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26 Songs in 30 Days

Greg Vandy, Daniel Person

2016    208 Pages    (Sasquatch Books)

DDC: 782.42162130092    LCC: ML410.G978

OCLC: 915120439    LCCN: 2015031715    ISBN 13: 9781570619700    ISBN 10: 1570619700

In 1941, Woody Guthrie wrote 26 songs in 30 days--including classics like "Roll On Columbia" and "Pastures of Plenty"--when he was hired by the Bonneville Power Administration to promote the benefits of cheap hydroelectric power, irrigation, and the Grand Coulee Dam. Timed to celebrate the 75th anniversary of this project, KEXP DJ Greg Vandy takes readers inside the unusual partnership between one of America's great folk artists and the federal government, and shows how the American folk revival [...]

In 1941, Woody Guthrie wrote 26 songs in 30 days--including classics like "Roll On Columbia" and "Pastures of Plenty"--when he was hired by the Bonneville Power Administration to promote the benefits of cheap hydroelectric power, irrigation, and the Grand Coulee Dam. Timed to celebrate the 75th anniversary of this project, KEXP DJ Greg Vandy takes readers inside the unusual partnership between one of America's great folk artists and the federal government, and shows how the American folk revival was a response to hard times. 26 Songs In 30 Days plunges deeply into the historical context of the time and the progressive politics that embraced Social Democracy during an era in which the United States had been severely suffering from The Great Depression. And though this is a musical history of a vibrant American musical icon and a specific part of the country, it couldn't be a better reminder of how timeless and expansive such topics are in today's political discourse. [less]

$24.95Recommended
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Arts and Crafts Movement in the Pacific Northwest, The

Lawrence Kreisman, Glenn Mason

2007    400 Pages    (Timber Press)

DDC: 709.79509041    LCC: NK1141

OCLC: 85484963    LCCN: 2007007302    ISBN 13: 9780881928495    ISBN 10: 0881928496

This magnificent compendium is the first comprehensive exploration of the Arts and Crafts legacy in the Pacific Northwest. It traces the movement from its nineteenth-century English beginnings to its flowering in Washington and Oregon through the 1920s and beyond, weaving into a tale of idealism and devotion everything from iconic masterpieces to recent discoveries. You will meet the architects, artists, craftspeople, and entrepreneurs in Seattle, Spokane, Portland, and smaller communities [...]

This magnificent compendium is the first comprehensive exploration of the Arts and Crafts legacy in the Pacific Northwest. It traces the movement from its nineteenth-century English beginnings to its flowering in Washington and Oregon through the 1920s and beyond, weaving into a tale of idealism and devotion everything from iconic masterpieces to recent discoveries. You will meet the architects, artists, craftspeople, and entrepreneurs in Seattle, Spokane, Portland, and smaller communities throughout the region in their own words in journal entries, letters, articles, and promotional materials of the period. Included are public and private architecture, furniture, pottery and tile, metalwork, lighting, leaded and stained glass, jewelry, textiles, basketry and the influence of Native American arts, painting and printmaking, photography, graphic arts, and book design. The ideals of the Arts and Crafts movement—a celebration of craftsmanship and the creative process; an appreciation of sound construction, pleasing proportion, grace, and simplicity; and a comfortable rusticity that sees beauty in nature and honors indigenous materials—found fertile ground in Washington and Oregon. The inspired handiwork of anonymous amateurs and significant regional artists alike yielded a remarkable variety of progressive architect-designed residences, bungalows for everyone, and all manner of artistic and practical furnishings and accessories. Beautifully illustrated with nearly 400 photographs and period graphics, including rare images published here for the first time, this groundbreaking volume is an authoritative reference, a provocative story, and an irresistible treasure trove for Arts and Crafts collectors and enthusiasts everywhere. [less]

$24.95
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Bernard Malamud: A Writer's Life

Philip Davis

2010    377 Pages    (Oxford University Press)

DDC: 813.54    LCC: PS3563.A4

OCLC: 437300054    ISBN 13: 9780199571475    ISBN 10: 0199571473

Here is the first full-length biography of Bernard Malamud, the self-made son of poor Jewish immigrants who went on to become one of the foremost novelists and short-story writers of the post-war period, a man who at the peak of his success stood alongside Saul Bellow and Philip Roth in the ranks of Jewish American writers.To tell Malamud's story, Philip Davis has drawn on exclusive interviews with family, friends, and colleagues; unfettered access to private journals and letters; and [...]

