libib

Menu

Healthcare


Tag List

ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZ#ALL
A
A

Abortionist, The

Rickie Solinger

2019    296 Pages    (University of California Press)

DDC: 363.4609795    LCC: HQ767.5.U5

OCLC: 1089287653    ISBN 13: 9780520322820    ISBN 10: 0520322827

This twenty-fifth anniversary edition places abortion politics in the context of reproductive justice today and explains why abortion has been—and remains—a political flashpoint in the United States. Before Roe v. Wade, hundreds of thousands of illegal abortions occurred in the United States every year. Rickie Solinger tells the story of Ruth Barnett, an abortionist in Portland, Oregon, from 1918 to 1968, to demonstrate how the law, not back‐alley practitioners, endangered women’s lives [...]

This twenty-fifth anniversary edition places abortion politics in the context of reproductive justice today and explains why abortion has been—and remains—a political flashpoint in the United States. Before Roe v. Wade, hundreds of thousands of illegal abortions occurred in the United States every year. Rickie Solinger tells the story of Ruth Barnett, an abortionist in Portland, Oregon, from 1918 to 1968, to demonstrate how the law, not back‐alley practitioners, endangered women’s lives in the years before legalized abortion. Women from all walks of life came to Barnett, who worked in a proper office, undisturbed by legal authorities, and never lost a patient. But in the illegal era following World War II, Barnett and other practitioners were hounded by police and became targets for politicians; women seeking abortions were forced to turn to syndicates run by racketeers or to use self‐induced methods that often ended in injury or death. This new edition places abortion politics in the context of reproductive justice today. Despite the change in women’s status since Barnett’s time, key cultural and political meanings of abortion have endured. Opponents of Roe v. Wade continue their efforts to recriminalize abortion and reestablish an inexorable relationship between biology and destiny. The Abortionist is an instructive reminder that legal abortion facilitated women’s status as full members of society. Barnett’s story clarifies the relationship of legal abortion to human dignity and shows why preserving and extending Roe v. Wade ensures women’s freedom to decide for themselves what is best for their health. [less]

$27.95

Adapting in Eden

Patricia Brandt, Lillian A. Pereyra

2002    224 Pages    (Washington State University Press)

DDC: 305.620795    LCC: BX1417.P65

OCLC: 608085133    LCCN: 2002151812    ISBN 13: 9780874222531    ISBN 10: 0874222532

In the mid-nineteenth century, Catholic priests played key roles in Indian affairs, colonization, and regional development in the Oregon Country. During and since that time, Catholics in Oregon have faced sometimes unique opportunities, pressures, and challenges in their expression of faith. Adapting in Eden extensively chronicles the progress, changes, and adaptations made by Oregon's Catholic population up through the late 20th century.

In the mid-nineteenth century, Catholic priests played key roles in Indian affairs, colonization, and regional development in the Oregon Country. During and since that time, Catholics in Oregon have faced sometimes unique opportunities, pressures, and challenges in their expression of faith. Adapting in Eden extensively chronicles the progress, changes, and adaptations made by Oregon's Catholic population up through the late 20th century. [less]

$21.95
B
B

Bleed, Blister, Puke, and Purge

J. M. Younker

2018    112 Pages    (Zest Books)

DDC: 973    LCC: R151

OCLC: 994414325    ISBN 13: 9781942186502    ISBN 10: 1942186509

Riots over the medical use of cadavers, public access to institutions for the insane, and full-blown surgeries without the aid of anesthetics or painkillers. Welcome to the middle ages of American medicine. Bleed, Blister, Puke, and Purge exposes the extraordinary practices and major players of American medical history, from America's colonial era to the late 1800s. It's hard to believe that today's cutting-edge medicine originated from such crude beginnings, but this book reminds us to be [...]

