband, Benjamin Duniway, at the end of the Oregon Trail and, in the years to come, finds fame as a writer and a leader of the suffrage movement in the Northwest. Her grandson, David Duniway, [...]

Abigail Jane Scott was seventeen when she left Illinois with her family in the spring of 1852. Her record of the journey west is full of expressive detail: breakfasting in a snowstorm, walking behind the wagons to keep warm, tasting buffalo meat, trying to climb Independence Rock. She meets her future husband, Benjamin Duniway, at the end of the Oregon Trail and, in the years to come, finds fame as a writer and a leader of the suffrage movement in the Northwest. Her grandson, David Duniway, edited her trail diary for Covered Wagon Women. This volume includes the equally vivid diaries of other women who rode the wagons in 1852. Polly Coon of Wisconsin recalls trading with the Indians. Martha Read, starting from Illinois, is particularly alert to the suffering of the animals, noting hundreds of dead cows and horses along the way. Cecilia Adams and Parthenia Blank, twin sisters from Illinois, jointly chronicle their once-in-a-lifetime experience. [less]

$18.95

Covered Wagon Women 6: Diaries and Letters from the Western Trails 1853-1854 (Covered Wagon Women)

1998    291 Pages    (Bison Books)

DDC: 978    LCC: F591.C79

OCLC: 732800732    LCCN: 95021200    ISBN 13: 9780803272958    ISBN 10: 0803272952

Lexile:
1630L

“We traveled this forenoon over the roughest and most desolate piece of ground that was ever made,” wrote Amelia Knight during her 1853 wagon train journey to Oregon. Some of the parties who traveled with Knight were propelled by religious motives. Hannah King, an Englishwoman and Mormon convert, was headed for Salt Lake City. Her cultured, introspective diary touches on the feelings of sensitive people bound together in a stressful undertaking. Celinda Hines and Rachel Taylor were [...]

“We traveled this forenoon over the roughest and most desolate piece of ground that was ever made,” wrote Amelia Knight during her 1853 wagon train journey to Oregon. Some of the parties who traveled with Knight were propelled by religious motives. Hannah King, an Englishwoman and Mormon convert, was headed for Salt Lake City. Her cultured, introspective diary touches on the feelings of sensitive people bound together in a stressful undertaking. Celinda Hines and Rachel Taylor were Methodists seeking their new Canaan in Oregon. Also Oregon-bound in 1853 were Sarah (Sally) Perkins, whose minimalist record cuts deep, and Eliza Butler Ground and Margaret Butler Smith, sisters who wrote revealing letters after arriving. Going to California in 1854 were Elizabeth Myrick, who wrote a no-nonsense diary, and the teenage Mary Burrell, whose wit and exuberance prevail. [less]

$18.95

Covered Wagon Women 7: Diaries and Letters from the Western Trails 1854-1860 (Covered Wagon Women)

1998    300 Pages    (Bison Books)

DDC: 109    LCC: B2936.E5

OCLC: 32013185    LCCN: 95021200    ISBN 13: 9780803272965    ISBN 10: 0803272960

Some of the women traveling west in the late 1850s were strong advocates of equal rights for their sex. On the trail, Julia Archibald Holmes and Hannah Keziah Clapp sensibly wore the “freedom costume” called bloomers. In 1858 Holmes joined the Pikes Peak gold rush and was the first woman of record to climb the famous mountain. Educator Hannah Clapp traveled to California with a revolver by her side, speaking her mind in a letter included in this volume, which is also enriched by the trail [...]

Some of the women traveling west in the late 1850s were strong advocates of equal rights for their sex. On the trail, Julia Archibald Holmes and Hannah Keziah Clapp sensibly wore the “freedom costume” called bloomers. In 1858 Holmes joined the Pikes Peak gold rush and was the first woman of record to climb the famous mountain. Educator Hannah Clapp traveled to California with a revolver by her side, speaking her mind in a letter included in this volume, which is also enriched by the trail diaries of seven other women. Among them were Sarah Sutton, who died in 1854, just before reaching Oregon’s Willamette Valley; Sarah Maria Mousley, a Mormon woman traveling to Utah in 1857; and Martha Missouri Moore, who drove thousands of sheep from Missouri to California with her husband in 1860. [less]

$18.95

Covered Wagon Women, Vol. 9: Diaries and Letters from the Western Trails, 1864-1868 (Covered Wagon Women 9)

