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Carleton Watkins

Tyler Green

2018    592 Pages    (University of California Press)

DDC: 770.92    LCC: TR140.W376

OCLC: 1019844897    LCCN: 2017058334    ISBN 13: 9780520287983    ISBN 10: 0520287983

 "[a] fascinating and indispensable book."--Christopher Knight, Los Angeles Times Carleton Watkins (1829-1916) is widely considered the greatest American photographer of the nineteenth century and arguably the most influential artist of his era. He is best known for his pictures of Yosemite Valley and the nearby Mariposa Grove of giant sequoias.   Watkins made his first trip to Yosemite Valley and Mariposa Grove in 1861 just as the Civil War was beginning. His photographs of Yosemite were [...]

 "[a] fascinating and indispensable book."--Christopher Knight, Los Angeles Times Carleton Watkins (1829-1916) is widely considered the greatest American photographer of the nineteenth century and arguably the most influential artist of his era. He is best known for his pictures of Yosemite Valley and the nearby Mariposa Grove of giant sequoias.   Watkins made his first trip to Yosemite Valley and Mariposa Grove in 1861 just as the Civil War was beginning. His photographs of Yosemite were exhibited in New York for the first time in 1862, as news of the Union's disastrous defeat at Fredericksburg was landing in newspapers and while the Matthew Brady Studio's horrific photographs of Antietam were on view. Watkins's work tied the West to Northern cultural traditions and played a key role in pledging the once-wavering West to Union.   Motivated by Watkins's pictures, Congress would pass legislation, later signed by Abraham Lincoln, that preserved Yosemite as the prototypical "national park," the first such act of landscape preservation in the world. Carleton Watkins: Making the West American includes the first history of the birth of the national park concept since pioneering environmental historian Hans Huth's landmark 1948 "Yosemite: The Story of an Idea."   Watkins's photographs helped shape America's idea of the West, and helped make the West a full participant in the nation. His pictures of California, Oregon, and Nevada, as well as modern-day Washington, Utah, and Arizona, not only introduced entire landscapes to America but were important to the development of American business, finance, agriculture, government policy, and science. Watkins's clients, customers, and friends were a veritable "who's who" of America's Gilded Age, and his connections with notable figures such as Collis P. Huntington, John and Jessie Benton Frémont, Eadweard Muybridge, Frederick Billings, John Muir, Albert Bierstadt, and Asa Gray reveal how the Gilded Age helped make today's America.   Drawing on recent scholarship and fresh archival discoveries, Tyler Green reveals how an artist didn't just reflect his time, but acted as an agent of influence. This telling of Watkins's story will fascinate anyone interested in American history; the West; and how art and artists impacted the development of American ideas, industry, landscape, conservation, and politics. [less]

$34.95
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Happy Canyon: A History of the World’s Most Unique Indian Pageant & Wild West Show

Rebeca Fletcher Waggoner

2016    408 Pages    (Arcadia Publishing)

DDC: 791.849079569    LCC: GV1833.W34

OCLC: 945745710    LCCN: 2016936006    ISBN 13: 9781467136778    ISBN 10: 1467136778

For over a century, the Happy Canyon show has brought together families, friends and strangers to witness a joyous celebration of local history. Originally staged in 1914 by Roy Raley, the all-volunteer show presents a live retelling of Pendleton s founding that honors both the beauty of tribal life and the spirit of the Old West. Today, the show is truly a family affair, and many performers and organizers are descendants of those early actors and crew. Author Becky Fletcher Waggoner delivers a [...]

For over a century, the Happy Canyon show has brought together families, friends and strangers to witness a joyous celebration of local history. Originally staged in 1914 by Roy Raley, the all-volunteer show presents a live retelling of Pendleton s founding that honors both the beauty of tribal life and the spirit of the Old West. Today, the show is truly a family affair, and many performers and organizers are descendants of those early actors and crew. Author Becky Fletcher Waggoner delivers a detailed, loving view of the show s history, illustrated with beautiful photography and fascinating archival photos that join past and present." [less]

$34.99
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National Geographic Greatest Photographs of the American West: Capturing 125 Years of Majesty, Spirit, and Adventure

2012    304 Pages    (National Geographic)

DDC: 779.9978    LCC: F590.2

OCLC: 802294868    LCCN: 2012275064    ISBN 13: 9781426209567    ISBN 10: 1426209568

The Wild West is perhaps the most enduring of American myths, but the reality is even more compelling. It's a magical place of extraordinary people, exciting events, and stunning scenery--big sky, wide-open spaces, epic grandeur, and pristine wilderness. National Geographic brings together award-winning photographers to capture this outsized land of majestic dimensions and emotive power. Unparalled images--some iconic, some rarely or never-before-seen--speak to the powerful forces of nature [...]