Riots over the medical use of cadavers, public access to institutions for the insane, and full-blown surgeries without the aid of anesthetics or painkillers. Welcome to the middle ages of American medicine. Bleed, Blister, Puke, and Purge exposes the extraordinary practices and major players of American medical history, from America's colonial era to the late 1800s. It's hard to believe that today's cutting-edge medicine originated from such crude beginnings, but this book reminds us to be grateful for today's medical care, while also raising the question: what current medical practices will be the horrors of tomorrow? [less]

$12.99
C
C

Chinookan Peoples of the Lower Columbia

2015    464 Pages    (University of Washington Press)

DDC: 979.54    LCC: E99.C58

OCLC: 1019977053    LCCN: 2013015931    ISBN 13: 9780295995236    ISBN 10: 0295995238

Chinookan peoples have lived on the Lower Columbia River for millennia. Today they are one of the most significant Native groups in the Pacific Northwest, although the Chinook Tribe is still unrecognized by the United States government. In Chinookan Peoples of the Lower Columbia River, scholars provide a deep and wide-ranging picture of the landscape and resources of the Chinookan homeland and the history and culture of a people over time, from 10,000 years ago to the present. They draw on [...]

Chinookan peoples have lived on the Lower Columbia River for millennia. Today they are one of the most significant Native groups in the Pacific Northwest, although the Chinook Tribe is still unrecognized by the United States government. In Chinookan Peoples of the Lower Columbia River, scholars provide a deep and wide-ranging picture of the landscape and resources of the Chinookan homeland and the history and culture of a people over time, from 10,000 years ago to the present. They draw on research by archaeologists, ethnologists, scientists, and historians, inspired in part by the discovery of several Chinookan village sites, particularly Cathlapotle, a village on the Columbia River floodplain near the Portland-Vancouver metropolitan area. Their accumulated scholarship, along with contributions by members of the Chinook and related tribes, provides an introduction to Chinookan culture and research and is a foundation for future work. [less]

$30.00

Coming of the Spirit of Pestilence, The

Robert T. Boyd

2021    428 Pages    (University of Washington Press)

DDC: 614.49795    LCC: RA650.55.N67

OCLC: 1239962265    ISBN 13: 9780295749181    ISBN 10: 0295749180

In the late 1700s when European colonizers arrived on the Northwest Coast, they reported the presence of vigorous, diverse cultures?Tlingit, Haida, Kwakwaka?wakw (Kwakiutl), Nuu-chah-nulth (Nootka), Coast Salish, and Chinookan?with a population conservatively estimated at more than 180,000. Just a century later the population had plummeted to only 35,000?a devastating loss of Indigenous lives caused by the introduction of diseases brought by settlers and colonizers. The Coming of the Spirit of [...]

In the late 1700s when European colonizers arrived on the Northwest Coast, they reported the presence of vigorous, diverse cultures?Tlingit, Haida, Kwakwaka?wakw (Kwakiutl), Nuu-chah-nulth (Nootka), Coast Salish, and Chinookan?with a population conservatively estimated at more than 180,000. Just a century later the population had plummeted to only 35,000?a devastating loss of Indigenous lives caused by the introduction of diseases brought by settlers and colonizers. The Coming of the Spirit of Pestilence examines the first century of contact and the effects of introduced diseases such as smallpox, malaria, measles, and influenza on Native American population size, structure, interactions, and viability. Whereas in most parts of the Americas disease transfer and depopulation occurred early and were poorly documented, the later date of Euro-American contact in the Pacific Northwest means that records are relatively complete. Through doctors? records, ships? logs, diaries, censuses, and Native American oral traditions and testimonies, Robert Boyd reconstructs the process of disease transfer and the profound demographic and cultural impact of specific epidemics. This definitive study of introduced diseases in the Pacific Northwest illuminates the magnitude of human suffering and traces connections between these processes and cultural change. [less]

$30.00
E
E

Exploring Fort Vancouver

2011    128 Pages    (University of Washington Press)

DDC: 979.7    LCC: F899.V2

OCLC: 710903873    LCCN: 2011012415    ISBN 13: 9780295991580    ISBN 10: 0295991585

To explore the sweep of human history at Fort Vancouver is to grasp some of the essentials of the North American experience. The fort has been part of the major historical trends of the Pacific Northwest for over 150 years, from the effects of colonialism native peoples to the role of the U.S. Army. Native Americans, traders, homesteaders, and soldiers lived and worked at the fort, their lives interwoven and their stories imbedded in the objects they left behind. Exploring Fort Vancouver uses [...]