Kenneth L. Holmes, David Duniway, Frances H. Simson

1999    258 Pages    (Bison Books)

DDC: 978    LCC: F591.C79

OCLC: 57357869    LCCN: 95021200    ISBN 13: 9780803272989    ISBN 10: 0803272987

In their simplicity is their poignancy. On August 7, 1865, Mary Louisa Black noted in her journal that they were “nooning on a nice stream in a valey in the mountains.” A day later she observed that one of the men in the overland expedition had “buried an infant here yesterday—still born.” One can only imagine her emotional turmoil—she had buried her own daughter three months earlier, just as she and her husband set out for Oregon. While each diarist and letter-writer had her [...]

In their simplicity is their poignancy. On August 7, 1865, Mary Louisa Black noted in her journal that they were “nooning on a nice stream in a valey in the mountains.” A day later she observed that one of the men in the overland expedition had “buried an infant here yesterday—still born.” One can only imagine her emotional turmoil—she had buried her own daughter three months earlier, just as she and her husband set out for Oregon. While each diarist and letter-writer had her personal joys and sorrows, collectively these invaluable accounts demonstrate the passion and courage of these nineteenth-century pioneering women who led and followed their families into the West, pursuing dreams of better economic or social situations. One can only marvel at their ability to persevere under conditions that sent many scurrying back home to the East. [less]

$16.95

Covered Wagon Women, Volume 1: Diaries and Letters from the Western Trails, 1840-1849

1995    280 Pages    (Bison Books)

DDC: 978    LCC: F591.C79

OCLC: 263551937    LCCN: 95021200    ISBN 13: 9780803272774    ISBN 10: 0803272774

The women who traveled west in covered wagons during the 1840s speak through these letters and diaries. Here are the voices of Tamsen Donner and young Virginia Reed, members of the ill-fated Donner party; Patty Sessions, the Mormon midwife who delivered five babies on the trail between Omaha and Salt Lake City; Rachel Fisher, who buried both her husband and her little girl before reaching Oregon. Still others make themselves heard, starting out from different places and recording details along [...]

The women who traveled west in covered wagons during the 1840s speak through these letters and diaries. Here are the voices of Tamsen Donner and young Virginia Reed, members of the ill-fated Donner party; Patty Sessions, the Mormon midwife who delivered five babies on the trail between Omaha and Salt Lake City; Rachel Fisher, who buried both her husband and her little girl before reaching Oregon. Still others make themselves heard, starting out from different places and recording details along the way, from the mundane to the soul-shattering and spirit-lifting. [less]

$17.95

Covered Wagon Women, Volume 2: Diaries and Letters from the Western Trails, 1850 (Coverd Wagon Women)

1996    296 Pages    (Bison Books)

DDC: 978    LCC: F591

OCLC: 499132221    LCCN: 95021200    ISBN 13: 9780803272743    ISBN 10: 080327274X

The women who traveled west in covered wagons during the 1840s speak through these letters and diaries. Here are the voices of Tamsen Donner and young Virginia Reed, members of the ill-fated Donner party; Patty Sessions, the Mormon midwife who delivered five babies on the trail between Omaha and Salt Lake City; Rachel Fisher, who buried both her husband and her little girl before reaching Oregon. Still others make themselves heard, starting out from different places and recording details along [...]

The women who traveled west in covered wagons during the 1840s speak through these letters and diaries. Here are the voices of Tamsen Donner and young Virginia Reed, members of the ill-fated Donner party; Patty Sessions, the Mormon midwife who delivered five babies on the trail between Omaha and Salt Lake City; Rachel Fisher, who buried both her husband and her little girl before reaching Oregon. Still others make themselves heard, starting out from different places and recording details along the way, from the mundane to the soul-shattering and spirit-lifting. [less]

$17.95

Covered Wagon Women, Volume 8: Diaries and Letters from the Western Trails, 1862-1865 (Covered Wagon Women 8)

Maria Montoya

1999    272 Pages    (Bison Books)

DDC: 978    LCC: F591.C79

OCLC: 732800732    LCCN: 95021200    ISBN 13: 9780803272972    ISBN 10: 0803272979

The overland trails in the 1860s witnessed the creation of stage stations to facilitate overland travel. These stations, placed every twenty or thirty miles, ensured that travelers would be able to obtain grain for their livestock and food for themselves. They also sped up the process of mail delivery to remote Western outposts. Tragically, the easing of overland travel coincided with renewed conflicts with the Cheyenne and other Plains Indians. The massacre of Black Kettle’s people at Sand [...]