Here is the first full-length biography of Bernard Malamud, the self-made son of poor Jewish immigrants who went on to become one of the foremost novelists and short-story writers of the post-war period, a man who at the peak of his success stood alongside Saul Bellow and Philip Roth in the ranks of Jewish American writers.To tell Malamud's story, Philip Davis has drawn on exclusive interviews with family, friends, and colleagues; unfettered access to private journals and letters; and detailed analysis of Malamud's working methods through previously unresearched manuscripts. Nothing came easily to Malamud: his family was poor, his mother probably committed suicide when Malamud was 14, and his younger brother inherited her schizophrenia. Davis's meticulous biography explores the many connections between Malamud's life and work, revealing all that it meant for this man to be a writer, both in terms of how he brought his life into his writing and how his writing affected his life. It also restores Bernard Malamud's literary reputation as one of the great original voices of his generation, a writer of superb subtlety and clarity. [less]

$24.95
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Carleton Watkins

Tyler Green

2018    592 Pages    (University of California Press)

DDC: 770.92    LCC: TR140.W376

OCLC: 1019844897    LCCN: 2017058334    ISBN 13: 9780520287983    ISBN 10: 0520287983

 "[a] fascinating and indispensable book."--Christopher Knight, Los Angeles Times Carleton Watkins (1829-1916) is widely considered the greatest American photographer of the nineteenth century and arguably the most influential artist of his era. He is best known for his pictures of Yosemite Valley and the nearby Mariposa Grove of giant sequoias.   Watkins made his first trip to Yosemite Valley and Mariposa Grove in 1861 just as the Civil War was beginning. His photographs of Yosemite were [...]

 "[a] fascinating and indispensable book."--Christopher Knight, Los Angeles Times Carleton Watkins (1829-1916) is widely considered the greatest American photographer of the nineteenth century and arguably the most influential artist of his era. He is best known for his pictures of Yosemite Valley and the nearby Mariposa Grove of giant sequoias.   Watkins made his first trip to Yosemite Valley and Mariposa Grove in 1861 just as the Civil War was beginning. His photographs of Yosemite were exhibited in New York for the first time in 1862, as news of the Union's disastrous defeat at Fredericksburg was landing in newspapers and while the Matthew Brady Studio's horrific photographs of Antietam were on view. Watkins's work tied the West to Northern cultural traditions and played a key role in pledging the once-wavering West to Union.   Motivated by Watkins's pictures, Congress would pass legislation, later signed by Abraham Lincoln, that preserved Yosemite as the prototypical "national park," the first such act of landscape preservation in the world. Carleton Watkins: Making the West American includes the first history of the birth of the national park concept since pioneering environmental historian Hans Huth's landmark 1948 "Yosemite: The Story of an Idea."   Watkins's photographs helped shape America's idea of the West, and helped make the West a full participant in the nation. His pictures of California, Oregon, and Nevada, as well as modern-day Washington, Utah, and Arizona, not only introduced entire landscapes to America but were important to the development of American business, finance, agriculture, government policy, and science. Watkins's clients, customers, and friends were a veritable "who's who" of America's Gilded Age, and his connections with notable figures such as Collis P. Huntington, John and Jessie Benton Frémont, Eadweard Muybridge, Frederick Billings, John Muir, Albert Bierstadt, and Asa Gray reveal how the Gilded Age helped make today's America.   Drawing on recent scholarship and fresh archival discoveries, Tyler Green reveals how an artist didn't just reflect his time, but acted as an agent of influence. This telling of Watkins's story will fascinate anyone interested in American history; the West; and how art and artists impacted the development of American ideas, industry, landscape, conservation, and politics. [less]

$34.95Recommended

Charles Fritz, the Complete Collection: 100 Paintings Illustrating the Journals of Lewis and Clark

art by Charles Fritz, text by Timothy Peterson

2009    136 Pages    (Farcountry Press)

DDC: 759.13    LCC: F592.7

OCLC: 271812327    LCCN: 2008048865    ISBN 13: 9781560374466    ISBN 10: 1560374462

Charles Fritz: 100 Paintings Illustrating the Journals of Lewis and Clark unites exquisite Western art with one of our nation's greatest epics. The result of a decade of comprehensive research and on-location painting, this expanded collection of 100 paintings depicts the triumphs and travails of the Corps of Discovery's two-and-a-half-year trek through unknown territory to the Pacific Ocean and back between 1804 and 1806. Although several members of the Corps of Discovery kept [...]

Charles Fritz: 100 Paintings Illustrating the Journals of Lewis and Clark unites exquisite Western art with one of our nation's greatest epics. The result of a decade of comprehensive research and on-location painting, this expanded collection of 100 paintings depicts the triumphs and travails of the Corps of Discovery's two-and-a-half-year trek through unknown territory to the Pacific Ocean and back between 1804 and 1806. Although several members of the Corps of Discovery kept journals, an artist did not accompany the expedition. Unlike almost every expedition since, there had been no one to visually document the unique people, landscapes, animals, and plants never before seen by Americans living in the East. With artistry and a passion for historical accuracy, Charles Fritz, one of the nation's most respected Western artists, brings the Journals of Lewis and Clark to life, telling this remarkable American story visually and for the first time allowing us to experience what the Corps saw on their historic journey. Visit us at FarcountryPress.com for more information. WINNER: SILVER MEDAL, 2010 BENJAMIN FRANKLIN AWARDS [less]