To explore the sweep of human history at Fort Vancouver is to grasp some of the essentials of the North American experience. The fort has been part of the major historical trends of the Pacific Northwest for over 150 years, from the effects of colonialism native peoples to the role of the U.S. Army. Native Americans, traders, homesteaders, and soldiers lived and worked at the fort, their lives interwoven and their stories imbedded in the objects they left behind. Exploring Fort Vancouver uses some of the most intriguing objects from the fort's extensive archaeological and archival collections to tell the history of technology, material culture, globalization, health and diet, and the National Park Service at this significant place. [less]

$24.95
M
M

Marie Equi: Radical Politics and Outlaw Passions

Michael Helquist

2015    352 Pages    (Oregon State University Press)

DDC: 610.92    LCC: R692

OCLC: 907651360    LCCN: 2015021431    ISBN 13: 9780870715952    ISBN 10: 087071595X

Marie Equi explores the fiercely independent life of an extraordinary woman. Born of Italian-Irish parents in 1872, Marie Equi endured childhood labor in a gritty Massachusetts textile mill before fleeing to an Oregon homestead with her first longtime woman companion, who described her as impulsive, earnest, and kind-hearted. These traits, along with courage, stubborn resolve, and a passion for justice, propelled Equi through an unparalleled life journey.   Equi self-studied her way into a San [...]

Marie Equi explores the fiercely independent life of an extraordinary woman. Born of Italian-Irish parents in 1872, Marie Equi endured childhood labor in a gritty Massachusetts textile mill before fleeing to an Oregon homestead with her first longtime woman companion, who described her as impulsive, earnest, and kind-hearted. These traits, along with courage, stubborn resolve, and a passion for justice, propelled Equi through an unparalleled life journey.   Equi self-studied her way into a San Francisco medical school and then obtained her license in Portland to become one of the first practicing woman physicians in the Pacific Northwest. From Pendleton, Portland, Seattle and beyond to Boston and San Francisco, she leveraged her professional status to fight for woman suffrage, labor rights, and reproductive freedom. She mounted soapboxes, fought with police, and spent a night in jail with birth control advocate Margaret Sanger. Equi marched so often with unemployed men that the media referred to them as her army. She battled for economic justice at every turn and protested the U.S. entry into World War I, leading to a conviction for sedition and a three-year sentence in San Quentin. Breaking boundaries in all facets of life, she became the first well-known lesbian in Oregon, and her same-sex affairs figured prominently in two cases taken to the Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals.Marie Equi is a finely written, rigorously researched account of a woman of consequence, who one fellow-activist considered "the most interesting woman that ever lived in this state, certainly the most fascinating, colorful, and flamboyant." This much anticipated biography will engage anyone interested in Pacific Northwest history, women's studies, the history of lesbian and gay rights, and the personal demands of political activism. It is the inspiring story of a singular woman who was not afraid to take risks, who refused to compromise her principles in the face of enormous opposition and adversity, and who paid a steep personal price for living by her convictions. [less]

$24.95
O
O

Or Perish in the Attempt: The Hardship and Medicine of the Lewis and Clark Expedition

David J. Peck

2011    360 Pages    (Bison Books)

DDC: 917.8042    LCC: F592.7

OCLC: 679936478    LCCN: 2011001177    ISBN 13: 9780803235113    ISBN 10: 0803235119

David J. Peck’s Or Perish in the Attempt ingeniously combines the remarkable adventures of Lewis and Clark with an examination of the health problems their expedition faced. Formidable problems indeed, but the author patiently, expertly—and humorously—guides us through the medical travails of the famous journey, juxtaposing treatment then against remedy now. The result is a fascinating book that sheds new light not only on Lewis and Clark and the men and one remarkable woman (and her [...]

