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Across the Great Divide

Laton McCartney

2012    320 Pages    (Free Press)

DDC: 979.503    LCC: F880

OCLC: 813010838    ISBN 13: 9781476730035    ISBN 10: 1476730032

Resurrecting a pivotal moment in American history,Across the Great Dividetells the triumphant never-before-told story of the young Scottish fur trader and explorer who discovered the way West, changing the face of the country forever. In the heroic tradition of Stephen Ambrose'sUndaunted Couragecomes the story of Robert Stuart and his trailblazing discovery of the Oregon Trail. Lewis and Clark had struggled across the high Rockies in present-day Montana and Idaho, but their route had been too [...]

Resurrecting a pivotal moment in American history,Across the Great Dividetells the triumphant never-before-told story of the young Scottish fur trader and explorer who discovered the way West, changing the face of the country forever. In the heroic tradition of Stephen Ambrose'sUndaunted Couragecomes the story of Robert Stuart and his trailblazing discovery of the Oregon Trail. Lewis and Clark had struggled across the high Rockies in present-day Montana and Idaho, but their route had been too perilous for wagon trains to follow. Then, six years after the Corps of Discovery returned from the Pacific, Stuart found the route that would make westward migration possible. Setting out in 1812 on the return trip from establishing John Jacob Astor's fur trading post at Astoria on the Oregon Coast, Stuart and six companions traveled from west to east for more than 3,000 grueling miles by canoe, horseback, and ultimately by foot, following the mountains south until they came upon the one gap in the 3,000-mile-long Rocky Mountain chain that was passable by wagon. Situated in southwest Wyoming between the southern extremes of the Wind River Range and the Antelope Hills, South Pass was a direct route with access to water leading from the Missouri River to the Rockies. Stuart and his traveling party were the first white men to traverse what would become the gateway to the Far West and the Oregon Trail. In the decades to come, an estimated 300,000 emigrants followed the corridor Stuart blazed on their way to the fertile farmlands of the Willamette Valley and the goldfields of California. Across the Great Dividebrings to life Stuart's ten-month journey and the remarkable courage, perseverance, and resourcefulness these seven men displayed in overcoming unimaginable hardships. Stuart had come to the Pacific Northwest to make his fortune in the fur trade, but during his stay in the wilderness he emerged as a pioneering western naturalist of the first rank, a perceptive student of Native American cultures, and one of America's most important, if least-known, explorers. Today Stuart's expedition has largely been forgotten, but it ranks as one of the great adventure odysseys of the nineteenth century. A direct descendant of Stuart, award-winning journalist Laton McCartney has obtained unique access to Stuart's letters and diaries from the expedition, lending depth and unparalleled insight to a story that is at once an important account of a pivotal time in American history and a gripping, page-turning adventure. [less]

$19.99

American Fur Trade of the Far West, Vol. 2, The

Hiram Martin Chittenden, William R. Swagerty

1986    441 Pages    (University of Nebraska Press)

DDC: 381.4567530978    LCC: HD9944.U45

OCLC: 13560658    LCCN: 54007095    ISBN 13: 9780803263215    ISBN 10: 080326321X

The American Fur Trade of the Far West is the premier history of its subject. Its publication in 1902 invited historians and general readers to look more closely at the intricate connec-tions of the fur trade with the development of North America. Hiram Chittenden provides a perspective or overall outline of the fur trade that, after nearly a century, remains sound. Volume 2 of this Bison Book edition follows the traps and trails of such colorful characters as Ezekial Williams, Hugh Glass, [...]