The overland trails in the 1860s witnessed the creation of stage stations to facilitate overland travel. These stations, placed every twenty or thirty miles, ensured that travelers would be able to obtain grain for their livestock and food for themselves. They also sped up the process of mail delivery to remote Western outposts. Tragically, the easing of overland travel coincided with renewed conflicts with the Cheyenne and other Plains Indians. The massacre of Black Kettle’s people at Sand Creek instigated two years of bloody reprisals and counterreprisals. "Amid this turmoil and change, these daring women continued to build on the example set by earlier women pioneers. As Harriet Loughary wrote upon her arrival in California, "[after] two thousands of miles in an ox team, making an average of eighteen miles a day enduring privations and dangers . . . When we think of the earliest pioneers . . . we feel an untold gratitude towards them." [less]

$18.95
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Emigrants Guide to Oregon & California

Lansford Hastings

1994    156 Pages    (Applewood Books)

DDC: 917.9    LCC: F864

OCLC: 32257392    LCCN: 32035508    ISBN 13: 9781557092458    ISBN 10: 1557092451

A popular guidebook during the western expansion and a valuable collectible today, The Emigrantsí Guide was first published in 1845. While the book introduced those heading west to the beauty and habitable nature of the Pacific coast, it had considerable shortcomings - it was the guide used by the ill-fated Donner Party. As a corrective, Randolph Marcy published a more accurate guide, The Prairie Traveler (also available from Applewood Books).

A popular guidebook during the western expansion and a valuable collectible today, The Emigrantsí Guide was first published in 1845. While the book introduced those heading west to the beauty and habitable nature of the Pacific coast, it had considerable shortcomings - it was the guide used by the ill-fated Donner Party. As a corrective, Randolph Marcy published a more accurate guide, The Prairie Traveler (also available from Applewood Books). [less]

$14.95

Ezra Meeker; Champion of the Oregon Trail: Includes : Hitting the Trail in 1992

Bert Webber, Margie Webber

1992    103 Pages    (Webb Research Group)

DDC: 978    LCC: F880

OCLC: 25633045    LCCN: 92005837    ISBN 13: 9780936738192    ISBN 10: 0936738197

In this book are 98 original, rare Meeker post cards and newer pictures of the Old Oregon Trail most of which have never before been in a book.

In this book are 98 original, rare Meeker post cards and newer pictures of the Old Oregon Trail most of which have never before been in a book. [less]

$10.95
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Farnham's Travels

Thomas Jefferson Farnham

2007    472 Pages    (Applewood Books)

DDC: 917.8042   

OCLC: 231625646    ISBN 13: 9781429002356    ISBN 10: 1429002352

Covering the Rocky Mountains and Oregon, with descriptions of the Native American tribes in the region.

Covering the Rocky Mountains and Oregon, with descriptions of the Native American tribes in the region. [less]

$24.95

Fighting for Paradise

Kurt R. Nelson

2007    308 Pages    (Westholme Publishing)

DDC: 979.5    LCC: F851.N45

OCLC: 85898250    LCCN: 2013431525    ISBN 13: 9781594160455    ISBN 10: 1594160457

Beginning with the earliest recorded accounts of wars among the American Indians, Nelson describes early European contact, including British trappers of the Hudson Bay Company, whose fur trading led to the Pig War, and the long bitter battles between whites and American Indians.

Beginning with the earliest recorded accounts of wars among the American Indians, Nelson describes early European contact, including British trappers of the Hudson Bay Company, whose fur trading led to the Pig War, and the long bitter battles between whites and American Indians. [less]

$35.00

Frémont's First Impressions: The Original Report of His Exploring Expeditions of 1842-1844

John C. Frémont

2012    392 Pages    (Bison Books)

DDC: 978    LCC: F592.F874

OCLC: 810933446    LCCN: 2012006241    ISBN 13: 9780803271357    ISBN 10: 0803271352

In 1842 John C. Frémont led a party of twenty-five men on a five-month journey from Saint Louis to the Wind River Range in the Rocky Mountains; his goal: to chart the best route to Oregon. In 1843 Frémont was commissioned for another expedition, to explore the Great Salt Lake, Washington, eastern California, Carson Pass, and the San Joaquin Valley, places that did not yet belong to the United States.His journals from these expeditions, edited in collaboration with his wife, Jessie [...]