David J. Peck’s Or Perish in the Attempt ingeniously combines the remarkable adventures of Lewis and Clark with an examination of the health problems their expedition faced. Formidable problems indeed, but the author patiently, expertly—and humorously—guides us through the medical travails of the famous journey, juxtaposing treatment then against remedy now. The result is a fascinating book that sheds new light not only on Lewis and Clark and the men and one remarkable woman (and her infant) who accompanied them along an eight-thousand-mile wilderness path but also on the practice of medicine in their time and place. [less]

$23.95

Oregon's Doctor to the World: Esther Pohl Lovejoy and a Life in Activism

Kimberly Jensen

2012    346 Pages    (University of Washington Press)

DDC: 610.92    LCC: R692

OCLC: 816041299    LCCN: 2012026726    ISBN 13: 9780295992242    ISBN 10: 0295992247

Esther Clayson Pohl Lovejoy, whose long life stretched from 1869 to 1967, challenged convention from the time she was a young girl. Her professional life began as one of Oregon's earliest women physicians, and her commitment to public health and medical relief took her into the international arena, where she was chair of the American Women's Hospitals after World War I and the first president of the Medical Women's International Association. Most disease, suffering, and death, she [...]

Esther Clayson Pohl Lovejoy, whose long life stretched from 1869 to 1967, challenged convention from the time she was a young girl. Her professional life began as one of Oregon's earliest women physicians, and her commitment to public health and medical relief took her into the international arena, where she was chair of the American Women's Hospitals after World War I and the first president of the Medical Women's International Association. Most disease, suffering, and death, she believed, were the result of wars and social and economic inequities, and she was determined to combat those conditions through organized action. Lovejoy's early life and career in the Pacific Northwest gave her key experiences and strategies to use "constructive resistance," the ability to take effective action against unjust power. She took a political and pragmatic approach to what she called "woman's big job"-achieving a full female citizenship-and emphasized the importance of votes for women. In this engaging biography, Kimberly Jensen tells the story of this important western woman, exploring her approach to politics, health, and society and her civic, economic, and medical activism.Kimberly Jensen is professor of history and gender studies at Western Oregon University and the author of Mobilizing Minerva: American Women in the First World War."Esther Lovejoy's life intersected with some of the most important currents of the twentieth century: feminism, the rise of companionate marriage, universal suffrage, governmental reform, migration, labor rights, public health, the professionalization of medical and social work, anti-militarism, and global citizenship. Jensen illuminates the life of this fascinating, important leader and ably demonstrates the centrality of Oregon and the western U.S. to these currents." -Marjorie Feld, author of Lillian Wald: A Biography "Oregon's Doctor to the World is cutting edge in its presentation of a transnational history of women's participation in international health care, and its early chapters deepen understanding of the Northwest and national woman suffrage movement and women's partisan activism. As a whole, this book creates a picture of almost a century of women's public activism." -Melanie Gustafson, author of Women and the Republican Party, 1854-1924 [less]

$30.00
P
P

Portland Black Panthers: Empowering Albina and Remaking a City (V. Ethel Willis White Books), The

Lucas N. N. Burke, Judson L. Jeffries

2017    312 Pages    (University of Washington Press)

DDC: 322.420979549    LCC: E185.615

OCLC: 984605403    LCCN: 2015034530    ISBN 13: 9780295742717    ISBN 10: 0295742712

Portland, Oregon, though widely regarded as a liberal bastion, also has struggled historically with ethnic diversity; indeed, the 2010 census found it to be "America's whitest major city." In early recognition of such disparate realities, a group of African American activists in the 1960s formed a local branch of the Black Panther Party in the city's Albina District to rally their community and be heard by city leaders. And as Lucas Burke and Judson Jeffries reveal, the Portland branch was quite [...]