$34.95
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Davis Country

H. L. Davis, Brian Booth, Glen A. Love

2009    320 Pages    (Oregon State University Press)

DDC: 813    LCC: PS3507.A7327 A6

OCLC: 318970579    LCCN: 2009016583    ISBN 13: 9780870715778    ISBN 10: 0870715771

Davis Country brings together a fascinating collection of the distinctive writings of H. L. (Harold Lenoir) Davis, one of the Northwest's premier writers and perhaps the most famous Oregon writer of his generation. His influence on Northwest literature is comparable to Mark Twain's on American literature. Born in southern Oregon's Umpqua Valley in 1894, Davis spent his teen years in Antelope and The Dalles working as a sheepherder, cattle puncher, typesetter, and deputy sheriff. He began writing [...]

Davis Country brings together a fascinating collection of the distinctive writings of H. L. (Harold Lenoir) Davis, one of the Northwest's premier writers and perhaps the most famous Oregon writer of his generation. His influence on Northwest literature is comparable to Mark Twain's on American literature. Born in southern Oregon's Umpqua Valley in 1894, Davis spent his teen years in Antelope and The Dalles working as a sheepherder, cattle puncher, typesetter, and deputy sheriff. He began writing poetry during World War I, but with the encouragement of H. L. Mencken, then America's foremost literary critic, he switched to prose. He won the prestigious Levinson Prize from Poetry magazine at age twentyfive and is the only Oregonian ever to receive the Pulitzer Prize for fiction, for his 1935 novel Honey in the Horn, which Mencken called the best first novel ever published in America. Davis's work displays a rich knowledge of Northwest history and folklore. His intimate familiarity with the region's landscape-his environmental sense, his feel for Northwest weather, trees, plants, animals, for the varieties of Oregon rain, for the smell of forest winds and high-desert heat-is unmatched and will enthrall a new generation of readers. To read Davis today is to discover incomparable natural settings, earthy backwoods characters, and a laconic, colloquial narrative voice. This anthology gathers a selection of Davis's finest essays and stories, his best poems, and a sampling of his opinionated letters on his life and writing craft, as well as excerpts from his most famous novels, Honey in the Horn and Winds of Morning. An introduction by editors Brian Booth and Glen Love, a brief autobiography, and an afterword by Glen Love on Davis's final, unfinished novel provide a better understanding of this truly original Northwest voice. [less]

$22.95

Down in My Heart: Peace Witness in War Time (Northwest Reprints)

Kim Stafford

2006    94 Pages    (Oregon State University Press)

DDC: 811.54    LCC: PS3537.T143

OCLC: 64636729    ISBN 13: 9780870710971    ISBN 10: 0870710974

Book by Stafford, Kim

Book by Stafford, Kim [less]

$15.95
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Elegant Arches, Soaring Spans: C.B. McCullough, Oregon's Master Bridge Builder

Robert W. Hadlow

2001    211 Pages    (Oregon State University Press)

DDC: 624.2092    LCC: TE140.M36

OCLC: 46793101    LCCN: 2001002156    ISBN 13: 9780870715341    ISBN 10: 0870715348

Conde McCullough ranks as a modern bridge builder of national and international acclaim. This definitive biography traces the professional life of a brilliant engineer whose legacy lies in the nearly six hundred bridges he designed and built in Oregon during the years between the two world wars, most notably the beautiful bridges of the Oregon Coast Highway that he called "jeweled clasps in a wonderful string of pearls."

Conde McCullough ranks as a modern bridge builder of national and international acclaim. This definitive biography traces the professional life of a brilliant engineer whose legacy lies in the nearly six hundred bridges he designed and built in Oregon during the years between the two world wars, most notably the beautiful bridges of the Oregon Coast Highway that he called "jeweled clasps in a wonderful string of pearls." [less]

$24.95

Ernest Haycox and the Western

Richard W. Etulain

2017    200 Pages    (University of Oklahoma Press)

DDC: 813    LCC: PS3515.A9327 Z645

OCLC: 1008895421    LCCN: 2016054298    ISBN 13: 9780806157306    ISBN 10: 0806157305

Western fans today may not recognize the name Ernest Haycox (1899–1950), but they know his work. John Ford turned one of his stories into the iconic film Stagecoach, and the whole Western literary genre still follows conventions that Haycox deftly mastered and reshaped. In this new book about Haycox’s literary career, Richard W. Etulain tells the engrossing story of his rise through the ranks of popular magazine and serial fiction to become one of the Western’s most successful creators. [...]