In 1842 John C. Frémont led a party of twenty-five men on a five-month journey from Saint Louis to the Wind River Range in the Rocky Mountains; his goal: to chart the best route to Oregon. In 1843 Frémont was commissioned for another expedition, to explore the Great Salt Lake, Washington, eastern California, Carson Pass, and the San Joaquin Valley, places that did not yet belong to the United States.His journals from these expeditions, edited in collaboration with his wife, Jessie Benton Frémont, and published by Congress, thrilled the nation and firmly established Frémont’s persona as the Great Pathfinder. Part descriptive survey, part rousing adventure story, Frémont’s account was far more than a traveler’s guide. His tales of courage and wit, descriptions of beautiful landscapes, and observations about Native Americans strengthened Americans’ sense of a national identity and belief in Manifest Destiny. Still a fascinating page-turner today, Frémont’s report documents the opening of the West even as it offers a firsthand look at the making of the American myth.Anne F. Hyde provides an introduction to this signature American story that contextualizes the report, outlines Frémont’s rise and fall, and shows how, for better or worse, this explorer exemplifies the nineteenth-century American spirit.  [less]

$28.95

From the Old Northwest to the Pacific Northwest

Patterson F. Luark, Michael Fleenen Luark, Howard Jablon, Kenneth R. Elkins

1998    (OregonCalifornia Trails Association)

DDC: 978.2092    LCC: F880

OCLC: 40142903    LCCN: 98031797    ISBN 13: 9780963590183    ISBN 10: 0963590189

The overland trail diaries written by brothers Patterson and Michael Luark during their journey from Illinois and Indiana to Oregon Territory in 1853 are presented in a parallel format with extensive footnotes. The brothers' entries complement each other and portray a full and rich description of their journey. Emigrant Trails Historical Studies Series, No. 3

The overland trail diaries written by brothers Patterson and Michael Luark during their journey from Illinois and Indiana to Oregon Territory in 1853 are presented in a parallel format with extensive footnotes. The brothers' entries complement each other and portray a full and rich description of their journey. Emigrant Trails Historical Studies Series, No. 3 [less]

$14.95

Frontier Children

Linda Peavy, Ursula Smith

1999    176 Pages    (University of Oklahoma Press)

DDC: 978    LCC: F596.P398

OCLC: 40830211    LCCN: 99018932    ISBN 13: 9780806131610    ISBN 10: 0806131616

Enriched by over 200 vintage photographs, Frontier Children is a visual and verbal montage of childhood in the nineteenth-century West. From a wide range of primary and secondary sources, Linda Peavy and Ursula Smith, well known for their books on western women, have brought together stories and images that erase the stereotypes and bring to life the infinite variety of the experience of growing up in the American West.

Enriched by over 200 vintage photographs, Frontier Children is a visual and verbal montage of childhood in the nineteenth-century West. From a wide range of primary and secondary sources, Linda Peavy and Ursula Smith, well known for their books on western women, have brought together stories and images that erase the stereotypes and bring to life the infinite variety of the experience of growing up in the American West. [less]

$24.95

Frontier Living: An Illustrated Guide to Pioneer Life in America

Edwin Tunis

2000    168 Pages    (Lyons Press)

DDC: 973    LCC: E161

OCLC: 45071378    LCCN: 710694    ISBN 13: 9781585741373    ISBN 10: 158574137X

With more than 200 illustrations by the author.

With more than 200 illustrations by the author. [less]

$26.95
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Graves and Sites on the Oregon and California Trails

Randy Brown (Compiled by), Reg Duffin (Compiled by)

1998    145 Pages    (OregonCalifornia Trails Association)

DDC: 917.950443    LCC: F597.G74

OCLC: 39914246    LCCN: 98031429    ISBN 13: 9780963590190    ISBN 10: 0963590197

This popular guide describes the markers installed by the Oregon-California Trails Association's Graves and Sites Committee, providing a comprehensive compilation and description of the trail's fading remnants. For each sign, the book contains directions, the exact text, general background, and access ownership, arranged in sequence from east to west.