The American Fur Trade of the Far West is the premier history of its subject. Its publication in 1902 invited historians and general readers to look more closely at the intricate connec-tions of the fur trade with the development of North America. Hiram Chittenden provides a perspective or overall outline of the fur trade that, after nearly a century, remains sound. Volume 2 of this Bison Book edition follows the traps and trails of such colorful characters as Ezekial Williams, Hugh Glass, Mike Fink, and John Colter. Described here are the explorers, missionaries, government survey parties, and Indian tribes of the fur trade West, and the geography that often determined their success or failure.Nine appendixes containing miscellaneous primary materials precede a bibliography and index. A new feature is a foreword by William R. Swagerty. [less]

$24.95

Astoria and Empire

James P. Ronda

1993    400 Pages    (University of Nebraska Press)

DDC: 979.546    LCC: F880

OCLC: 831333244    LCCN: 89038464    ISBN 13: 9780803289420    ISBN 10: 0803289421

In his 1836 account Washington Irving immortalized Astoria, but it has been a footnote to the history of western expansion—a doleful reminder of John Jacob Astor's failed attempt to establish a fur-trading empire at the mouth of the Columbia from 1810 to 1813. Now James P. Ronda makes clear the importance of the Astoria venture in large and complex struggle for national sovereignty in the Northwest. Astoria and Empire is the first modern account and assessment of Astor's enterprise and the [...]

In his 1836 account Washington Irving immortalized Astoria, but it has been a footnote to the history of western expansion—a doleful reminder of John Jacob Astor's failed attempt to establish a fur-trading empire at the mouth of the Columbia from 1810 to 1813. Now James P. Ronda makes clear the importance of the Astoria venture in large and complex struggle for national sovereignty in the Northwest. Astoria and Empire is the first modern account and assessment of Astor's enterprise and the first ever to unravel the tangled skein of Astoria's international connections. "On the Columbia," Ronda writes, "lines of national rivalry, personal ambition, and cultural diversity intersected to shape a larger continental destiny." In examining the ways in which Astor's Pacific Fur Company attempted to create the first American empire west of the Rockies, Ronda offers new interpretations of Astoria's origins, of Astor's role as an imperial strategist who negotiated with the Russian American Company and fought with the archrival North West Company, and of his intricate schemes to save Astoria from ruin during the War of 1812. Astoria and Empire draws on important archival sources only recently discovered, including Duncan McDougall's journal, which allows the reconstruction of daily life at Astoria. If the book is a study of rival empires, it is also a social history of exploration and the fur trade. Richly detailed, it teems with Indians of many tribes and international cast of traders, naval officers, diplomats, and rogues. They act on a historical stage stretching from Russia and the Orient to North America and from New York, Washington, and St. Louis to Astoria, the crossroads of an empire. [less]

$28.95

Astoria: Astor and Jefferson's Lost Pacific Empire: A Tale of Ambition and Survival on the Early American Frontier

Peter Stark

2015    400 Pages    (Ecco)

DDC: 978    LCC: F884.A8 S73

LCCN: 2015410090    ISBN 13: 9780062218308    ISBN 10: 0062218301

In the tradition of The Lost City of Z and Skeleton in the Zahara, Astoria is the thrilling, true-adventure tale of the 1810 Astor Expedition, an epic, now forgotten, three-year journey to forge an American empire on the Pacific Coast. Peter Stark offers a harrowing saga in which a band of explorers battled nature, starvation, and madness to establish the first American settlement in the Pacific Northwest and opened up what would become the Oregon trail, permanently altering the nation's [...]

In the tradition of The Lost City of Z and Skeleton in the Zahara, Astoria is the thrilling, true-adventure tale of the 1810 Astor Expedition, an epic, now forgotten, three-year journey to forge an American empire on the Pacific Coast. Peter Stark offers a harrowing saga in which a band of explorers battled nature, starvation, and madness to establish the first American settlement in the Pacific Northwest and opened up what would become the Oregon trail, permanently altering the nation's landscape and its global standing.Six years after Lewis and Clark's began their journey to the Pacific Northwest, two of the Eastern establishment's leading figures, John Jacob Astor and Thomas Jefferson, turned their sights to founding a colony akin to Jamestown on the West Coast and transforming the nation into a Pacific trading power. Author and correspondent for Outside magazine Peter Stark recreates this pivotal moment in American history for the first time for modern readers, drawing on original source material to tell the amazing true story of the Astor Expedition.Unfolding over the course of three years, from 1810 to 1813, Astoria is a tale of high adventure and incredible hardship in the wilderness and at sea. Of the more than one hundred-forty members of the two advance parties that reached the West Coast—one crossing the Rockies, the other rounding Cape Horn—nearly half perished by violence. Others went mad. Within one year, the expedition successfully established Fort Astoria, a trading post on the Columbia River. Though the colony would be short-lived, it opened provincial American eyes to the potential of the Western coast and its founders helped blaze the Oregon Trail. [less]