Western fans today may not recognize the name Ernest Haycox (1899–1950), but they know his work. John Ford turned one of his stories into the iconic film Stagecoach, and the whole Western literary genre still follows conventions that Haycox deftly mastered and reshaped. In this new book about Haycox’s literary career, Richard W. Etulain tells the engrossing story of his rise through the ranks of popular magazine and serial fiction to become one of the Western’s most successful creators. After graduating from the University of Oregon in 1923 with a degree in journalism, Haycox began his quest to break into New York’s pulp magazine scene, submitting dozens of stories before he began to make a living from his writing. By the end of the 1920s he had become a top writer for Western Story, Short Stories, and Adventure, among other popular weeklies and monthlies.Ernest Haycox and the Western traces Haycox’s path from rank beginner, to crack pulp writer, to regular contributor to Collier’s and the Saturday Evening Post. Etulain shows how Haycox experimented with techniques to deepen and broaden his Westerns, creating more introspective protagonists (Hamlet heroes), introducing new types of heroines (the brunette vixen, the blonde Puritan), and weaving greater historical realism into his plots. After reaching the height of success with his best-selling Custer novel, Bugles in the Afternoon (1944), Haycox moved away from the financially rewarding but artistically constricting Western formula—only to achieve his final coup with The Earthbreakers, a historical novel about the end of the Oregon Trail, published posthumously in 1952. Reconstructing the career of a popular literary giant, Ernest Haycox and the Western restores Haycox to his rightful place in the history of Western literature.   [less]

$29.95
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Here on the Edge: How a Small Group of World War II Conscientious Objectors Took Art and Peace from the Margins to the Mainstream

Steve McQuiddy

2013    336 Pages    (Oregon State University Press)

DDC: 940.531620979533    LCC: D810.C82

OCLC: 841206013    LCCN: 2013013096    ISBN 13: 9780870716256    ISBN 10: 0870716255

Here on the Edge answers the growing interest in a long-neglected element of World War II history: the role of pacifism in what is often called “The Good War.” Steve McQuiddy shares the fascinating story of one conscientious objector camp located on the rain-soaked Oregon Coast, Civilian Public Service (CPS) Camp #56. As home to the Fine Arts Group at Waldport, the camp became a center of activity where artists and writers from across the country focused their work not so much on the [...]

Here on the Edge answers the growing interest in a long-neglected element of World War II history: the role of pacifism in what is often called “The Good War.” Steve McQuiddy shares the fascinating story of one conscientious objector camp located on the rain-soaked Oregon Coast, Civilian Public Service (CPS) Camp #56. As home to the Fine Arts Group at Waldport, the camp became a center of activity where artists and writers from across the country focused their work not so much on the current war, but on what kind of society might be possible when the shooting finally stopped.They worked six days a week—planting trees, crushing rock, building roads, and fighting forest fires—in exchange for only room and board. At night, they published books under the imprint of the Untide Press. They produced plays, art, and music—all during their limited non-work hours, with little money and few resources. This influential group included poet William Everson, later known as Brother Antoninus, “the Beat Friar”; violinist Broadus Erle, founder of the New Music Quartet; fine arts printer Adrian Wilson; Kermit Sheets, co-founder of San Francisco’s Interplayers theater group; architect Kemper Nomland, Jr.; and internationally renowned sculptor Clayton James.After the war, camp members went on to participate in the San Francisco Poetry Renaissance of the 1950s, which heavily influenced the Beat Generation of Jack Kerouac, Allen Ginsberg, and Gary Snyder—who in turn inspired Ken Kesey and his Merry Pranksters, leading the way to the 1960s upheavals epitomized by San Francisco’s Summer of Love.As camp members engaged in creative acts, they were plowing ground for the next generation, when a new set of young people, facing a war of their own in Vietnam, would populate the massive peace movements of the 1960s.Twenty years in the making and packed with original research, Here on the Edge is the definitive history of the Fine Arts Group at Waldport, documenting how their actions resonated far beyond the borders of the camp. It will appeal to readers interested in peace studies, World War II history, influences on the 1960s generation, and in the rich social and cultural history of the West Coast. [less]

$24.95Recommended
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John Yeon Architecture

Randy Gragg (Editor), Brian Ferriso (Foreword by), Barry Bergdoll (As told to), J. M. Cava (As told to), Marc Treib (As told to)

2017    240 Pages    (Andrea Monfried Editions)

DDC: 724.6    LCC: NA680

OCLC: 961825643    LCCN: 2016962248    ISBN 13: 9780991026371    ISBN 10: 0991026373

-This book marks the rediscovery of a vital voice in midcentury debates on modernism in architecture -Published in conjunction with the exhibition 'Quest for Beauty: John Yeon's Eye for Art, Architecture, and the Oregon Landscape' at the Portland Art Museum (working title), opening May 13, 2017 -Exceptionally beautiful archival photography by masters of the era, including Maynard Parker, Roger Sturtevant, and Ezra Stoller John Yeon (1910-1994) is a pioneering figure in architecture, who paved [...]