The Wild West is perhaps the most enduring of American myths, but the reality is even more compelling. It's a magical place of extraordinary people, exciting events, and stunning scenery--big sky, wide-open spaces, epic grandeur, and pristine wilderness. National Geographic brings together award-winning photographers to capture this outsized land of majestic dimensions and emotive power. Unparalled images--some iconic, some rarely or never-before-seen--speak to the powerful forces of nature and culture at work in the West and showcase the region as never before. Divided into four chapters--Legends, Encounters, Boundaries, and Visions--renowned National Geographic photography, past and present, brings the magic and the mystery of the American West alive through the best of its collection. From red-rock waves of stone to rugged snow-capped mountains, from ghost towns to prairie dog towns, from cowboys to wild horses, National Geographic Greatest Photographs of the American West captures it all in spectacular color photography augmented by periodic archival photographs. The photographs weave together a visual tapestry--complemented by informative captions--of this rich, varied, and enduring landscape that is the American West. [less]

$30.00Exhibit Catalog

National Geographic The Old West

Stephen G. Hyslop

2015    320 Pages    (National Geographic)

DDC: 978    LCC: F591.H995

OCLC: 903284423    LCCN: 2015013129    ISBN 13: 9781426215551    ISBN 10: 142621555X

From Lewis and Clark’s epic 1803 expedition to the showmanship of Buffalo Bill, the story of the American West is epic in scope, full of amazing tales of tragedy and triumph. Lavishly illustrated with vivid photographs and intricate maps, The Old West is the definitive history of a time and place that forever lives in legend.   Brimming with outlaws, miners, cowboys, Indians, railroad barons, and more, the characters of the Old West come alive in these dazzling pages, capturing the [...]

From Lewis and Clark’s epic 1803 expedition to the showmanship of Buffalo Bill, the story of the American West is epic in scope, full of amazing tales of tragedy and triumph. Lavishly illustrated with vivid photographs and intricate maps, The Old West is the definitive history of a time and place that forever lives in legend.   Brimming with outlaws, miners, cowboys, Indians, railroad barons, and more, the characters of the Old West come alive in these dazzling pages, capturing the imagination and inspiring exploration. Travel with fur traders and trappers through the Pacific northwest; read accounts of brave pioneers heading west along the Oregon Trail; see 19th century technology progress as the golden spike connects the East and West coasts; and watch the rise and myth-building of the American cowboy unfold.   Exciting, dramatic, and entertaining, this unforgettable book honors the colorful history of our nation’s past. [less]

$40.00

Native River: The Columbia Remembered

William D. Layman

2002    208 Pages    (Washington State University Press)

DDC: 979.7    LCC: F853

OCLC: 50064748    LCCN: 2002008244    ISBN 13: 9780874222579    ISBN 10: 0874222575

In images and narratives Native River recreates the Mid-Columbia untamed—the river as it once was, before the building of seven major dams. Featuring a wealth of illustrations, maps, and photographs, many never before published, this finely crafted book focuses on the 350-mile reach of the middle Columbia River—from Priest Rapids in south-central Washington to the U.S.-Canadian border. Layman gives us the unique opportunity of picturing the great river, and man’s relationship [...]