$16.99

At the Hearth of the Crossed Races: A French-Indian Community in Nineteenth-Century Oregon, 1812-1859 (First Peoples: New Directions in Indigenous Studies)

Melinda Marie Jetté

2015    360 Pages    (Oregon State University Press)

DDC: 305.8009795    LCC: F882.W6 J47

OCLC: 898088350    LCCN: 2015009745    ISBN 13: 9780870715976    ISBN 10: 0870715976

Despite the force of Oregon’s founding mythology, the Willamette Valley was not an empty Eden awaiting settlement by hardy American pioneers. Rather, it was, as Melinda Jetté explores in At the Hearth of the Crossed Races, one of the earliest sites of extensive intercultural contact in the Pacific Northwest. Jetté’s study focuses on the “hearth” of this contact: French Prairie, so named for the French-Indian families who resettled the homeland of the Ahantchuyuk Kalapuyans. Although [...]

Despite the force of Oregon’s founding mythology, the Willamette Valley was not an empty Eden awaiting settlement by hardy American pioneers. Rather, it was, as Melinda Jetté explores in At the Hearth of the Crossed Races, one of the earliest sites of extensive intercultural contact in the Pacific Northwest. Jetté’s study focuses on the “hearth” of this contact: French Prairie, so named for the French-Indian families who resettled the homeland of the Ahantchuyuk Kalapuyans. Although these families sought a middle course in their relations with their various neighbors, their presence ultimately contributed to the Anglo-American colonization of the region. By establishing farming and husbandry operations in the valley, the French-Indian settlers enhanced the Willamette Valley’s appeal as a destination of choice for the Anglo-Americans who later emigrated to the Pacific Northwest via the Oregon Trail. Upon these emigrants’ arrival, the social space for the people of the “crossed races” diminished considerably, as the Anglo-Americans instituted a system of settler colonialism based on racial exclusion. Like their Native kin, the French-Indian families pursued various strategies to navigate the changing times and Jetté’s study of French Prairie takes on the relationships among all three: the French-Indian families, the indigenous peoples, and the Anglo-American settlers.   With At the Hearth of the Crossed Races, Jetté delivers a social history that deepens our understanding of the Oregon Country in the nineteenth century. This history of French Prairie provides a window into the multi-racial history of the Pacific Northwest and offers an alternative vision of early Oregon in the lives of the biracial French-Indian families whose community challenged notions of white supremacy, racial separation, and social exclusion. [less]

$22.95
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Children of the Fur Trade

John C. Jackson

2007    340 Pages    (Oregon State University Press)

DDC: 979.500497    LCC: E99.M47

OCLC: 904397378    LCCN: 95042976    ISBN 13: 9780870711947    ISBN 10: 0870711946

During the first half of the 19th century, a unique subculture built around hunting and mobility existed quietly in the Pacific Northwest. Descendants of European or Canadian fathers and Native American mothers, these mixed-blood settlers--called M©tis--were pivotal to the development of the Oregon Country, but have been generally neglected in its written history. Today we know them by the names they left on the land and the waters: The Dalles, Deschutes, Grand Ronde, Portneuf, Payette; and on [...]