-This book marks the rediscovery of a vital voice in midcentury debates on modernism in architecture -Published in conjunction with the exhibition 'Quest for Beauty: John Yeon's Eye for Art, Architecture, and the Oregon Landscape' at the Portland Art Museum (working title), opening May 13, 2017 -Exceptionally beautiful archival photography by masters of the era, including Maynard Parker, Roger Sturtevant, and Ezra Stoller John Yeon (1910-1994) is a pioneering figure in architecture, who paved the way for the Northwest Regional style of modernism. Known for a series of exceptionally beautiful houses - including the Watzek House, a National Historic Landmark - Yeon's architecture was celebrated for its subtle relationship to site and place, and its sensitive deployment of local materials. His far-reaching innovations in construction and early sustainable design, and his stylistic freedom, anticipated several later movements, ranging from ecological modernism to postmodern eclecticism. Yet Yeon's scope of activities stretched far beyond architecture: he was also a planner, conservationist, art collector, historic preservationist, urban activist, and perhaps most of all, a connoisseur. John Yeon Architecture, the first in-depth monograph on Yeon, presents more than 25 built and unbuilt projects for houses, gardens, small public buildings, and exhibitions. Four perceptive essays explore Yeon's life and career: his characteristic design style, his position in the development of Northwest modernism, and his influential role in the stylistic debates of the 1940s and 1950s. John Yeon will be the subject of an exhibition at the Portland Art Museum opening May 13, 2017. It will focus on his art collection (promised to the PAM) but also on his architecture and other activities. This book and the book below are the only books accompanying the exhibition. PAM director Brian Ferriso has written the preface to the book, and Randy Gragg (editor of the book) is one of the curators of the exhibition. [less]

$60.00Recommended
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Louis Bunce: Dialogue with Modernism

Roger Hull

2017    192 Pages    (Hallie Ford Museum of Art, Willamette University)

DDC: 709.795    LCC: ND237.B86

OCLC: 985699323    LCCN: 2016931022    ISBN 13: 9781930957749    ISBN 10: 1930957742

Louis Bunce: Dialogue with Modernism explores and assesses the art and life of the iconic Pacific Northwest modernist painter and printmaker who engaged with American and European modern art from Surrealism to Post-Modernism. Based in Portland, Oregon, Louis Bunce maintained strong ties with artists of the New York School, counting Jackson Pollock as colleague and friend. In his fifty-year career, Bunce (1907-1983) created a wide-ranging body of work that both reflects and illuminates twentieth- [...]

Louis Bunce: Dialogue with Modernism explores and assesses the art and life of the iconic Pacific Northwest modernist painter and printmaker who engaged with American and European modern art from Surrealism to Post-Modernism. Based in Portland, Oregon, Louis Bunce maintained strong ties with artists of the New York School, counting Jackson Pollock as colleague and friend. In his fifty-year career, Bunce (1907-1983) created a wide-ranging body of work that both reflects and illuminates twentieth-century modernism. He pioneered serigraphy as a fine art in the Northwest and as a painter infused painterly abstraction with references to the topography and light of the Northwest. [less]

$39.95
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Mark Rothko: Paintings from the National Gallery of Art in Washington

Marek Bartelik

2013    180 Pages    (National Museum in Warsaw)

DDC: 759.065    LCC: ND237.R725

OCLC: 898669947    ISBN 13: 9788371009396    ISBN 10: 8371009399

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$75.00

Maximum Plunder

Mike King, Paul Herring (Editor), Shawna Gore (Editor)

2016    (Mike King)

DDC: 741.674   

OCLC: 965453866    ISBN 13: 9780692737422    ISBN 10: 0692737421

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$90.00
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Nelson Sandgren: An Artist's Life

Roger Hull

2016    96 Pages    (Hallie Ford Museum of Art, Willamette University)

DDC: 759.13   

OCLC: 950639614    LCCN: 2016931021    ISBN 13: 9781930957756    ISBN 10: 1930957750

The Oregon artist Nelson Sandgren (1917-2006) worked in three distinct media - oil painting, watercolor, and lithography - distinguishing himself in each of these modes throughout his sixty-five-year career. Nelson Sandgren: An Artist's Life is the first in-depth study of this mid-century Oregon modernist who was born in Canada, grew up in Chicago, and moved with his family to Oregon during the Depression. As a watercolorist who loved to paint on site, often on the Oregon coast, Sandgren worked [...]