In images and narratives Native River recreates the Mid-Columbia untamed—the river as it once was, before the building of seven major dams. Featuring a wealth of illustrations, maps, and photographs, many never before published, this finely crafted book focuses on the 350-mile reach of the middle Columbia River—from Priest Rapids in south-central Washington to the U.S.-Canadian border. Layman gives us the unique opportunity of picturing the great river, and man’s relationship to it, prior to the building of seven major dams that now harness the Columbia’s power and obscure its former features under reservoirs. The author affords each segment of this waterway its own unique rich visual documentation. This forms a backdrop to compelling river stories, told in a variety of perspectives and voices. Included are Native American legends and lore, the cryptic messages of ancient rock art, accounts of white explorers and immigrants, and Layman’s own insightful observations. In his research, Layman forged a special, co-operative relationship with the indigenous peoples who still call the Columbia River valley their home. The artful blending of geological, cultural, and historical story telling in Native River unifies the reader's experience of the untamed Columbia. [less]

$29.95
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Peoples of the Plateau: The Indian Photographs of Lee Moorhouse, 1898–1915 (The Western Legacies Series)

Steven L. Grafe

2006    224 Pages    (University of Oklahoma Press)

DDC: 979.701    LCC: E78.C63

OCLC: 60348865    LCCN: 2005041885    ISBN 13: 9780806137421    ISBN 10: 0806137428

The remarkable photographs in Peoples of the Plateau capture the lives of Pacific Northwest Indians at the turn of the twentieth century—and at a turning point in their own history.The Columbia River Plateau, in the interior Pacific Northwest, was populated for centuries by the Umatilla, Walla Walla, and Cayuse Indians. By the late nineteenth century, after the U.S. government had confined these peoples to a single reservation, their lives began to change irrevocably. Major Lee Moorhouse, a [...]

The remarkable photographs in Peoples of the Plateau capture the lives of Pacific Northwest Indians at the turn of the twentieth century—and at a turning point in their own history.The Columbia River Plateau, in the interior Pacific Northwest, was populated for centuries by the Umatilla, Walla Walla, and Cayuse Indians. By the late nineteenth century, after the U.S. government had confined these peoples to a single reservation, their lives began to change irrevocably. Major Lee Moorhouse, a businessman and former militia officer, served as an Indian agent during this period. Believing that the Indians he encountered were a “dying race,” Moorhouse was driven to collect their artifacts and, for posterity, take their photographs.Although he was not a professional photographer, Moorhouse produced more than 9,000 glass-plate negatives, one-third with Indians as his subjects. Although his works to some degree reflect a stereotypical view, they are an invaluable aid for tribal researchers and historians because they identify their subjects by name.This book marks the first major examination of Moorhouse and his work. Featuring eighty exquisite plates, it not only showcases Moorhouse’s extensive photographs but also tells the story of the man—about whom little is known—and of the world in which he lived and worked.  [less]

$29.95
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River of Memory

William D. Layman

2006    160 Pages    (University of Washington Press)

DDC: 979.7    LCC: F853.L665

OCLC: 61859777    LCCN: 2005028643    ISBN 13: 9780295985916    ISBN 10: 0295985917

Winner of the 2007 Washington State Book Award for General Nonfiction Finalist in the Western Writers of America 2007 Spur Award competition for the Best Western Nonfiction - Contemporary category The Columbia River of today bears little resemblance to the river Native peoples and settlers knew in the early twentieth century. Between 1933 and 1984, an unparalleled fervor of engineering transformed much of the river into a series of large reservoirs contained by fourteen hydroelectric dams. While [...]

Winner of the 2007 Washington State Book Award for General Nonfiction Finalist in the Western Writers of America 2007 Spur Award competition for the Best Western Nonfiction - Contemporary category The Columbia River of today bears little resemblance to the river Native peoples and settlers knew in the early twentieth century. Between 1933 and 1984, an unparalleled fervor of engineering transformed much of the river into a series of large reservoirs contained by fourteen hydroelectric dams. While many mourned the loss of the freeflowing river, others embraced a newly tamed waterway that could control floods, irrigate desert lands, and supply electrical power for the growing region. River of Memory honors a place and time now gone from view. It restores an unfettered Columbia through more than ninety historical photographs that capture the river as it once appeared. This extraordinary visual record is complemented with the words of early explorers, surveyors, and naturalists who wrote about specific places along the river and with new works by contemporary American and Canadian writers and poets. Organized to carry the reader from the mouth of the Columbia where it enters the ocean to its source in eastern British Columbia, the narrative follows the natural history of the river through the archetypal journey of salmon returning to the river's headwaters in Columbia Lake. Introducing each section are illustrations of salmon and other indigenous fish by artists Joseph Tomelleri and Dan McConnell. River of Memory encourages readers to linger along the river's shores and spend time reflecting on its dramatic mountain and plateau landscapes. It fosters connections between the river's natural and human histories through the words of the distinguished writers represented throughout, including Jeannette Armstrong, Gloria Bird, Peter Christensen, Tim McNulty, Kathleen Dean Moore, Eileen Delehanty Pearkes, Theodore Roethke, Kim Stafford, William Stafford, Robert Sund, David Wagoner, Elizabeth Woody, and many more. [less]