This popular guide describes the markers installed by the Oregon-California Trails Association's Graves and Sites Committee, providing a comprehensive compilation and description of the trail's fading remnants. For each sign, the book contains directions, the exact text, general background, and access ownership, arranged in sequence from east to west. [less]

$17.95
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Historic Inscriptions On Western Emigrant Trails

Randy Brown

2004    (Oregon California Trails Assn)

DDC: 978    LCC: F596.B875

OCLC: 56920435    LCCN: 2004061734    ISBN 13: 9781893061019    ISBN 10: 1893061019

Historic Inscriptions On Western Emigrant Trails Randy Brown - 2004 ISBN-1893061019= Paperback

Historic Inscriptions On Western Emigrant Trails Randy Brown - 2004 ISBN-1893061019= Paperback [less]

$29.95
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It Happened on the Oregon Trail (It Happened In Series)

Tricia Martineau Wagner

2014    224 Pages    (Globe Pequot Press)

DDC: 978.02    LCC: F597

OCLC: 881474964    LCCN: 2017304805    ISBN 13: 9780762772209    ISBN 10: 0762772204

 Many of the events that took place along the Oregon Trail are well known--the perils the Applegate family faced as they rafted down the raging Columbia River, the plight of the Donner Party as they found themselves snowbound and starving at Truckee Lake. But do you know the whole story?It Happened on the Oregon Trail reveals the stories of these well-known events as well as many lesser-known happenings, providing insights about the adventurous emigrants who, beginning in the 1840s, headed [...]

 Many of the events that took place along the Oregon Trail are well known--the perils the Applegate family faced as they rafted down the raging Columbia River, the plight of the Donner Party as they found themselves snowbound and starving at Truckee Lake. But do you know the whole story?It Happened on the Oregon Trail reveals the stories of these well-known events as well as many lesser-known happenings, providing insights about the adventurous emigrants who, beginning in the 1840s, headed west in covered wagons in search of a better life. The hardships and the joys of the 2000-mile journey across plains, mountains, and deserts come alive in this entertaining and informative book.  [less]

$16.95
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Levi Scott

Vira Cordano

1982    272 Pages    (Binford & Mort Publishing)

DDC: 979.5    LCC: F880.S36 C67

OCLC: 9154357    LCCN: 81070857    ISBN 13: 9780832304002    ISBN 10: 083230400X

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$7.50

Look of the Elephant: The Westering Experience in the Words of Those Who Lived It, 1841-1861, The

Andrew Hammond, Joanne Hammond

2009    (Oregon-California Trails Association)

DDC: 978.02    LCC: F593

OCLC: 355149455    ISBN 13: 9781893061040    ISBN 10: 1893061043

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$18.95
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Manhunt

Bill Gulick

1999    228 Pages    (Caxton Press)

DDC: 364.1523097973    LCC: HV6248.T7

OCLC: 40645283    LCCN: 99010642    ISBN 13: 9780870043925    ISBN 10: 0870043927

When Harry Tracy and his fellow convict David Merrill shot their way out of the Oregon State Penitentiary in Salem on June 9, 1902, they initiated a manhunt unique in history that presaged the coming media age. A gripping, exciting, and frightening story of a desperate killer and men determined to bring him down. Salem Statesman Journal

When Harry Tracy and his fellow convict David Merrill shot their way out of the Oregon State Penitentiary in Salem on June 9, 1902, they initiated a manhunt unique in history that presaged the coming media age. A gripping, exciting, and frightening story of a desperate killer and men determined to bring him down. Salem Statesman Journal [less]

$18.95

Manifest Destinies: America's Westward Expansion and the Road to theCivil War

Steven E. Woodworth

2011    448 Pages    (Vintage)

DDC: 970.04    LCC: E179.5

OCLC: 701810362    ISBN 13: 9780307277701    ISBN 10: 0307277704

A sweeping history of the 1840s, Manifest Destinies captures the enormous sense of possibility that inspired America’s growth and shows how the acquisition of western territories forced the nation to come to grips with the deep fault line that would bring war in the near future.Steven E. Woodworth gives us a portrait of America at its most vibrant and expansive. It was a decade in which the nation significantly enlarged its boundaries, taking Texas, New Mexico, California, and the Pacific [...]