The Oregon artist Nelson Sandgren (1917-2006) worked in three distinct media - oil painting, watercolor, and lithography - distinguishing himself in each of these modes throughout his sixty-five-year career. Nelson Sandgren: An Artist's Life is the first in-depth study of this mid-century Oregon modernist who was born in Canada, grew up in Chicago, and moved with his family to Oregon during the Depression. As a watercolorist who loved to paint on site, often on the Oregon coast, Sandgren worked in the tradition of Winslow Homer and John Marin. In oil painting, he combined modernist abstraction with Pacific Northwest landscape imagery, in this practice paralleling Louis Bunce, Carl Morris, and other Oregon moderns. As a lithographer, Sandgren was central to the printmaking culture that Gordon Gilkey promoted at Oregon State university, where Sandgren taught for thirty-eight years. Roger Hull provides a detailed biography and a close analysis of Sandgren's key artworks while demonstrating Sandgren's significant place in Pacific Northwest modernist tradition. [less]

$24.95
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Painted Journeys

Peter H. Hassrick, Mindy N. Besaw, Bruce B. Eldridge (Foreword by)

2015    308 Pages    (University of Oklahoma Press)

DDC: 759.13    LCC: ND237.S648 A4

OCLC: 896126716    LCCN: 2014039223    ISBN 13: 9780806151557    ISBN 10: 0806151552

Artist-explorer John Mix Stanley (1814-1872), one of the most celebrated chroniclers of the American West in his time, was in a sense a victim of his own success. So highly regarded was his work that more than two hundred of his paintings were held at the Smithsonian Institution--where in 1865 a fire destroyed all but seven of them. This volume, featuring a comprehensive collection of Stanley's extant art, reproduced in full color, offers an opportunity--and ample reason--to rediscover the [...]

Artist-explorer John Mix Stanley (1814-1872), one of the most celebrated chroniclers of the American West in his time, was in a sense a victim of his own success. So highly regarded was his work that more than two hundred of his paintings were held at the Smithsonian Institution--where in 1865 a fire destroyed all but seven of them. This volume, featuring a comprehensive collection of Stanley's extant art, reproduced in full color, offers an opportunity--and ample reason--to rediscover the remarkable accomplishments of this outsize figure of nineteenth-century American culture. Originally from New York State, Stanley journeyed west in 1842 to paint Indian life. During the U.S.-Mexican War, he joined a frontier military expedition and traveled from Santa Fe to California, producing sketches and paintings of the campaign along the way--work that helped secure his fame in the following decades. He was also appointed chief artist for Isaac Stevens's survey of the 48th parallel for a proposed transcontinental railroad. The essays in this volume, by noted scholars of American art, document and reflect on Stanley's life and work from every angle. The authors consider the artist's experience on government expeditions; his solo tours among the Oregon settlers and western and Plains Indians; and his career in Washington and search for government patronage, as well as his individual works. With contributions by Emily C. Burns, Scott Manning Stevens, Lisa Strong, Melissa Speidel, Jacquelyn Sparks, and Emily C. Wilson, the essays in this volume convey the full scope of John Mix Stanley's artistic accomplishment and document the unfolding of that uniquely American vision throughout the artist's colorful life. Together they restore Stanley to his rightful place in the panorama of nineteenth-century American life and art.     [less]

$34.95Recommended

Painters of the Northwest: Impressionism to Modernism, 1900–1930 (The Charles M. Russell Center Series on Art and Photography of the American West)

John Impert

2018    220 Pages    (University of Oklahoma Press)

DDC: 759.13    LCC: ND1351.6.I47

OCLC: 1004769766    LCCN: 2017044568    ISBN 13: 9780806160344    ISBN 10: 0806160349

From its sweeping coastlines to its soaring inland mountains, verdant valleys, and volcanoes standing in splendid isolation, the Pacific Northwest has long inspired artists to capture the unique spirit of its varied landscape. Yet the early years of twentieth-century Pacific Northwest painting remain shrouded in mystery. In this groundbreaking work, John Impert introduces readers to the rich and varied array of artists and works of art that defined the region’s artistic transition from a [...]

From its sweeping coastlines to its soaring inland mountains, verdant valleys, and volcanoes standing in splendid isolation, the Pacific Northwest has long inspired artists to capture the unique spirit of its varied landscape. Yet the early years of twentieth-century Pacific Northwest painting remain shrouded in mystery. In this groundbreaking work, John Impert introduces readers to the rich and varied array of artists and works of art that defined the region’s artistic transition from a nature-bound impressionism to the arrival of modernism. Focusing on nine artists—Paul Morgan Gustin, C. C. McKim, Clyde Keller, J. Edgar Forkner, Clara Jane Stephens, Dorothy Dolph Jensen, Eustace Paul Ziegler, Mark Tobey, and C. S. Price—art historian John Impert organizes his work around the landscapes, people, and city scenes they painted. He identifies the influence of impressionism, in particular the singular way in which each artist's biography, style, and iconography contribute to a distinctive northwestern sensibility.Painters of the Northwest shows us for the first time how a spectacular natural environment, one that conformed aesthetically to nineteenth-century ideals of romanticism and transcendental reverence, combined with an emphasis on subject over style to create a body of work far more concerned with the natural environment than with the socioeconomic issues that occupied city-bound artists of the day. Establishing a chronology, history, and art historical canon for this little-studied place and time, this book is a long-overdue foundational history of early twentieth-century painting in the Pacific Northwest.   [less]

$45.00
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Ray Stanford Strong, West Coast Landscape Artist (The Charles M. Russell Center Series on Art and Photography of the American West Series)

Mark Humpal

2017    396 Pages    (University of Oklahoma Press)

DDC: 759.13    LCC: ND237.S797

OCLC: 978251873    LCCN: 2017003555    ISBN 13: 9780806157702    ISBN 10: 0806157704

Throughout his long and prolific career, Ray Stanford Strong (1905–2006) strove to capture the essence of the western American landscape. An accomplished painter who achieved national fame during the New Deal era, Strong is best known for his depiction of landscapes in California and Oregon, rendered in his signature plein air style. This beautiful volume, featuring more than 100 color and black-and-white illustrations, is the first comprehensive exploration of Strong’s life and artistry. [...]