$45.00
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Shadow Catcher: How Edward S. Curtis Documented American Indian Dignity and Beauty (Captured History)

Michael Burgan

2015    64 Pages    (Compass Point Books)

DDC: 973.04    LCC: TR140.C82 B87

OCLC: 890080119    LCCN: 2014033149    ISBN 13: 9780756549985    ISBN 10: 0756549981

Lexile:
1040L

At the turn of the 20th century, photographer Edward S. Curtis devoted his life to learning all he could about American Indians and sharing it with world. He took his first photo of an American Indian in 1895, and for the next 30 years he traveled the West and north to Alaska to chronicle traditional native culture. The result was a magnificentand controversial20-volume project, The North American Indian. While some scholars and American Indians found fault with the work Curtis published, many [...]

At the turn of the 20th century, photographer Edward S. Curtis devoted his life to learning all he could about American Indians and sharing it with world. He took his first photo of an American Indian in 1895, and for the next 30 years he traveled the West and north to Alaska to chronicle traditional native culture. The result was a magnificentand controversial20-volume project, The North American Indian. While some scholars and American Indians found fault with the work Curtis published, many others greatly appreciated it. His grand endeavor was nearly forgotten when he died in 1952, but Curtis rediscovered photographs are now recognized as treasures that will live forever. [less]

$8.95

Shadow Catcher: The Life and Work of Edward S. Curtis

Laurie Lawlor

2005    132 Pages    (Bison Books)

DDC: 770.92    LCC: TR140.C82

OCLC: 60419406    LCCN: 2005012976    ISBN 13: 9780803280465    ISBN 10: 0803280467

Many Native Americans photographed by Edward S. Curtis (1868–1952) called him Shadow Catcher. But the images he captured were far more powerful than mere shadows. When the twentieth century was just getting underway, Curtis began documenting North American Indian culture in words and photographs. Today, almost one hundred years later, his work still stands as the most extensive and informative collection of its kind. His photographs are more than mere documents; they are works of art [...]

Many Native Americans photographed by Edward S. Curtis (1868–1952) called him Shadow Catcher. But the images he captured were far more powerful than mere shadows. When the twentieth century was just getting underway, Curtis began documenting North American Indian culture in words and photographs. Today, almost one hundred years later, his work still stands as the most extensive and informative collection of its kind. His photographs are more than mere documents; they are works of art revealing subtleties of human expression missing from other historical and anthropological records. Filled with Curtis’s breathtaking photographs and available for the first time in a paperback edition, Shadow Catcher traces Curtis’s life and work from his boyhood in Wisconsin, through his first photo expedition to Alaska in 1897 and the completion of The North American Indian collection in 1930, to his death in 1952. [less]

$21.95

Short Nights of the Shadow Catcher: The Epic Life and Immortal Photographs of Edward Curtis

Timothy Egan

2013    384 Pages    (Mariner Books)

DDC: 770.92    LCC: TR140.C82

OCLC: 819717525    ISBN 13: 9780544102767    ISBN 10: 0544102762

“A vivid exploration of one man's lifelong obsession with an idea . . . Egan’s spirited biography might just bring [Curtis] the recognition that eluded him in life.” — Washington Post Edward Curtis was charismatic, handsome, a passionate mountaineer, and a famous portrait photographer, the Annie Leibovitz of his time. He moved in rarefied circles, a friend to presidents, vaudeville stars, leading thinkers. But when he was thirty-two years old, in 1900, he gave it all [...]