During the first half of the 19th century, a unique subculture built around hunting and mobility existed quietly in the Pacific Northwest. Descendants of European or Canadian fathers and Native American mothers, these mixed-blood settlers--called M©tis--were pivotal to the development of the Oregon Country, but have been generally neglected in its written history. Today we know them by the names they left on the land and the waters: The Dalles, Deschutes, Grand Ronde, Portneuf, Payette; and on the peoples who lived there: Pend Oreille, Coeur d'Alene, Nez Perce. John C. Jackson's Children of the Fur Trade recovers a vital part of Northwest history and gives readers a vivid and memorable portrait of M©tis life at the western edge of North America. This informal account shows the M©tis as explorers and mapmakers, as fur trappers and traders, and as boatmen and travelers in a vanishing landscape. Because of their mixed race, they were forced into the margin between cultures in collision. Often disparaged as half-breeds, they became links between the dispossessed native peoples and the new order of pioneer settlement. Meet the independently minded Jacco Finlay, the beautiful Helene McDonald, fearsome Tom McKay and the bear-fighting Iroquois Ignace Hatchiorauquasha, whose M©tisse wife, Madame Gray, charmed lonely fur traders. Here is the rawhide knot of the mountain men who brought their Indian wives to suffer the censure of missionaries while building a community where their mixed-blood children were no longer welcome. A riveting glimpse into a unique heritage, illustrated with historic maps, drawings, and photographs, this book will interest and inform both the scholar and the general reader. [less]

$21.95
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Empires, Nations, and Families: A New History of the North American West, 1800-1860

Anne F. Hyde

2012    640 Pages    (Ecco)

DDC: 978.02    LCC: F596

OCLC: 788292750    ISBN 13: 9780062225153    ISBN 10: 0062225154

“Ingenious. A magnificent scholarly achievement. A sweeping new narrative account of [western] history. A book to ponder and plunder.”—Virginia Scharff, Western Quarterly Review“Not only well researched and presented but instantly absorbing.”—Adrienne Caughfield, Journal of American History Pulitzer Prize nominee and winner of the Bancroft Prize—historical writing’s most prestigious award—Empires, Nations, and Families is an epic work of [...]

“Ingenious. A magnificent scholarly achievement. A sweeping new narrative account of [western] history. A book to ponder and plunder.”—Virginia Scharff, Western Quarterly Review“Not only well researched and presented but instantly absorbing.”—Adrienne Caughfield, Journal of American History Pulitzer Prize nominee and winner of the Bancroft Prize—historical writing’s most prestigious award—Empires, Nations, and Families is an epic work of American History that fills in the blanks on the map of the American West between 1800 and 1860. Historian Anne F. Hyde—author of An American Vision: Far Western Landscape and National Culture and co-author (with William Deverell) of The West in the History of the Nation—tells a riveting true story of Native Americans, entrepreneurs, fur trappers and fur traders in a vibrant “wilderness” to which Daniel Boone himself was a Johnny-come-lately. [less]

$21.99

Exploits of Ben Arnold

Lewis F. Crawford, Paul L. Hedren (Foreword by)

2000    352 Pages    (University of Oklahoma Press)

ISBN 13: 9780806131412    ISBN 10: 0806131411

Ben Arnold (Connor), soldier, gold-seeker, bullwhacker, scout, hunter, cowboy, trader, miner, interpreter, and homesteader, epitomized the restless frontiersman. Through Arnold's recollections, the reader can experience life in the post-Civil War West. "The young Indians did not want to part with the Black Hills at any price, and not until the latter part of September did the treaty finally get under way. The treaty was attended by many renowned chiefs and their prominent followers. They were [...]

Ben Arnold (Connor), soldier, gold-seeker, bullwhacker, scout, hunter, cowboy, trader, miner, interpreter, and homesteader, epitomized the restless frontiersman. Through Arnold's recollections, the reader can experience life in the post-Civil War West. "The young Indians did not want to part with the Black Hills at any price, and not until the latter part of September did the treaty finally get under way. The treaty was attended by many renowned chiefs and their prominent followers. They were suspicious of the whites and it seemed evident from the first that the conference would not be able to accomplish its purpose-the bloodless acquisition of the Black Hills. Fortunately for me I had brought over the mail from Running Water and had the opportunity of hearing the treaty. I had given out beef issues to every agency represented and interested in the Black Hills. I knew the chiefs and leading men in every Sioux tribe and was able to converse with them without the necessity of an interpreter.... The situation was so tense that soldiers were sent over from Fort Robinson. Bloodshed seemed eminent. Had a gun been accidentally discharged, the life of every white man present would have been snuffed out instantly." "Arnold was a soldier in the Civil War, deserted on his second enlistment, and re-enlisted under an assumed name for service on the western Indian Frontier. On his way west, he helped to chase the guerrilla Quantrill, saw the smoke of burning Lawrence, traversed the Oregon Trail, and tarried by the way at Fort Kearney, Doby Town, Julesburg, and Fort Laramie. Stationed as a military guard on the telegraph line west of Laramie, Arnold herded horses, hunted bear, became acquainted with Joe Slade and other notorious plainsmen, and saw something of Brigham Young's Destroying Angels. Deserting again, Arnold went to the Snake River, across which he helped to ferry the ceaseless western-bound horde. Stampeding to Virginia City, he described the great Montana gold rush. He visited every trading post along the Missouri and became acquainted with all the characters of note, both white and Indian. Married to an Indian woman, he became skilled in Indian language and customs, took part as interpreter in the making of several treaties, and served as dispatch bearer in the Crook campaign." --Horace Bagley, North Dakota Historical Quarterly [less]