Throughout his long and prolific career, Ray Stanford Strong (1905–2006) strove to capture the essence of the western American landscape. An accomplished painter who achieved national fame during the New Deal era, Strong is best known for his depiction of landscapes in California and Oregon, rendered in his signature plein air style. This beautiful volume, featuring more than 100 color and black-and-white illustrations, is the first comprehensive exploration of Strong’s life and artistry. Through family papers, archives, photographs, and a two-year series of interviews conducted with the artist personally, Mark Humpal traces Strong’s journey from his childhood on an Oregon berry farm to his artistically formative years in New York and San Francisco. After moving back to the West Coast, Strong produced important works for the WPA, executed major diorama projects for two world expositions, helped organize the Santa Barbara Art Institute, and served as teacher and mentor for a new generation of plein air artists. But, as Humpal emphasizes, Strong distinguished himself by resisting the drumbeat of the avant-garde. During an era when many artists were experimenting with abstract expressionism, Strong never relinquished his personal vision and adherence to a more traditional style. With his outgoing personality, he forged friendships and associations with such prominent artists as Frank Vincent DuMond, Maynard Dixon, Ansel Adams, Frank Lloyd Wright, and John Steinbeck. Ultimately, Strong had little concern for his place in the sweep of art history. The proficiency he achieved through years of formal and informal study allowed him to craft a personal style difficult to categorize but unique and engaging. By expanding our understanding and appreciation of Strong’s artistic contributions, this book offers a fitting tribute to one of America’s finest landscape artists.   [less]

$45.00
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Shadow Catcher: The Life and Work of Edward S. Curtis

Laurie Lawlor

2005    132 Pages    (Bison Books)

DDC: 770.92    LCC: TR140.C82

OCLC: 60419406    LCCN: 2005012976    ISBN 13: 9780803280465    ISBN 10: 0803280467

Many Native Americans photographed by Edward S. Curtis (1868–1952) called him Shadow Catcher. But the images he captured were far more powerful than mere shadows. When the twentieth century was just getting underway, Curtis began documenting North American Indian culture in words and photographs. Today, almost one hundred years later, his work still stands as the most extensive and informative collection of its kind. His photographs are more than mere documents; they are works of art [...]

Many Native Americans photographed by Edward S. Curtis (1868–1952) called him Shadow Catcher. But the images he captured were far more powerful than mere shadows. When the twentieth century was just getting underway, Curtis began documenting North American Indian culture in words and photographs. Today, almost one hundred years later, his work still stands as the most extensive and informative collection of its kind. His photographs are more than mere documents; they are works of art revealing subtleties of human expression missing from other historical and anthropological records. Filled with Curtis’s breathtaking photographs and available for the first time in a paperback edition, Shadow Catcher traces Curtis’s life and work from his boyhood in Wisconsin, through his first photo expedition to Alaska in 1897 and the completion of The North American Indian collection in 1930, to his death in 1952. [less]

$21.95

Short Nights of the Shadow Catcher: The Epic Life and Immortal Photographs of Edward Curtis

Timothy Egan

2013    384 Pages    (Mariner Books)

DDC: 770.92    LCC: TR140.C82

OCLC: 819717525    ISBN 13: 9780544102767    ISBN 10: 0544102762

“A vivid exploration of one man's lifelong obsession with an idea . . . Egan’s spirited biography might just bring [Curtis] the recognition that eluded him in life.” — Washington Post Edward Curtis was charismatic, handsome, a passionate mountaineer, and a famous portrait photographer, the Annie Leibovitz of his time. He moved in rarefied circles, a friend to presidents, vaudeville stars, leading thinkers. But when he was thirty-two years old, in 1900, he gave it all [...]