“A vivid exploration of one man's lifelong obsession with an idea . . . Egan’s spirited biography might just bring [Curtis] the recognition that eluded him in life.” — Washington Post Edward Curtis was charismatic, handsome, a passionate mountaineer, and a famous portrait photographer, the Annie Leibovitz of his time. He moved in rarefied circles, a friend to presidents, vaudeville stars, leading thinkers. But when he was thirty-two years old, in 1900, he gave it all up to pursue his Great Idea: to capture on film the continent’s original inhabitants before the old ways disappeared. Curtis spent the next three decades documenting the stories and rituals of more than eighty North American tribes. It took tremendous perseverance — ten years alone to persuade the Hopi to allow him to observe their Snake Dance ceremony. And the undertaking changed him profoundly, from detached observer to outraged advocate. Curtis would amass more than 40,000 photographs and 10,000 audio recordings, and he is credited with making the first narrative documentary film. In the process, the charming rogue with the grade school education created the most definitive archive of the American Indian. “A darn good yarn. Egan is a muscular storyteller and his book is a rollicking page-turner with a colorfully drawn hero.” — San Francisco Chronicle "A riveting biography of an American original." – Boston Globe [less]

$15.95
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Wild Beauty: Photography of the Columbia River Gorge, 1867-1957 (Northwest Photography)

Terry Toedtemeier

2008    360 Pages    (Oregon State University Press)

DDC: 979.5    LCC: F853

OCLC: 230729777    LCCN: 2008022918    ISBN 13: 9780870714184    ISBN 10: 087071418X

The Columbia River Gorge exerts a powerful influence on the lives and imaginations of the inhabitants of the Pacific Northwest. For people who live here today, just as for those Native Americans and European settlers who preceded us, this dramatic natural landform is a source of awe. Since the 1860s it has inspired superb photographers who have framed and interpreted the way we see the Gorge, and who have in turn had their artistic vision shaped by this compelling landscape. The ninety-year [...]

The Columbia River Gorge exerts a powerful influence on the lives and imaginations of the inhabitants of the Pacific Northwest. For people who live here today, just as for those Native Americans and European settlers who preceded us, this dramatic natural landform is a source of awe. Since the 1860s it has inspired superb photographers who have framed and interpreted the way we see the Gorge, and who have in turn had their artistic vision shaped by this compelling landscape. The ninety-year period covered in Wild Beauty was a critical one in the river’s history. Over thousands of years the wild, free-flowing torrent of the Columbia River carved a passage—the Columbia River Gorge—through the Cascade Mountain Range. In the 1860s, when the first photographers arrived, the Gorge still looked much the same as it had when Lewis and Clark made their way down the river in 1805, and indeed as it had for centuries before that, when the native peoples’ culture of fishing and trade thrived along the river’s banks. In the mid-twentieth century, the character of the river was fundamentally altered by the construction of hydroelectric dams. Terry Toedtemeier and John Laursen have selected more than 130 images—most of them previously unpublished and many of them never before available for public view—by some three dozen photographers to chronicle the history of photography in the Gorge. Wild Beauty begins in 1867 with images by the legendary Carleton Watkins, creator of some of the greatest landscape photographs of the nineteenth century. Later photographers include Benjamin Gifford, Lily White, Sarah Ladd, Fred Kizer, Alfred Monner, and Ray Atkeson. The volume ends in 1957 with the completion of The Dalles Dam, which drowned Celilo Falls and with it the historic site where Indians had fished for millennia.The images in this beautifully designed volume are presented one to a spread, with captions on the facing pages. The book is organized into five chronological sections, each with a brief introduction; a map shows the locations where the photographs were made. The photographs have been meticulously restored and are exquisitely reproduced in four-color process to capture the subtle coloration and nuanced tonal values of albumen prints, gelatin silver prints, platinum prints, hand-colored photographs, and early Kodachromes.The photography of Watkins and his successors is a significant piece of the cultural heritage of the Pacific Northwest. Readers interested in the history of the Columbia River and the photography of the developing American West will be enthralled by the book’s scope and artistry. And those who love the Gorge’s stunning beauty will welcome how this volume has captured its grandeur.Wild Beauty represents, in the words of one reviewer, “a culmination of decades of research, exhibition, and total immersion in the geology, history, and photography of the Columbia River Gorge.” Oregon State University Press is proud to partner with the Northwest Photography Archive to publish this remarkable volume. [less]

$75.00
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