$19.95

Exploring the Fur Trade Routes of North America - REVISED

Barbara Huck

2012   

DDC: 971    LCC: HD9944.N72

OCLC: 903673574    ISBN 13: 9781896150697    ISBN 10: 1896150691

This beautiful driving guide takes you from the St. Lawrence in the 1530s to Oregon in 1860, and includes dozens of sites on both sides of the border. The book situates the cultural and political context of the fur trade beginning with chapters on France, England, Orkney and the Aboriginal peoples. Then choose where to explore history with sections like Montreal to Sault Ste. Marie, the Saskatchewan River Route and the Lewis and Clark Trail, which is celebrating its 200th anniversary. Expertly [...]

This beautiful driving guide takes you from the St. Lawrence in the 1530s to Oregon in 1860, and includes dozens of sites on both sides of the border. The book situates the cultural and political context of the fur trade beginning with chapters on France, England, Orkney and the Aboriginal peoples. Then choose where to explore history with sections like Montreal to Sault Ste. Marie, the Saskatchewan River Route and the Lewis and Clark Trail, which is celebrating its 200th anniversary. Expertly written with stunning photography, dozens of maps and full driving directions to over 130 sites [less]

$26.95
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Fur Hunters of the Far West (American Exploration and Travel Series), The

Alexander Ross, Kenneth A. Spaulding

2001    304 Pages    (University of Oklahoma Press)

DDC: 917.95    LCC: F880

OCLC: 49346264    ISBN 13: 9780806133928    ISBN 10: 0806133929

Alexander Ross offers a completely authentic account of the earliest attempts by men of European background to come to grips with the climate, geography, and inhabitants of the Northwest at a time when resourcefulness and daring were prime virtues.It offers, moreover, an on-the-scene interpretation of the conflict between American and British interests, their rivalry for the vast wealth in Northwest furs, the conflict between free trade and corporate enterprise in the wilderness, and the [...]

Alexander Ross offers a completely authentic account of the earliest attempts by men of European background to come to grips with the climate, geography, and inhabitants of the Northwest at a time when resourcefulness and daring were prime virtues.It offers, moreover, an on-the-scene interpretation of the conflict between American and British interests, their rivalry for the vast wealth in Northwest furs, the conflict between free trade and corporate enterprise in the wilderness, and the conflict with the North West Company itself. [less]

$24.95

Fur Trade Gamble: North West Company on the Pacific Slope, 1800 1820, The

Lloyd Keith

2016    300 Pages    (Washington State University Press)

DDC: 338.4    LCC: F851.K35

OCLC: 929864032    LCCN: 2015044936    ISBN 13: 9780874223408    ISBN 10: 0874223407

In an era of grand risk, fur moguls vied to command Northwest and China markets, gambling lives and capital on the price of beaver pelts, purchases of ships and trade goods, international commerce laws, and the effects of war.