“A vivid exploration of one man's lifelong obsession with an idea . . . Egan’s spirited biography might just bring [Curtis] the recognition that eluded him in life.” — Washington Post Edward Curtis was charismatic, handsome, a passionate mountaineer, and a famous portrait photographer, the Annie Leibovitz of his time. He moved in rarefied circles, a friend to presidents, vaudeville stars, leading thinkers. But when he was thirty-two years old, in 1900, he gave it all up to pursue his Great Idea: to capture on film the continent’s original inhabitants before the old ways disappeared. Curtis spent the next three decades documenting the stories and rituals of more than eighty North American tribes. It took tremendous perseverance — ten years alone to persuade the Hopi to allow him to observe their Snake Dance ceremony. And the undertaking changed him profoundly, from detached observer to outraged advocate. Curtis would amass more than 40,000 photographs and 10,000 audio recordings, and he is credited with making the first narrative documentary film. In the process, the charming rogue with the grade school education created the most definitive archive of the American Indian. “A darn good yarn. Egan is a muscular storyteller and his book is a rollicking page-turner with a colorfully drawn hero.” — San Francisco Chronicle "A riveting biography of an American original." – Boston Globe [less]

$15.95
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Two Rooms

Robert Hamburger

1998    407 Pages    (U of Nebraska Press)

DDC: 811    LCC: PS3545.O465 Z69

OCLC: 38125954    LCCN: 97050390    ISBN 13: 9780803273153    ISBN 10: 0803273150

Charles Erskine Scott Wood (1852-1944) led an exuberant life that stretched from his seeing Abraham Lincoln to the dawn of the atomic era. In this captivating, highly readable biography, Robert Hamburger presents both the man and his times, Wood's work, and the intellectual, political, and cultural crosscurrents of his era. 15 photos.

Charles Erskine Scott Wood (1852-1944) led an exuberant life that stretched from his seeing Abraham Lincoln to the dawn of the atomic era. In this captivating, highly readable biography, Robert Hamburger presents both the man and his times, Wood's work, and the intellectual, political, and cultural crosscurrents of his era. 15 photos. [less]

$30.00
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West of the Imagination, The

William H. Goetzmann, William N. Goetzmann

2009    640 Pages    (University of Oklahoma Press)

DDC: 700.978    LCC: NX653.W47

OCLC: 225852410    LCCN: 2008017076    ISBN 13: 9780806135335    ISBN 10: 0806135336

For many people, “western art” immediately conjures images by Frederic Remington or Georgia O’Keeffe—but there’s so much more. From early explorers’ first sketches of the Rockies to the modern earth sculptures of Michael Heizer, images of the American West are as multifaceted as its cultures. This remarkable book embraces them all.A landmark overview of western American art, the original edition of The West of the Imagination brought the region to wide public attention as a companion [...]

For many people, “western art” immediately conjures images by Frederic Remington or Georgia O’Keeffe—but there’s so much more. From early explorers’ first sketches of the Rockies to the modern earth sculptures of Michael Heizer, images of the American West are as multifaceted as its cultures. This remarkable book embraces them all.A landmark overview of western American art, the original edition of The West of the Imagination brought the region to wide public attention as a companion to a popular PBS series of the same name. This book, significantly expanded and updated, shows that the West is a vibrant mirror of American cultural diversity. Through 450 illustrations—more than 300 in color—the authors trace the visual evolution of the myth of the American West, from unknown frontier to repository of American values, covering popular and high arts alike.An unrivaled survey, The West of the Imagination is an immensely informative and pleasurable volume for anyone with an interest in the region’s creative legacy. [less]

$65.00

Witch of Kodakery: The Photography of Myra Albert Wiggins, 1869-1956, The

Carole Glauber

1997    134 Pages    (Washington State University Press)

DDC: 770.92    LCC: TR140.W474

OCLC: 36776465    LCCN: 97016180    ISBN 13: 9780874221480    ISBN 10: 087422148X

'Witch of Kodakery' is a ground-breaking biography of Myra Albert Wiggins, the successful early 20th-century Oregon photographic artist with connections to Alfred Stieglitz and the Photo-Secession. Myra Wiggins (1869-1956) embodied the ideal of the 'new woman' - independent, energetic, and ambitious - as depicted by the Eastman Kodak Company's 'Kodak Girl' and promoted as 'The Witchery of Kodakery' Wiggins began her formal training in 1891 with three [...]

'Witch of Kodakery' is a ground-breaking biography of Myra Albert Wiggins, the successful early 20th-century Oregon photographic artist with connections to Alfred Stieglitz and the Photo-Secession. Myra Wiggins (1869-1956) embodied the ideal of the 'new woman' - independent, energetic, and ambitious - as depicted by the Eastman Kodak Company's 'Kodak Girl' and promoted as 'The Witchery of Kodakery' Wiggins began her formal training in 1891 with three years study at the Art Students League in New York City. Returning to the Pacific Northwest, her artistry encompassed landscapes, portraits, the Dutch genre, and scenes from her travels. Her photographs were exhibited across the United States and Europe, eventually winning more than 50 awards, including a prize trip to Paris in 1900.In modern times, Wiggins' outstanding contribution to photographic art has been largely forgotten. In 'Witch of Kodakery,' biography Carole Glauber resurrects Wiggins' pioneering role with a provocative text and fine examples of the artist's work, particularly Wiggins' most prolific years, 1889 to the 1910s. [less]

$16.95
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