A sweeping history of the 1840s, Manifest Destinies captures the enormous sense of possibility that inspired America’s growth and shows how the acquisition of western territories forced the nation to come to grips with the deep fault line that would bring war in the near future.Steven E. Woodworth gives us a portrait of America at its most vibrant and expansive. It was a decade in which the nation significantly enlarged its boundaries, taking Texas, New Mexico, California, and the Pacific Northwest; William Henry Harrison ran the first modern populist campaign, focusing on entertaining voters rather than on discussing issues; prospectors headed west to search for gold; Joseph Smith founded a new religion; railroads and telegraph lines connected the country’s disparate populations as never before. When the 1840s dawned, Americans were feeling optimistic about the future: the population was growing, economic conditions were improving, and peace had reigned for nearly thirty years. A hopeful nation looked to the West, where vast areas of unsettled land seemed to promise prosperity to anyone resourceful enough to take advantage. And yet political tensions roiled below the surface; as the country took on new lands, slavery emerged as an irreconcilable source of disagreement between North and South, and secession reared its head for the first time.Rich in detail and full of dramatic events and fascinating characters, Manifest Destinies is an absorbing and highly entertaining account of a crucial decade that forged a young nation’s character and destiny. [less]

$18.00

Meek Cutoff: Tracing the Oregon Trail's Lost Wagon Train of 1845, The

Brooks Ragen

2013    176 Pages    (University of Washington Press)

DDC: 979.503    LCC: F880

OCLC: 830682344    LCCN: 2013008273    ISBN 13: 9780295993096    ISBN 10: 029599309X

In 1845, an estimated 2,500 emigrants left Independence and St. Joseph, Missouri, for the Willamette Valley in what was soon to become the Oregon Territory. It was general knowledge that the route of the Oregon Trail through the Blue Mountains and down the Columbia River to The Dalles was grueling and dangerous. About 1,200 men, women, and children in over two hundred wagons accepted fur trapper and guide Stephen Meek's offer to lead them on a shortcut across the trackless high desert of eastern [...]

In 1845, an estimated 2,500 emigrants left Independence and St. Joseph, Missouri, for the Willamette Valley in what was soon to become the Oregon Territory. It was general knowledge that the route of the Oregon Trail through the Blue Mountains and down the Columbia River to The Dalles was grueling and dangerous. About 1,200 men, women, and children in over two hundred wagons accepted fur trapper and guide Stephen Meek's offer to lead them on a shortcut across the trackless high desert of eastern Oregon.Those who followed Meek experienced a terrible ordeal when his memory of the terrain apparently failed. Lost for weeks with little or no water and a shortage of food, the Overlanders encountered deep dust, alkali lakes, and steep, rocky terrain. Many became ill and some died in the forty days it took to travel from the Snake River in present-day Idaho to the Deschutes River near Bend, Oregon. Stories persist that children in the group found gold nuggets in a small, dry creek bed along the way.From 2006 to 2011, Brooks Ragan and a team of specialists in history, geology, global positioning, metal detecting, and aerial photography spent weeks every spring and summer tracing the Meek Cutoff. They located wagon ruts, gravesites, and other physical evidence from the most difficult part of the trail, from Vale, Oregon, to the upper reaches of the Crooked River and to a location near Redmond where a section of the train reached the Deschutes.The Meek Cutoff moves readers back and forth in time, using surviving journals from members of the 1845 party, detailed day-to-day maps, aerial photographs, and descriptions of the modern-day exploration to document an extraordinary story of the Oregon Trail. [less]

$39.95

Mountains We Have Crossed: Diaries and Letters of the Oregon Mission, 1838, The

1999    332 Pages    (University of Nebraska Press)

DDC: 978    LCC: F597.M78

OCLC: 45727707    LCCN: 99023583    ISBN 13: 9780803266216    ISBN 10: 0803266219

Lexile:
1120L

Four newlywed couples, along with one single man, were sent to Oregon in 1838 to reinforce the two-year-old mission established by Marcus Whitman and Henry Spalding. These reinforcements were to become legendary in the history of the Pacific Northwest for the incessant bickering and petty jealousies that eventually caused the deaths of Marcus and Narcissa Whitman and forced the abandonment of the mission effort. Uncertainty and conflict as well as willpower and endurance mark the story of the [...]