In an era of grand risk, fur moguls vied to command Northwest and China markets, gambling lives and capital on the price of beaver pelts, purchases of ships and trade goods, international commerce laws, and the effects of war. [less]

$24.95

Fur Trade of the American West, The

David J. Wishart

1992    237 Pages    (U of Nebraska Press)

DDC: 978.02    LCC: F592

OCLC: 25713111    LCCN: 92015111    ISBN 13: 9780803297326    ISBN 10: 0803297327

"In stressing the exploitation and destruction of the physical and human environment rather than the usual frontier romanticism, David Wishart has provided for students of the trans-Mississippi fur trade a valuable service."--Journal of the Early Republic. A standard reference work [that] should be required reading for all students of the American west."--Pacific Historical Review. "The whole [fur trade] system is traced out from the Green River rendezvous or the Fort Union post to the trading [...]

"In stressing the exploitation and destruction of the physical and human environment rather than the usual frontier romanticism, David Wishart has provided for students of the trans-Mississippi fur trade a valuable service."--Journal of the Early Republic. A standard reference work [that] should be required reading for all students of the American west."--Pacific Historical Review. "The whole [fur trade] system is traced out from the Green River rendezvous or the Fort Union post to the trading houses of St. Louis and the auctions in New York and Europe. Such factors as capital formation, shifting commercial institutions, the role of advanced market information, and the nature, kinds, costs, and speed of transportation are all worked into the story, as is the relationship of the whole fur trade to national and international business cycles. This is an impressive achievement for a book so brief. . . . [It] opens out onto new methodological vistas and paradigms in western history."--William H. Goetzmann, New Mexico Historical Review David J. Wishart is a professor of geography at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln. He is the winner of the John Brinckerhoff Jackson Prize for distin-guished books in American geography, sponsored by the Association of American Geographers for An Unspeakable Sadness: The Dispossession of the Nebraska Indians, also available from the University of Nebraska Press. [less]

$21.95
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Jedediah Smith and the Opening of the West (Bison Book)

Dale L. Morgan

1964    468 Pages    (Bison Books)

DDC: 978.0209    LCC: F592

OCLC: 3685826    ISBN 13: 9780803251380    ISBN 10: 0803251386

In 1822, before Jedediah Smith entered the West, it was largely an unknown land, “a wilderness,” he wrote, “of two thousand miles diameter.” During his nine years as a trapper for Ashley and Henry and later for the Rocky Mountain Fur Company, “the mild and Christian young man” blazed the trail westward through South Pass; he was the first to go from the Missouri overland to California, the first to cross the length of Utah and the width of Nevada, first to [...]

In 1822, before Jedediah Smith entered the West, it was largely an unknown land, “a wilderness,” he wrote, “of two thousand miles diameter.” During his nine years as a trapper for Ashley and Henry and later for the Rocky Mountain Fur Company, “the mild and Christian young man” blazed the trail westward through South Pass; he was the first to go from the Missouri overland to California, the first to cross the length of Utah and the width of Nevada, first to travel by land up through California and Oregon, first to cross the Sierra Nevada. Before his death on the Santa Fe Trail at the hands of the Comanches, Jed Smith and his partners had drawn the map of the west on a beaver skin. [less]

$19.95

Joe Meek, The Merry Mountain Man: A Biography

Stanley Vestal

1963    360 Pages    (Bison)

DDC: 923.973    LCC: F880

OCLC: 25722182    ISBN 13: 9780803252066    ISBN 10: 0803252064

"A tall man, with long black hair, smooth face, dark eyes (inclining to turn his head a little to one side, as much as to say, 'I can tell you about it'), a harum-scarum, don't-care sort of man, full of life and fun." That's how a contemporary described Joe Meek." Born in Virginia, Joe Meek became a trapper, Indian fighter, pioneer, peace officer, frontier politician, and lover of practical jokes and Jacksonian democracy. He was a boon companion to two other [...]