Portland, Oregon, though widely regarded as a liberal bastion, also has struggled historically with ethnic diversity; indeed, the 2010 census found it to be "America's whitest major city." In early recognition of such disparate realities, a group of African American activists in the 1960s formed a local branch of the Black Panther Party in the city's Albina District to rally their community and be heard by city leaders. And as Lucas Burke and Judson Jeffries reveal, the Portland branch was quite different from the more famous―and infamous―Oakland headquarters. Instead of parading through the streets wearing black berets and ammunition belts, Portland's Panthers were more concerned with opening a health clinic and starting free breakfast programs for neighborhood kids. Though the group had been squeezed out of local politics by the early 1980s, its legacy lives on through the various activist groups in Portland that are still fighting many of the same battles.Combining histories of the city and its African American community with interviews with former Portland Panthers and other key players, this long-overdue account adds complexity to our understanding of the protracted civil rights movement throughout the Pacific Northwest. [less]

$24.95
T
T

Transformed

William Graves

2017    (Pacific University Libraries)

DDC: 362.11    LCC: RA965.5.G73

OCLC: 979995345    LCCN: 2017302861    ISBN 13: 9780988482791    ISBN 10: 0988482797

Oregon Health & Science University seemed stuck in the backwaters of the nation's academic health centers when Dr. Peter Kohler became its president in 1988. Its hospital hemorrhaged money, served rusty water from its faucets, and sometimes forced women in its cramped maternity ward to deliver babies in hallways. Legislators proposed bills to close it. State support for the university was on the decline as was maintenance on its aging buildings. Roofs leaked, walls cracked, and researchers [...]

Oregon Health & Science University seemed stuck in the backwaters of the nation's academic health centers when Dr. Peter Kohler became its president in 1988. Its hospital hemorrhaged money, served rusty water from its faucets, and sometimes forced women in its cramped maternity ward to deliver babies in hallways. Legislators proposed bills to close it. State support for the university was on the decline as was maintenance on its aging buildings. Roofs leaked, walls cracked, and researchers struggled in dark, ill-equipped labs. So Kohler and his young administrative team came up with a radical plan to help OHSU take control of its fate as a semi-independent public corporation. And they sold the plan to the Legislature and state leaders. Free from constraints of the state and its university system, the health center's creative and entrepreneurial power exploded. Over the next two decades, OHSU more than doubled its research, clinical and classroom space; tripled its employees; quadrupled its research grants; and expanded its operating budget five-fold, reaching the top echelon of the nation's medical research universities. This remarkable story offers a case study and possible model for other public universities and academic health centers now facing the same social and economic forces that drove OHSU to transform. [less]

$24.95
U
U

Unsettled Ground

Cassandra Tate

2020    304 Pages    (Sasquatch Books)

DDC: 979.748    LCC: E99.C32

OCLC: 1127788843    ISBN 13: 9781632172501    ISBN 10: 163217250X

A nineteenth-century attack by Native Americans on a Presbyterian mission in what would become the Oregon Territory proved to be a turning point in the history of the American West. This book examines the tangled legacy of that event. In 1836, Marcus and Narcissa Whitman, devout missionaries from upstate New York, established a Presbyterian mission on Cayuse Indian land near what is now the fashionable wine capital of Walla Walla, Washington. Eleven years later, a group of Cayuses killed the [...]

A nineteenth-century attack by Native Americans on a Presbyterian mission in what would become the Oregon Territory proved to be a turning point in the history of the American West. This book examines the tangled legacy of that event. In 1836, Marcus and Narcissa Whitman, devout missionaries from upstate New York, established a Presbyterian mission on Cayuse Indian land near what is now the fashionable wine capital of Walla Walla, Washington. Eleven years later, a group of Cayuses killed the Whitmans and eleven others in what became known as the Whitman Massacre. The attack led to a war of retaliation against the Cayuse; the extension of federal control over the present-day states of Washington, Oregon, Idaho, and parts of Montana and Wyoming; and martyrdom for the Whitmans. Today, the Whitmans are more likely to be demonized as colonizers than revered as heroes. Historian and journalist Cassandra Tate takes a fresh look at the personalities, dynamics, disputes, social pressures, and shifting legacy of a pivotal event in the history of the American West. [less]

$24.95
loading
Powered by Libib