Four newlywed couples, along with one single man, were sent to Oregon in 1838 to reinforce the two-year-old mission established by Marcus Whitman and Henry Spalding. These reinforcements were to become legendary in the history of the Pacific Northwest for the incessant bickering and petty jealousies that eventually caused the deaths of Marcus and Narcissa Whitman and forced the abandonment of the mission effort. Uncertainty and conflict as well as willpower and endurance mark the story of the Oregon Mission and its charismatic, though contentious, missionaries. Simply getting to Oregon in the 1830s was a feat. Once they arrived, their efforts were doomed by their inability to agree on strategies for converting the Nez Percé and Spokane Indians. This Bison Books edition contains the very personal diary of Sarah Smith, “the weeping one” as the Indians remembered her. When read in chronological sequence with the nearly one hundred letters written by her husband, Asa, a compelling picture of their journey to Oregon and subsequent life at the mission emerges. Other letters, documents, and biographical sketches enhance the volume. [less]

$20.00
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Nimrod: Courts, Claims, and Killing on the Oregon Frontier

Ronald B. Lansing

2005    305 Pages    (Washington State University Press)

DDC: 979.53    LCC: F882.W6

OCLC: 57475933    LCCN: 2005001335    ISBN 13: 9780874222807    ISBN 10: 087422280X

At the remarkable age of 65, Nimrod O’Kelly—loner and former blacksmith—made the arduous trek over the Oregon Trail in 1845 to the lush Willamette valley and became one of the first to stake a claim. Although he made few improvements to the land, O’Kelly alleged his wife was living in Missouri, entitling him under the Donation Land Act to one square mile of fertile ground—320 acres for her and 320 acres for himself. Over the next seven years settlers continued to [...]

At the remarkable age of 65, Nimrod O’Kelly—loner and former blacksmith—made the arduous trek over the Oregon Trail in 1845 to the lush Willamette valley and became one of the first to stake a claim. Although he made few improvements to the land, O’Kelly alleged his wife was living in Missouri, entitling him under the Donation Land Act to one square mile of fertile ground—320 acres for her and 320 acres for himself. Over the next seven years settlers continued to arrive, and neighbors grew ever more skeptical. Did Mrs. Sarah Bell O’Kelly really exist? Slowly the newcomers began to encroach on all sides of his 640 acres. Eventually tempers flared, leaving young Jeremiah Mahoney dead, a gaping shotgun wound in his chest. The killer, Nimrod O’Kelly, chose to turn himself over to the justice of the peace, claiming self-defense. The events that followed provide an intimate look at law on the frontier—a place without jails, courtrooms, or coroners—where judges arrived on horseback, where many trials were held under shady trees, and where convicted murderers often met their end on the gallows. What would be the outcome of Oregon’s first extensively reported homicide case? If the accused recluse was indeed married, would his family arrive at last, only to see their patriarch hang? With depth and insight, the author probes and analyzes the evidence, the law, the politics, and finally, the astonishing conclusion to one of Oregon’s legendary sagas. [less]

$19.95
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On to Oregon: The Diaries of Mary Walker and Myra Eells

1998    382 Pages    (University of Nebraska Press)

DDC: 979.503    LCC: F597

OCLC: 38355573    LCCN: 97050202    ISBN 13: 9780803266131    ISBN 10: 0803266138

Lexile:
880L

In 1838, two missionary couples, the Walkers and the Eellses, joined the party going west as a reinforcement to the Oregon Mission. Just married when the trip began, Mary Walker and Myra Eells rode on horseback from Missouri to Oregon, keeping diaries throughout the months on the hazardous trail. After spending a winter at the Whitman mission in present-day Washington, the Walkers and Eellses moved north to do missionary work among the Spokane Indians.Throughout On to Oregon the presence of Myra [...]

In 1838, two missionary couples, the Walkers and the Eellses, joined the party going west as a reinforcement to the Oregon Mission. Just married when the trip began, Mary Walker and Myra Eells rode on horseback from Missouri to Oregon, keeping diaries throughout the months on the hazardous trail. After spending a winter at the Whitman mission in present-day Washington, the Walkers and Eellses moved north to do missionary work among the Spokane Indians.Throughout On to Oregon the presence of Myra Fairbanks Eells is deeply felt, but it is Mary Richardson Walker who will be remembered for perhaps the richest diary we have from a woman pioneering in the West. [less]

$21.95

Oregon Trail

Rick Steber, Don Gray (Illustrator)

1993    182 Pages    (Bonanza Publishing)

DDC: 978    LCC: F880

OCLC: 866505067    ISBN 13: 9780945134299    ISBN 10: 0945134290

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$15.95
 
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