"A tall man, with long black hair, smooth face, dark eyes (inclining to turn his head a little to one side, as much as to say, 'I can tell you about it'), a harum-scarum, don't-care sort of man, full of life and fun." That's how a contemporary described Joe Meek." Born in Virginia, Joe Meek became a trapper, Indian fighter, pioneer, peace officer, frontier politician, and lover of practical jokes and Jacksonian democracy. He was a boon companion to two other larger-than-life mountain men, Kit Carson and Jim Bridger, and just as important in frontier history. In 1829, our nineteen-year-old hero joined the Rocky Mountain Fur Company of Jedediah Smith and the Sublettes and headed west on an odyssey of hair-raising high adventure and hilarious low comedy. For the next twelve years, the Rockies rang with tales of Joe's wild exploits. After the Last Rendezvous in 1840, he helped drive the first wagons to Oregon, served in the legislature of the provisional government, and went to Washington as a special envoy to President Polk. He later returned to Oregon to live out his days in the community that he helped build. Stanley Vestal (1887-1957) wrote more than twenty books, including Jim Bridger: Mountain Man, also available as a Bison Book. [less]

$19.95
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Majority of Scoundrels, A: An Informal History of the Rocky Mountain Fur Company

Don Berry

2006    432 Pages    (Oregon State University Press)

DDC: 338.3729    LCC: HD9944.U48

OCLC: 64390488    LCCN: 61010198    ISBN 13: 9780870710896    ISBN 10: 0870710893

Majority of Scoundrels, A: An Informal History of the Rocky Mountain Fur Company

Majority of Scoundrels, A: An Informal History of the Rocky Mountain Fur Company [less]

$22.95

Mountain Man: John Colter, the Lewis & Clark Expedition, and the Call of the American West (American Grit)

David Weston Marshall

2017    256 Pages    (Countryman Press)

DDC: 978    LCC: F592.7.C65 M37

OCLC: 959869557    LCCN: 2017007234    ISBN 13: 9781682680483    ISBN 10: 1682680487

The extraordinary life of Lewis & Clark’s right-hand man In 1804, John Colter set out with Meriwether Lewis and William Clark on the first U.S. expedition to traverse the North American continent. During the twenty-eight month ordeal, Colter served as a hunter and scout, and honed his survival skills on the western frontier. But when the journey was over, Colter stayed behind, spending two more years trekking alone through dangerous and unfamiliar territory. Along the way, he charted some [...]

The extraordinary life of Lewis & Clark’s right-hand man In 1804, John Colter set out with Meriwether Lewis and William Clark on the first U.S. expedition to traverse the North American continent. During the twenty-eight month ordeal, Colter served as a hunter and scout, and honed his survival skills on the western frontier. But when the journey was over, Colter stayed behind, spending two more years trekking alone through dangerous and unfamiliar territory. Along the way, he charted some of the West’s most treasured landmarks. Historian David W. Marshall crafts this captivating history from Colter’s primary sources, and has retraced Colter’s steps―seeing what he saw, hearing what he heard, and experiencing firsthand how he and his contemporaries survived in the wilderness (how they pitched a shelter, built a fire, followed a trail, and forded a stream)―adding a powerful layer of authority and detail. The American Grit series brings you true tales of endurance, survival, and ingenuity from the annals of American history. These books focus on the trials of remarkable individuals with an emphasis on rich primary source material and artwork. 50 b&w photographs [less]

$24.95
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Newer World : Kit Carson John C Fremont And The Claiming Of The American West, A

David Roberts

2001    320 Pages    (Simon & Schuster)

DDC: 978.02    LCC: F592.C33

OCLC: 46797063    ISBN 13: 9780684870212    ISBN 10: 0684870215

Between 1842 and 1854 John C. Frémont, renowned as the nineteenth century's greatest explorer, and Kit Carson, the legendary scout and Indian fighter, boldly ventured into untamed territory to fulfill America's "manifest destiny." Drawing on little-known primary sources, as well as his own travels through the lands Frémont and Carson explored, David Roberts re-creates their expeditions, second in significance only to those of Lewis and Clark. A Newer World is a [...]

Between 1842 and 1854 John C. Frémont, renowned as the nineteenth century's greatest explorer, and Kit Carson, the legendary scout and Indian fighter, boldly ventured into untamed territory to fulfill America's "manifest destiny." Drawing on little-known primary sources, as well as his own travels through the lands Frémont and Carson explored, David Roberts re-creates their expeditions, second in significance only to those of Lewis and Clark. A Newer World is a harrowing narrative of hardship and adventure and a poignant reminder of the cultural tragedy that westward expansion inflicted on the Native American. [less]

$21.95
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